Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

US and World News

older | 1 | .... | 879 | 880 | (Page 881) | 882 | 883 | .... | 906 | newer

    0 0


    Donald Trump is continuing to build out his administration this holiday weekend. The president-elect chose Kathleen Troia "K.T." McFarland, a former government official and current Fox News analyst, as a deputy national security adviser. 

    McFarland said in a statement Friday she's "honored and humbled" to be part of Trump's team. "He has the courage, brilliance and energy to Make America Great Again, and nobody has called foreign policy right more than President-elect Trump, and he gets no credit for it," she said.

    Trump has asked Donald McGahn to serve as his White House counsel, a top transition source confirmed. McGahn is Trump's campaign lawyer and is advising the transition effort.

    “President-elect Trump is a bold leader committed to draining the swamp in Washington and restoring economic prosperity and security," McGahn said.

    The Trump transition team made the formal announcement Friday. Neither position is subject to Senate approval.



    Photo Credit: AP Images

    Kathleen McFarland and Donald McGahn.Kathleen McFarland and Donald McGahn.

    0 0
  • 11/26/16--04:11: Miami Reacts to Castro Death

  • Huge crowds filled the streets of Hialeah after word spread of the death of former Cuban leader Fidel Castro.

    0 0


    Mariel Boatlift: Cubans Flee to Freedom.

    0 0
  • 11/26/16--04:11: Fidel Castro Dead at 90

  • A look back at the life and legacy of Cuba's Fidel Castro.

    0 0


    A South San Francisco police officer who was left in critical condition Thursday after being hit in the head by a suspect's skateboard was identified Friday, police said.

    The violent attack started around 2:20 p.m. Thursday near the 300 block of Grand Avenue when officer Robby Chon, a 12-year veteran of the force, attempted to approach a suspect reportedly disturbing the peace at a local business, police said. The suspect, who was later identified as Luis Alberto Ramos-Coreas, a 28-year-old resident of South Francisco, did not yield to the officer's commands, prompting Chon to call for backup.

    When a second officer arrived, Ramos-Coreas took off from the scene on foot, according to police. During a subsequent chase, Ramos-Coreas immediately came to a screeching halt, pivoted and smacked Chon in the head with the skateboard.

    Chon, who is married with two children, was transported to a local hospital with a "major head injury" and taken into the operating room, police said.

    "The officer underwent emergency surgery for traumatic head injuries," police said in a press conference Friday. "He remains hospitalized in critical condition at this time."

    The second officer on scene was able to detain Ramos-Coreas after another brief foot pursuit, police said. Ramos-Coreas was booked on suspicion of numerous felony charges, including attempted murder of a law enforcement officer.

    Ramos-Coreas does have a history of "criminal contacts" with police, but the specifics of those run-ins were not detailed by officials.

    South San Francisco Mayor Mark Addiego said Friday that this attack is unacceptable.

    "This city will not tolerate violence of any nature directed against its police forces," he said.

    Since the assault, a GoFundMe campaign to support Chon and his family gathered over $20,000 in just three hours. That donation number is expected to grow.

    Officials are currently investigating the attack. Anyone with information is asked to contact the South San Francisco Police Department at (650) 877-8900 or the anonymous tip line at (650) 952-2244.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Ramiro Castillo
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Surveillance video captures a pursuit just before a South San Francisco police officer was hit in the head by a suspect's skateboard. (Nov. 25, 2016)Surveillance video captures a pursuit just before a South San Francisco police officer was hit in the head by a suspect's skateboard. (Nov. 25, 2016)

    0 0


    Cuban television has announced the death of Fidel Castro, the former President of Cuba and leader of the 1950s Cuban revolution. NBC's Bruce Hall reports.

    0 0


    Across South Florida, the death of former Cuban leader Fidel Castro is being met with a sense of celebration from members of the exile community.

    Castro, who spent nearly five decades ruling the country after launching a military takeover in 1959, died Friday night at the age of 90. His death was announced on Cuban television by his brother, Raul, who took over as leader of the nation in 2008 when Fidel Castro stepped down.

    Hundreds of Cuban Americans crowded to the roads in Hialeah and Little Havana to celebrate the demise of the father of communist Cuba.

    People waved Cuba's flag and banged on pots and pans along Bird Road and southwest 87th street.

    The front page of Sunday's Miami Herald is a special edition with a simple headline, DEAD, and a photo of Castro.

    [[403178716, C]]

    For more than five decades, thousands of Cubans have been escaping the communist island to gain freedom in the United States and elsewhere.

    Many South Florida Cubans told NBC 6 Fidel's death is symbolic and may pave the way for true change in Cuba.

    U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who had vocally opposed the Castro regime, said the crowds were not celebrating death, instead they were celebrating "an opportunity to begin a new chapter of freedom".

    Other South Florida members of Congress, including Lincoln and Mario Diaz-Balart as well as Debbie Wasserman Schultz, echoed those thoughts in calling for a change to the island to ensure freedom for those still living on the island.

    The mayors of City of Miami and Miami-Dade County, who are both Cuban American, also reacted to the death of Castro. Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado, described his death as a "victory", while Miami-Dade Carlos Gimenez said the announcement was "something that we've been waiting for".

    Florida Senator Marco Rubio released a statement saying that "the dictator has died, but the dictatorship has not. And one thing is clear, history will not absolve Fidel Castro; it will remember him as an evil, murderous dictator who inflicted misery and suffering on his own people."

    Florida's other U.S. Senator, Bill Nelson, said that the U.S. should "continue to take steps to support the Cuban people" until Raul Castro provides basic rights. Governor Rick Scott said today's news should "usher in an era of freedom, peace and human dignity".

    Other politicians have also chimed in - including Texas Senator Ted Cruz. His father came to America from Cuba in the 1960s:

    Alan Gross, an American citizen who spent five years in a Cuban prision following his arrest on charges of being a spy, also reacted to Castro's death:

    In the religious community, Pope Francis called the death "sad news" while Archbishop Thomas Wenski called for peace for both Cuba and its people.

    Fidel Castro's death comes on the 17th anniversary of when Elian Gonzalez was rescued off the Florida coast.

    In 1999, the Cuban boy landed in Miami after his mother and her boyfriend drowned during their journey from Havana.

    Elian, who was five years old at the time, became embroiled in an international custody battle and eventually returned to Cuba.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    0 0


    A hateful and Islamophobia-laden letter was delivered to a South Bay Muslim community Thursday, prompting law enforcement authorities to commence an investigation.

    Copies of the same letter were also delivered to two Islamic Centers in southern California, the Los Angeles chapter of the Center for American-Islamic Relations said Friday. Long Beach and Pomona police have not yet responded to requests for confirmation.

    The short hand-written letter, which was mailed to the Evergreen Islamic Center in San Jose and addressed to the "Children of Satan," called Muslims a "vile and filthy people" and urged them to "pack your bags and get out of dodge."

    The note also made reference to Donald Trump and said that the president-elect is "going to cleanse America and it make it shine again. And, he's going to start with you Muslims."

    In the final paragraph, the message read, "This is a great time for patriotic Americans. Long live President Trump and God bless the U.S.A."

    Faisal Yazadi, Chairman of the Board at the Evergreen Islamic Center, was baffled by the letter, but not surprised based on the recent tension brewing in the United State following a divisive election season.

    The Islamic center warned parishioners to remain alert and keep an eye out for potential violence, but it is not planning to add visible security to watch over the mosque at this time.

    Yazadi is still pleased that the San Jose Police Department is taking the message seriously.

    "Within minutes of letting them know, I had three cop cars pulled up our our property," he said.

    Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese was alarmed by the behavior displayed in his jurisdiction.

    "It's threatening," he said. "It's obviously threatening. It indicates a state of mind you would hope doesn't exist in Santa Clara County."

    The Council of American-Islamic Relations issued a statement Friday clamoring that police and government leaders step up and protect local mosques.

    "We urge local law enforcement authorities to work with Muslim community leaders to ensure the safety of all houses of worship," Zahra Billoo, the Executive Director for the San Francisco Bay Area chapter of CAIR, wrote. "Our state's political and religious leaders need to speak out against the mainstreaming of Islamophobia that we are witnessing in California and nationwide."

    In a similar fashion, CAIR's Los Angeles chapter called for "stepped-up police protection of local mosques" in response to the letters.  

    Less than two weeks ago, an anti-Muslim note was left on a woman's car in Milpitas.

    Anyone with information regarding the recent letter is asked to contact the San Jose Police Department's Assaults Unit, which is responsible for handling hate-related incidents, at (408) 277-4161. Those wishing to remain anonymous can call Crime Stoppers at (408) 947-7867.



    Photo Credit: NBC Bay Area
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    The Evergreen Islamic Center in San Jose received a hate-filled message Thursday. (November 25, 2016)The Evergreen Islamic Center in San Jose received a hate-filled message Thursday. (November 25, 2016)

    0 0


    Cuba's Fidel Castro came into power in 1959 after leading an overthrow of the military dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista. Castro transformed the country into the first communist state in the Western Hemisphere, handing off power to his younger brother Raúl Castro in 2008.

    0 0


    Fidel Castro, the father of communist Cuba who led the country for nearly half a century, died Friday night at the age of 90, President Raul Castro announced on state TV.

    The former president was expected to be cremated, as he wished, on Saturday, his brother said in the brief televised message, which he concluded with the revolutionary rallying cry, "onward toward victory, always."

    The Cuban government announced nine days of national mourning beginning Saturday and culminating with a burial ceremony Dec. 4. In the meantime, a mass gathering will be held in the capital Tuesday. The following day, his ashes will embark on a four-day tour of the country retracing the "Caravan of Liberty" he led after ousting his predecessor in 1959.

    Celebrations erupted on the streets of Cuban-American neighborhoods in Miami and remembrances from world leaders poured in when word spread that the divisive, iconic figure had passed away.

    Castro retreated from the public eye in 2006 following emergency surgery for intestinal bleeding. His health problems forced him to temporarily hand power to his younger brother, who permanently took his place as president in 2008. 

    Castro's death follows a historic thawing of relations between Cuba and the United States with the announcement in mid-December that the countries planned to restore diplomatic and economic ties.

    Six weeks after that announcement, Castro made his first comments about the deal, writing that he backs the negotiations even though he distrusts American politics.

    "I don't trust the policy of the United States, nor have I exchanged a word with them, but this does not mean I reject a pacific solution to the conflicts," he wrote in a letter to a student federation read at the University of Havana.

    In a statement released Saturday, President Obama called for continued partnership between Cuba and the United States.

    "Today, we offer condolences to Fidel Castro's family, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Cuban people," Obama said in the statement. "In the days ahead, they will recall the past and also look to the future. As they do, the Cuban people must know that they have a friend and partner in the United States of America."

    "We will always defend cooperation and friendship with all the people of the world, including with our political adversaries," he wrote.

    President-elect Donald Trump, meanwhile, assailed Castro as a "brutal dictator" in a statement Saturday. 

    "Today, the world marks the passing of a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people for nearly six decades," Trump said in the statement. "Fidel Castro’s legacy is one of firing squads, theft, unimaginable suffering, poverty and the denial of fundamental human rights."

    Trump's statement goes on to say that his administration will work toward ensuring "prosperity" and "liberty" for the Cuban people. 

    "Though the tragedies, deaths and pain caused by Fidel Castro cannot be erased, our administration will do all it can to ensure the Cuban people can finally begin their journey toward prosperity and liberty," the statement read. 

    Since relinquishing power, Castro's health had been the topic of intense speculation. On several occasions, media reported inaccurately that he was near death or had died. Once in 2012, Castro replied to the rumors himself in an article published on Cuba Debate, a state-run website, in which he boasted that he was not only alive, but didn't "even remember what a headache is."

    Castro had defied death many times before, both as the revolutionary who led an armed uprising against dictator Fulgencio Batista, and as Batista's communist successor who inspired a number of U.S.-backed assassination plots. Nine U.S. presidents came and went during Castro's rule, which, like him, proved resilient, outlasting most other communist governments around the world. 

    For 49 years Castro ran Cuba, transforming what was once an American playground with striking social inequalities into a poor, isolated country with a notorious record on human rights. To some, he was a hero. Through a rigid system of socialized medicine, education and cultural facilities, Castro's government elevated Cuba's most impoverished citizens and reduced the sort of racial inequalities prevalent throughout the Americas. For challenging and insulting U.S. policies and presidents, he won the devotion of like-minded leaders, including the late Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. In a 2004 speech slamming the U.S. war on terrorism, for example, Castro accused President George W. Bush of hypocrisy and fraud, while in 2011 he penned an op-ed in the Cuban press calling President Barack Obama "stupid."

    His own critics, however, were not tolerated. To those who challenged his revolutionary vision or lived outside of the rigid framework he established on the island—which for years quarantined its HIV-positive citizens and jailed everyone from dissidents to homosexuals—he was a brutal dictator.

    U.S. politicians were among the most harsh Castro critics. Florida Senator Marco Rubio condemned Castro in a statement Saturday, writing in part: "One thing is clear, history will not absolve Fidel Castro; it will remember him as an evil, murderous dictator who inflicted misery and suffering on his own people."

    Castro's human rights abuses and economic policies prompted throngs of Cubans to flee, many risking their lives to do so. One of the largest mass exoduses came in 1980 when Castro opened the exits to more than a hundred thousand citizens, including prisoners and mental patients who were loaded on boats bound for Florida. In a speech to supporters, Castro happily bid them farewell and mocked the United States for "doing an excellent sanitation job for us."

    In his final years, however, Castro appeared to be taking a more critical look at the policies he had enacted, calling his government's treatment of gays, for example, an "injustice," and saying in 2010 that "the Cuban model [of communism] doesn't even work for us anymore."

    Indeed, Raul Castro has loosened both travel restrictions and the government's grip on the economy since taking power in 2008, allowing citizens to open some small businesses and legally buy everything from computers and cell phones to foreign cars, however exorbitantly taxed they may be.

    The agreement to normalize relations between Cuba and the United States came as prisoners in both countries were freed, among them U.S. subcontractor Alan Gross, sentenced in 2009 to 15 years in prison for trying to set up internet access for the Jewish community in Cuba. But the U.S. trade embargo in place for more than 50 years remained in place. Only Congress can lift it.

    Raul Castro, currently 85, has said that he will not seek reelection at the end of his second term in 2018, which will leave the leadership of the country open to someone other than an original Cuban revolutionary for the first time since the overthrow of Batista.  

    Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz, the son of a wealthy Spanish-born landowner and his cook, was born Aug. 13, 1926. His upbringing, which exposed him to both the privilege and poverty of his nation, laid the groundwork for his revolutionary path later on.

    His political views were further shaped at the University of Havana, where he studied law. After graduating, he delved deeper into revolutionary politics and ultimately organized the rebellion that would overthrow Batista. Joined by his brother Raul, and the legendary guerrilla fighter Ernesto "Che" Guevarra, Castro succeeded in ousting his predecessor in 1959 after two failed attempts, one of which landed him in prison. 

    While the United States quickly recognized Castro's new government, it cut off diplomatic ties as the country's communist policies – such as the nationalization of U.S. properties in Cuba – became clear.

    The next few years were marked by increasingly desperate attempts on the part of the U.S. to remove Castro from power. The Bay of Pigs invasion, a botched mission that sent U.S.-trained Cuban exiles back home to take down Castro, became one of the biggest embarrassments of John F. Kennedy's presidency, and emboldened Castro and his supporters. 

    Months later, Castro green-lighted the construction of Soviet nuclear missile sites on the island, well within range of U.S. targets. When Kennedy caught wind of the plans, a 13-day standoff ensued, with Kennedy ultimately convincing the Soviets to back down in exchange for the removal of U.S. missiles from Turkey. The so-called Cuban Missile Crisis was a defining moment for both Kennedy and Castro and further embittered relations between the two countries.

    Castro's prolific writing and famously long-winded speeches regularly featured tirades against the U.S. and insistence that Cuba would never change course. "Socialism or death! Fatherland or death!" was the motto.

    Though he demonstrated, throughout his life, his willingness to die for his vision and values, he survived one of the longest and most controversial political careers of the 20th century, only stepping down as the result of his declining health.

    Little is known about how Castro spent his final years. The topic of both his health and personal life have been closely guarded secrets, with Castro revealing only as much as he wished. It is unclear, for example, just how many children he fathered. Asked in an interview for Vanity Fair in 1993, Castro replied, "it's almost a tribe."

    What is known is this: He was married twice, first to Mirt Diaz-Balart, whom he divorced in 1955 after having one child, and later to Dalia Soto del Valle, with whom he had five sons. Others have been cited as mistresses and children, including Alina Fernandez, a Cuban exile who published a memoir about growing up as Castro's daughter in 1960s Cuba.

    After leaving the presidency, Castro wrote a series of his own personal reflections, though his focused mainly on past and current events. In his final post, published in September 2013, Castro expressed relief that the U.S. appeared to be backing away from plans to intervene militarily in Syria's civil war—a move, he said, that could prevent "global catastrophe."



    Photo Credit: AP

    n this Oct. 12, 1979 file photo, Cuban President, Fidel Castro, points during his lengthy speech before the United Nations General Assembly, in New York. The man who nationalized the Cuban economy and controlled of virtually every aspect of life on the island died Friday.n this Oct. 12, 1979 file photo, Cuban President, Fidel Castro, points during his lengthy speech before the United Nations General Assembly, in New York. The man who nationalized the Cuban economy and controlled of virtually every aspect of life on the island died Friday.

    0 0


    Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. says President elect-Donald Trump offered him the job of education secretary, but that he turned it down for personal reasons.

    Falwell tells The Associated Press that Trump offered him the job last week during a meeting in New York. He says Trump wanted a four- to six-year commitment, but that he couldn't leave Liberty for more than two years. 

    Falwell says he couldn't afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that and didn't want to move his family, especially his 16-year-old daughter.

    Trump announced Wednesday he had selected charter school advocate Betsy DeVos for the job. Falwell says he thinks DeVos is an "excellent choice."

    Trump spoke at the Christian university in Lynchburg, Virginia, in January and Falwell later endorsed him.



    Photo Credit: AP

    In this Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016 photo, Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., talks during an interview in his offices at the school in Lynchburg, Va. Falwell Jr. enthusiastically endorsed Donald Trump in January.In this Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016 photo, Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., talks during an interview in his offices at the school in Lynchburg, Va. Falwell Jr. enthusiastically endorsed Donald Trump in January.

    0 0


    No one does Black Friday quite like the team behind Cards Against Humanity.

    The Chicago-based company behind the popular card game continued its tradition of absurd Black Friday antics by raising thousands of dollars to dig a massive hole. 

    Yes, you read that correctly – the "party game for horrible people" launched its "Holiday Hole" campaign at 12 p.m. CST on Friday with a livestream of a hole being dug with a countdown clock and an option to donate.

    "As long as money keeps coming in, we'll keep digging," promises holidayhole.com, the website dedicated to the cause. For every dollar donated, about 0.5 seconds is added to the countdown clock. 

    As of Saturday afternoon, the promotion had raised more than $80,000 with about 23 hours of dig time remaining. 

    The site's FAQ page answers some of the burning questions on the minds of fans and critics alike:
    What’s happening here?
    Cards Against Humanity is digging a holiday hole.
    Is this real?
    Unfortunately it is.
    Where is the hole?
    America. And in our hearts.
    Is there some sort of deeper meaning or purpose to the hole?
    No.
    What do I get for contributing money to the hole?
    A deeper hole. What else are you going to buy, an iPod?

    This is hardly the first time Cards Against Humanity has launched a campaign mocking the busiest shopping day of the year. In 2013, the company increased the game's price by $5 in lieu of offering a Black Friday sale, only to outdo itself the following year by selling boxes of actual poop

    That promotion sold out to more than 30,000 customers, many of whom were shocked when bull feces arrived on their doorstep. The company then donated the proceeds to nonprofit organization Heifer International. 

    In 2015, the "Give Cards Against Humanity $5 Sale" raked in more than $71,000 by selling literally "nothing" for $5 and distributing the haul among employees who spent it on a variety of hilarious purchases that included a suit of armor, several trips and thousands of dollars in charitable donations.

    For those thinking that the company with a track record of holiday giving would put the "Holiday Hole" money to another good cause, the site kills that hope in answering the question, "Why aren’t you giving all this money to charity?"

    "Why aren’t YOU giving all this money to charity? It’s your money," the FAQ retorts.

    "You’re supposed to think it’s funny," the site tells readers wondering how to feel. "You might not get it for a while, but some time next year you’ll chuckle quietly to yourself and remember all this business about the hole."



    Photo Credit: Cards Against Humanity/YouTube
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    0 0


    An East Bay family is shocked and unsettled after someone cut electricity to their home and planted 56 American flags, seven of which were defaced with handwritten pro-Donald Trump messages, on their front lawn early Saturday morning.

    Concord police are investigating the incident, reported by Jay and Denisen Hartlove, who live on Montana Drive in Concord. 

    The couple was preparing for bed just after midnight when Jay heard someone fiddling with their screen door. When he went to check out the noise, he says he found scores of plastic American flags staked into his front lawn, and a man — believed to be a neighbor with whom the family has had previous issues  — skulking away from the house.

    "There was one in the door handle to our car, there were flags all over the front lawn, and there was one in our screen door," Denisen Hartlove said.

    Some of the flags had "Build The Damn Wall" and "I Luv The Donald" written on them in black ink. The Hartloves say they are one of the more liberal families on the block, and believe they may have been targeted because of it.

    "Why would someone do that?" Jay wondered. "I mean, (the vandal) must have spent 20 minutes out there putting the flags in. This is not some drive-by prank….I mean, where do you get 56 flags in November?"

    Upon finding the flags, the couple was irked but not worried.

    "We tried to brush it off – Trump flags aren’t going to hurt anyone," Denisen said. "We sort of made light of the situation, like ha ha ha." The couple confronted the neighbor who they think is responsible, but neither Jay nor Denisen got a response.

    A short time later, at about 1:30 a.m., the situation became more serious. The Hartloves heard a huge bang and were plunged into complete darkness.

    At first, they thought the abrupt loss of electricity could be related to the fireworks going off in the street hours earlier, but they soon discovered that the metering box connecting power to their property had been ripped off. It was then that they became worried and frightened for their safety, and the safety of their two daughters, who were asleep in bed.

    "At that point, I thought we were under attack," Denisen said.

    The couple called the Concord Police Department and filed a police report with two officers, both of whom the Hartloves describe as being "very unhelpful."

    "They basically said that because (the neighbor) denied doing it, they couldn’t do anything," Jay said.

    The entire experience, from the vandalism to the Concord police "not taking the situation seriously," has left the family reeling, according to Denisen.

    "This is our home," she said. "We should be able to feel safe in our home."

    Chris Blakely, a spokesman with the Concord Police Department, said that officers are investigating, and noted that a detective has already been assigned to the case. A follow-up is scheduled for Monday, he said.

    "For us to do our job efficiently, we have to make sure that we get all the information," Blakely said. "That includes taking photographs, talking to neighbors, seeing if anyone has surveillance footage. It’s not as quick as some people want, but we do take it seriously."

    Throughout the Bay Area and the nation, politically-motivated instances of harassment are being reported at an alarming rate, according to hate-tracking groups. As of Monday, the Southern Poverty Law Center had noted 701 reports of harassment since election day.

    Many critics have pointed to President-elect Donald Trump's campaign rhetoric as fueling the incidents. In a sit-down interview with 60 Minutes, Trump told any of his supporters engaging in the behavior to "stop it."

    Meanwhile, the Hartloves, who have lived on Montana street for 20 years, are in the process of installing surveillance cameras around their home — a security measure they never thought they would need in their safe, suburban neighborhood.

    "We like our house. We like the street. We like our neighbors. With very few exceptions, it’s a wonderful place to be," Denisen said. "But, at this stage, I don’t know that I’m not going to wake up with the house burning down around me.

    "I use to be friends with his wife, and I really don't know when things went south or why," Denisen said.

    For her, the silver lining on a dark cloud has been the neighbors — Republican and Democrat — who have stepped up to condemn the vandalism.

    "We had quite a few neighbors offer support and say ‘You know what, that’s not OK. It doesn’t matter who you voted for, that’s not an okay thing to do,’" she recalled. "They offered us help, and that was really nice to see. It was just really nice to see people step forward from our community."

    NBC Bay Area's Rick Boone contributed to this report.

    Gillian Edevane covers Contra Costa County for NBC Bay Area. Contact her at Gillian.Edevane@NBCuni.com or through text or call at (669) 263-2895.



    Photo Credit: Gillian Edevane
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    A Concord family found 56 flags planted on their home, seven of which contained pro-Trump messages, and their power was cut off. (Nov. 26, 2016).A Concord family found 56 flags planted on their home, seven of which contained pro-Trump messages, and their power was cut off. (Nov. 26, 2016).

    0 0


    Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday criticized Republican objections to the Wisconsin recount effort, arguing that the move is within legal rights and fairly common after elections.

    "We have recounts, probably almost every election there's a recount," Sanders, I-Vt., said on CNN. "No one expects there to be profound change but there's nothing wrong with going through the process."

    Wisconsin election officials accepted Green Party candidate Jill Stein's petition for a statewide recount, which is slated to begin late next week. The recount plan has drawn scorn from President-elect Donald Trump and his surrogates.

    When asked about senior adviser Kellyanne Conway's tweets that decried Hillary Clinton supporters for challenging the results after pressuring Trump to do the same during the general election, Sanders replied that "nobody cares."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File

    Sen. Bernie Sanders is pictured in this stock photo.Sen. Bernie Sanders is pictured in this stock photo.

    0 0
  • 11/27/16--19:44: Miami Crowd Boos Kaepernick

  • Playing in Miami on Sunday just days after getting tangled in a "heated" discussion about Fidel Castro with a newspaper reporter, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick received a "flood of boos" from the South Florida crowd, CSN Bay Area reporter Matt Maiocco tweeted.

    Kaepernick's Castro talk began months ago when he flashed a shirt featuring the former leader of Cuba, who passed away late Friday, meeting with Malcolm X. The lettering across the shirt read, "Like minds think alike."

    After the 49ers’ 31-24 loss to the Dolphins, Kaepernick was asked about some of the statements he made, in which he defended Castro’s record of education in Cuba.

    “What I said was that I agree with the investment in education,” Kaepernick said. “I also agree with the investment in free universal health care, as well as the involvement in him helping end apartheid in South Africa. I would hope that everybody agrees that those things are good things. Trying to push the false narrative that I was a supporter of the oppressive things that he did, it’s just not true.”

    Kaepernick, who again wore a T-shirt depicting Malcolm X, was asked about his shirt selection.

    “I’ve worn many Malcolm X shirts,” Kaepernick said. “He was a great man, and he lived the life that he talked about. He was someone that truly walked the walk and was a great leader for the African community and someone I admire.”

    When asked Sunday if he understands concerns that arose with his decision to wear a shirt that portrayed Castro, Kaepernick said, “I can understand the concern. But for me what I said was that was a historic moment for Malcolm.

    Kaepernick added, "I’m not going to cut out pieces of Malcolm’s life. In 1960 when they met in Harlem, that was a historic moment. That’s something that I will always be true to what Malcolm was, what he represented because I’m not going to cut out history.”

    During a conference call earlier this week, a Miami Herald reporter, who is reportedly related to Cuban exiles, questioned the San Francisco signal caller's choice to don the shirt with Castro, to which Kaepernick responded by saying, "I'm not talking about Fidel Castro and his oppression. I'm talking about Malcom X and what he's done for people."

    The reporter then condemned Kaepernick for changing the subject of the discussion away from Castro's history of abuses. The quarterback responded by applauding Castro for investing more in education instead of criminal punishment.

    Kaepernick answered the jeers Sunday by leading his offensive unit to the end zone on the team's first drive of the game. He finished with 296 yards through the air and three scores to go along with 113 yards on the ground.

    CSN's Matt Maiocco contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Eric Espada, Getty Images

    Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers warms up before the start of the game against the Miami Dolphins at Hard Rock Stadium, Nov. 27, 2016, Miami Gardens, Florida.Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers warms up before the start of the game against the Miami Dolphins at Hard Rock Stadium, Nov. 27, 2016, Miami Gardens, Florida.

    0 0


    “Under heavy bombardments now, can’t be alive anymore,” a Syrian woman tweeted Sunday. The woman, along with her 7-year-old daughter Bana, had attracted global attention in recent months for using the social media platform to document the daily struggles of a family living in Aleppo.

    The woman, referred to only as Fatemah out of concern for her safety, told NBC News that she tweeted the farewell as the town came under increasingly heavy bombardment Sunday.

    “When we die, keep talking for 200,000 still inside. BYE,” read the rest of her goodbye dispatch. Fatemah followed up later Sunday — she and her family had survived the attacks, but their home was destroyed, she said.

    She said Sunday was “the hardest day” so far in Aleppo, where the United Nations estimates nearly a million Syrians are living under siege. After a short-lived cease-fire in September, President Bashar Assad’s government stepped up its ground and air campaigns and since has hit hospitals, destroyed infrastructure and caused hundreds of civilian casualties.



    Photo Credit: AP

    This photo provided by the Shafak Charity Organization, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows an ambulance destroyed following four consecutive airstrikes on a medical facility dedicated to women in the northern Idlib province, Syria, Nov. 25, 2016.This photo provided by the Shafak Charity Organization, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows an ambulance destroyed following four consecutive airstrikes on a medical facility dedicated to women in the northern Idlib province, Syria, Nov. 25, 2016.

    0 0


    Donald Trump talks "regularly" with President Barack Obama and "very much enjoys" their conversations, a top Trump aide said Sunday.

    Speaking on NBC's "Meet the Press," Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway said Trump's consulted the president on his Cuba policy and the two spoke this weekend.

    "He's even been talking to President Obama. You know, beyond the sit-down they had 30 hours or so after President-elect Trump won the election, they've been talking regularly on any number of issues. They talked just yesterday," she said.

    The latest conversation went on about 40-45 minutes, she said, though she wouldn't offer details on what was discussed. But the two "get along nicely," Conway added, despite their differences.

    A Trump transition team official later told NBC News that the president-elect and his predecessor have spoken several times since they met in the Oval Office two weeks ago.



    Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    President-elect Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Trump International Golf Club for a day of meetings on Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.President-elect Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Trump International Golf Club for a day of meetings on Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.

    0 0


    A winning Powerball ticket was sold in Tennessee, netting an unknown victor the entire $420.9 million jackpot. 

    No winner had come forward to claim it as of Sunday morning, though the Tennessee Lottery did tweet that the winning ticket was sold in Lafayette.

    The prize is the second largest overall jackpot for the Tennessee Lottery. The first was a $528.8 million Powerball prize won by a family in January 2016, who split the $1.58 billion record pot with winners in two other states.

    The latest jackpot surged over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend after no winning numbers were selected in a Wednesday night drawing.

    The latest winning numbers called Saturday night were: 17-19-21-37-44, Powerball: 16, Power Play: 2 

    The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are one in 292.2 million. The popular game is played in 44 states plus Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.



    Photo Credit: AP

    In this Jan. 13, 2016 file photo, a clerk hands over a Powerball ticket for cash at Tower City Lottery Stop in Cleveland.In this Jan. 13, 2016 file photo, a clerk hands over a Powerball ticket for cash at Tower City Lottery Stop in Cleveland.

    0 0


    The normal liveliness found in Havana's streets was notably absent Sunday afternoon as Cubans prepare to nationally memorialize the late Fidel Castro. 

    Sounds of afro-Cuban music wafting from the trumpets and drums of sidewalk bands were gone. There were no dancers shimmying on sidewalks. The hustle and bustle of Havana is always present, but at this moment, it is a city paying its respects.

    "The Cuban people love Fidel," said Yhosvani "Yuri" Mazola. "We love Fidel, always we love Fidel."

    Yuri Mazola spent seven years restoring a pink 1951 Pontiac, complete with its original engine and gear box. It's as if the country went back in time; streets were uncharacteristically silent Sunday afternoon while the automobile rolled through the famed Malecon. A banner hung in front of Plaza 13 de Marzo waved in the air; it said "thank you for everything, Fidel" in spanish.

    The somber atmosphere marks the beginning of an eight-day period of mourning for Fidel Castro, the polarizing, yet revolutionary former Cuban leader.

    Even those who were oppressed under Castro's regime are showing respect, such as Berta Soler, the leader of "Damas de Blanco", or the Ladies in White, an opposition movement founded in 2003. The women and relatives of jailed dissidents typically march every Sunday after church; today, they remained inside for fear of retribution.

    "Nothing will change the dictator. The dictator Raul Castro will continue his war," Soler said. "More than dictators, they are like a mafia family: they can do whatever they want and they are still in charge of everything."

    Regardless of the feelings Cubans have toward the late ruler, the historical and cultural significance of his death is undeniable. 

    "We're all very aware that it is a historical moment," said Luis Duno-Gottberg, professor of Caribbean-American studies at Rice University in Houston. "I was telling my students 'yesterday the 20th century came to an end.' It is that significant."

    Tomorrow, Havana will prepare to eulogize Fidel Castro in a large ceremony at Plaza de la Revolución, which thousands are expected to attend. But with his passing comes uncertainty of how relations between the U.S. and Cuba will progress.

    New non-stop airline flights to the U.S. from Cuba will begin the same day as the ceremony — the first in more than 50 years. This means good news for American tourism in Cuba, which is up 80 percent this year.

    Thawing relations is a good sign for baseball fanatics like Yuri, who told News 4 he hopes one day he can see his New York Yankees play in the Bronx. 


    0 0
  • 11/28/16--04:00: Tx. School Rejects 'Racism'

  • A Dallas preparatory school for boys denounced actions by one of its graduates, releasing a statement on Friday that said it rejects "racism and bigotry in all of its forms and expressions."

    The message from St. Mark's School of Texas did not name the graduate but referenced a video of the alumnus "leading a white nationalist meeting in Washington, D.C."

    White nationalist Richard Spencer, an alumnus of St. Mark's, lead a conference in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 19, drawing Nazi-style salutes from people in the audience.

    In a video released on YouTube by The Atlantic, Spencer praised the election of Donald Trump as president by saying, "Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!"

    “America was, until this past generation, a white country designed for ourselves and our posterity,” Spencer said. “It is our creation, it is our inheritance, and it belongs to us.” 

    St. Mark's statement, from headmaster David W. Dini, read in part:

    On Friday, November 18th in our annual Thanksgiving message to alumni,
    parents, and faculty, we referenced recent news stories that connect St. Mark’s to ideas
    expressed by one of our graduates that conflict directly with our core values and
    principles. Just one day later, video footage emerged of this alumnus leading a white
    nationalist meeting in Washington, D.C., bringing even greater attention to these hateful,
    divisive, racist, and anti-Semitic views. This has been deeply troubling and terribly
    upsetting to our whole school community. At St. Mark’s, we reject racism and bigotry in
    all its forms and expressions. Our mission, values, and programs stand in direct
    opposition to these vulgar ideas. In light of such comments, our mission to develop boys
    of strong character, compassion, empathy, and courage has increasing relevance and
    importance.

    "On Friday, November 18th in our annual Thanksgiving message to alumni,parents, and faculty, we referenced recent news stories that connect St. Mark’s to ideas expressed by one of our graduates that conflict directly with our core values and principles. Just one day later, video footage emerged of this alumnus leading a white nationalist meeting in Washington, D.C., bringing even greater attention to these hateful, divisive, racist, and anti-Semitic views. This has been deeply troubling and terribly upsetting to our whole school community. At St. Mark’s, we reject racism and bigotry in all its forms and expressions. Our mission, values, and programs stand in direct opposition to these vulgar ideas. In light of such comments, our mission to develop boys of strong character, compassion, empathy, and courage has increasing relevance and importance."

    It continued:

    "We remain deeply committed to including and valuing all students of different backgrounds, races, religions, beliefs, and experiences, and our commitment to those ideals is paramount and immutable."

    Spencer is scheduled to address students at Texas A&M University on Dec. 6. The school said it did not invite Spencer but cannot stop the speech because people can reserve campus space available to the public.

    The Dallas Morning News reported that some of Spencer's former classmates at St. Mark's began an online fundraising campaign to repudiate his ideas. The goal is to raise money for the International Rescue Committee, a nonprofit group that helps refugees and asylum-seekers, including in the United States.

    Last December, the state of Texas tried to bar the International Rescue Committee from resettling Syrian refugees in Texas. But in June, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that Texas had no legal standing to bring a suit.



    Photo Credit: Linda Davidson / The Washington Post/Getty Images

    Richard Spencer, president of the National Policy InstituteRichard Spencer, president of the National Policy Institute

older | 1 | .... | 879 | 880 | (Page 881) | 882 | 883 | .... | 906 | newer