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    The Smithsonian has millions of artifacts, but most of them are not on display in museums, so an effort is underway to display them online.

    At a heavily guarded facility in Maryland, the Smithsonian stores 30 million artifacts, including an 1830s carriage, a high wheel, Evel Knievel’s motorcycle and the original chairs from “Meet the Press.”

    “It's really quite fun to read up on some of those things,” museum specialist James Oakley said. “I mean, I never heard of a Winton.”

    (It’s a race car that only went 1 mile in 43 seconds in 1904.)

    The Museum of American History is serious about preservation.

    “Sometimes that means keeping things in storage, in dark, in certain climate conditions so that when it comes time for researchers to look at them or for them to go on display they will be in good condition,” curator Shannon Perich said.

    “I always say as a historian you have to be ready to be cold,” curator Alexandra Lord quipped.

    But artifacts don’t just sit in storage, associate curator Diane Wendt said. They are researched.

    In medical collections, drawers and shelves protect surgical tools from the Revolutionary War, the first artificial heart and a condom dispenser from the 1940s — one of the government’s oldest sexual education campaigns, and it reflected the culture of the time: that they were solely to prevent disease, not pregnancy.

    With future exhibits yet to be announced, nobody knows how long those boxes of incredible things will stay locked away, but thanks to technology, the public has a chance to get a close-up to a lot of hidden history. The museum is putting a huge effort to getting items digitized to make them available to the world.

    Project assistant Rachel Anderson spends hours studying and photographing artifacts, capturing various angles. She does it quickly to limit the object’s exposure to light or heat.

    “It's a really big undertaking, and we keep chipping away at it,” Anderson said.

    The team recently added 2,100 objects to the museum’s growing archives online. It took six months, and there are thousands more to go.

    “What we're engaged with right now is a preservation effort, it's a documentation effort and it's an accessibility effort,” Anderson said.

    There’s a conservation component, too — with a world of labs, work stations and talent with just the right touch to preserve history.



    Photo Credit: NBCWashington

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    Jill Stein, who ran for president as the Green Party candidate, is seeking a recount of the votes in the battleground states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, her campaign said on Wednesday.

    Donald Trump's margin of victory over Hillary Clinton was narrow in all three states, which were expected to vote Democratic, and the results have become the focus of speculation — based on little proof — that the vote may have been tampered with. Stein acknowledged those fears in her statement announcing the recount drive.

    "After a divisive and painful presidential race, reported hacks into voter and party databases and individual email accounts are causing many American to wonder if our election results are reliable," Stein said. "These concerns need to be investigated before the 2016 presidential election is certified. We deserve elections we can trust."

    The deadline for filing for a recount in Wisconsin is Friday at a cost of $1.1 million. Stein and her running mate, Ajamu Baraka, are raising money to fund the effort. Their goal is $2 million by Friday afternoon.

    The announcement follows a New York magazine report that some computer scientists have been urging Democrat Hillary Clinton to ask for the recount in the three states. The article questioned the deviation in election results from predictions in polls. 

    J. Alex Halderman, a computer science professor at the University of Michigan, confirmed on Medium that he had been in touch with the Clinton campaign but said his views had been misrepresented and it was "probably not" true that the election was hacked.

    "I believe the most likely explanation is that the polls were systematically wrong, rather than the election was hacked," he wrote. 

    But he also said that the only way to know whether a cyberattack changed the result was to examine the paper ballots and voting equipment in the three states.

    President-elect Donald Trump beat Clinton with 290 electoral votes to Clinton's 232, with Michigan outstanding. Clinton has a lead of more than 2 million popular votes. 

    The deadline in Pennsylvania is Monday and Wednesday in Michigan.

    Halderman, who also is director of Michigan's Center for Computer Security and Society, wrote that many states continue to use voting machines that are known to be insecure and that can be infected with vote-stealing malware. Checking the paper record in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan would allow voters to be confident the results were counted correctly, he wrote.

    "Examining the physical evidence in these states — even if it finds nothing amiss — will help allay doubt and give voters justified confidence that the results are accurate," Halderman wrote.

    An article on Nate Silver's FiveThirtyEight website, which predicted the race incorrectly, cast doubt on concerns about tampering with the electronic voting machines. Demographics explain the results, Carl Bialik and Rob Arthur wrote.

    "We've looked into the claim — or at least, our best guess of what's being claimed based on what has been reported — and statistically, it doesn't check out," they wrote.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein at a press conference at the National Press Club  in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, August 23, 2016.Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein at a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, August 23, 2016.

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    Sweat was pouring into the eyes of New York City bomb squad technician Jason Hallick inside a 90-pound, armored body suit as he disabled a pressure cooker bomb in Manhattan, he tells "NBC Nightly News" anchor Lester Holt.

    The bomb was placed in Chelsea in September by Ahmad Khan Rahami, authorities say, and another one had already exploded, injuring 31 people. (Wounded in a shootout with police, Rahami has pleaded not guilty.)

    Now, this second device spotted, it was up to NYPD bomb squad technicians, their suits and their robots to prevent more people from being hurt.

    "Nobody here can ever be paralyzed by fear," bomb squad commander Mark Torre said in the exclusive interview with Holt. "But we all have that very healthy respect for the force of explosives and what it can do. So there was a healthy degree of tension. Everybody's very, very focused."



    Photo Credit: NBC News

    "NBC Nightly News" host Lester Holt (left, in bomb suit) with Det. Jason Hallik of the NYPD bomb squad.

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    It has been nearly two years since the Lincoln Mall in south suburban Matteson, Illinois, closed its doors. But take a look inside today, and things already look drastically different inside the abandoned building.

    Photo Credit: Seph Lawless

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    Los Angeles police officers Joe Cirrito and Kristina Tudor know that running 420 miles to Sacramento over 12 days is going to be an exercise in agony, but they're doing it for the greater good — raising money for the families of officers killed in the line of duty.

    The officers are set to begin their journey Sunday at the Los Angeles Police Academy in Elysian Park. They'll run with the added weight of their uniforms, fully loaded and duty-ready Sam Browne belts and boots that, Tudor said, "feel like anchors tied to your feet."

    "We're going into the unknown," said Tudor, 30, who at a diminutive 5 feet 3 inches tall is an ultramarathon runner and one of about 10 women on the LAPD's elite Metropolitan Division. "There are definitely things we're going to be learning about ourselves that we probably didn't even know existed."

    Cirrito, who is 47 years old and 5 feet 11 inches, joked that this run is his midlife crisis. A sprinter in college who hated distance, Cirrito has been running 80 miles a week in his uniform before his shift at 2 a.m. to get ready. The former teacher and college football player from New York has been psyching himself up by watching "Rocky" movies and listening to AC/DC.

    "It's a huge motivator for me," he said.

    They'll alternate running 20-mile legs, while the other rests and rehydrates in a recreational vehicle that will pace them north on State Route 33. They'll have foods full of proteins and carbs — salmon and chicken for Cirrito — as well as Gatorade, soda and water. Rotating support teams will handle security, social media updates and logistics in utility vans that will leap frog along the route.

    Cirrito, a senior lead officer at the LAPD's Olympic Division, was inspired by his friend, Dominick Pezzulo, a former high school shop teacher who became a New York/New Jersey Port Authority officer in 2000. Pezzulo had been on the job one year when he was among the more than 70 officers killed when terrorists crashed hijacked planes into the World Trade Center towers on Sept. 11, 2001.

    It's been 16 years, but Cirrito still cries when talking about his friend.

    "I can't watch anything that deals with 9/11 without tearing up," he said. "I feel that it's also a driving force for me because he became my hero."

    Cirrito and Tudor hope to raise $10,000.

    They're ready. Last year, the two ran the 26-mile LA Marathon in full gear in under six hours.

    Tudor said her hips and thighs hurt, but she knows that a big part of running is mental. So she prepared by reading "Blink" by Malcolm Gladwell.

    "It relaxes me mentally, keeps my mind sharp," she said.

    Cirrito has kept to a strict diet of chicken and fish — no fast food, beer, or other meat.

    He'll stream music on his phone to keep him motivated through the run.

    "This is an honor for me," he said. "This has been a very tough year for law enforcement. The biggest thing about why I enjoy running in uniform is I get to talk to people. It's so important that people understand that we're human."



    Photo Credit: LAPD

    LAPD officers Joe Cirrito, third from left, and Kristina Tudor, right, run in the 2015 Los Angeles Marathon.LAPD officers Joe Cirrito, third from left, and Kristina Tudor, right, run in the 2015 Los Angeles Marathon.

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    For those of you participating in a politically themed secret Santa this year, President-elect Donald Trump's may have made the gift you were looking for -- budget permitting.

    The shop at donaldjtrump.com debuted a brass, 24-karat gold-finished "Make America Great Again" hat ornament for a cool $149.  

    "This ornament is sure to make any tree stand out," the product's description page states. 

    The ornament is ideal for the uncle sitting far-right at the dinner table, who will probably keep the decoration on display long after the holidays are over. The tiny red cap also doubles as the ultimate gag gift for your friend that is still hashtagging #notmypresident. 

    Campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks told the Daily News that the ornaments are made in the U.S. 

    If spending $149 on an ornament honoring a President-elect you don't or do support doesn't sit well with you, dozens of other sites are offering similar, less expensive options.

    Items sold on a campaign website are considered political donations in accordance with federal regulations. 



    Photo Credit: donaldjtrump.com

    "This ornament is sure to make any tree stand out," the description page for the "Make America Great Again" hat ornament states.

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    Getting to grandma's house for the Thanksgiving feast could be tricky for many Americans this year, NBC News reported. 

    Snow is in the forecast for the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and northern New York state, parts of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, and some sections of the Rocky Mountains, the National Weather Service reported Wednesday.

    The balmiest corner of the country will be the Southeast, where temperatures are expected to be 5 to 10 degrees above normal in Florida, Georgia, Alabama and the Carolinas.

    Meanwhile, the forecast high for Palm Beach, Florida, is 80 degrees when President-elect Donald Trump and his family sit down to carve up the turkey there.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

    In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, two women run through a snow flurry in Nashville, Tennessee.In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, two women run through a snow flurry in Nashville, Tennessee.

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    When the soon-to-be first family sits down for their Thanksgiving feast, they will be watched over by a contingent of at least 150 Secret Service personnel, NBC News reported. And when Donald Trump is sworn in as president on Jan. 20, that contingent will be 920 Secret Service agents and support personel in Washington, D.C., and New York City.

    The price tag for all that security is already very big, or as the Manhattan mogul might put it, "Yuge," internal Homeland Security and Secret Service documents reviewed by NBC News show.

    Right now the cost to taxpayers is more than $2 million daily, the documents show, a number that is sure to increase whenever the president or first lady travel — or when the threat level rises.

    Meanwhile, the New York Police Department is already handling external security at Trump Tower, the Manhattan home base of the President-elect, at an estimated cost of $1 million per day.



    Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

    President-elect Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Trump International Golf Club for a day of meetings on Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.President-elect Donald Trump waves as he arrives at Trump International Golf Club for a day of meetings on Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.

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    Cranberry bogs in Washington state produce solid hues of vibrant red each fall as one of the state's lesser-known crops is harvested in the months before Thanksgiving.

    This year's crop of about 194,000 barrels of cranberries puts the apple-giant state fifth in the U.S., according to federal estimates. Wisconsin and Massachusetts produce the bulk of the crop.

    Malcolm and Ardell McPhail have operated CranMac Farm for more than 35 years, one of the largest and oldest cranberry farms in Washington.

    Their harvest of about 1,000 tons of cranberries this year is slightly down from 2015, but Malcolm says new varieties are increasing the yield-per-acre from the peat-rich soil on his farm and others.

    The resulting surplus nationally has driven prices down, but McPhail says he's optimistic.

    "It's nice to grow a healthy crop," he said, adding, "We hardly eat a meal that we don't have cranberries."



    Photo Credit: AP

    Farmworker Felix Barrveta uses a paddle to move cranberries floating in a flooded cranberry bog during harvest on a farm owned by Malcolm and Ardell McPhail in Ilwaco, Washington, Oct. 11, 2016.Farmworker Felix Barrveta uses a paddle to move cranberries floating in a flooded cranberry bog during harvest on a farm owned by Malcolm and Ardell McPhail in Ilwaco, Washington, Oct. 11, 2016.

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  • 11/24/16--12:03: Black Friday Store Maps

  • Serious shoppers know that preparation is key in any Black Friday outing, and two major retailers just made planning your bargain bonanza a little bit easier. 

    Target and Walmart have both released detailed store maps of each of their locations in advance of the country's biggest shopping day of the year in an effort to help customers find deals more quickly and with ease. 

    To find the map of your local Target store, click here and enter your zip code. Once you select your preferred location, click "get store map" and a printable PDF map with each section labeled will pop up. The map also shows exactly where the store's advertised Black Friday deals will be located. 

    The process is similar on Walmart's website. To find your local store map, click here and enter your zip code. Select your store from the locations listed at the top of the site, and underneath click the "Weekly ads" link.

    [[401453145,C]]

    The store map can be found in the "Black Friday" ad, with a button to download a printable PDF at the top right. Walmart has also linked to each deal in their maps, and will have color-coded balloons to help shoppers expedite the process. 

    Most Target and Walmart stores around the country will open at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day and remain open throughout Black Friday. 

    [[402901536,C]]



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Shoppers load up their shopping baskets at Target on Black Friday in Hobart, Indiana.Shoppers load up their shopping baskets at Target on Black Friday in Hobart, Indiana.

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    An employee of Central Cellars in Grand Central Terminal was seriously burned when the e-cigarette in his pocket exploded into flames. Michael George looked into the story.

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    Millions of Americans will travel to visit family and friends and stuff themselves with turkey and pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving. But how much do you know about the holiday’s origins and why we celebrate? Test your knowledge of the history behind Turkey Day with this quiz.



    Photo Credit: AP

    A wild tom turkey spreads his tail and puffs out his feathers as he approaches a hen in a field in Zelienople, Pennsylvania, on May 2, 2015, the first day of Pennsylvania's Spring Gobbler hunting season.A wild tom turkey spreads his tail and puffs out his feathers as he approaches a hen in a field in Zelienople, Pennsylvania, on May 2, 2015, the first day of Pennsylvania's Spring Gobbler hunting season.

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    President-elect Donald Trump has had only two intelligence briefings since he won the election over two weeks ago, intelligence sources told NBC News Wednesday — a much lower number than his predecessors and lower even than Vice President-elect Mike Pence.

    A senior intelligence official cautioned that it is too early to know what the significance of Trump's sparse briefing schedule really is, given that he is in the middle of his transition process.

    While a team of intelligence analysts remains ready and waiting to deliver briefings to the president-elect, sources told NBC News he has accepted them only twice. Instead, Trump has turned the briefings down to focus on meetings with potential Cabinet members, media executives and business associates.

    Vice President-elect Mike Pence, on the other hand, has received the briefings nearly every day, the sources said.

    The news, first reported by the Washington Post, will likely fuel critics who've questioned Trump's knowledge of foreign affairs and national security issues.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump, left, calls out to media as he and Vice President-elect Mike Pence appear at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, in Bedminster, New Jersey.President-elect Donald Trump, left, calls out to media as he and Vice President-elect Mike Pence appear at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, in Bedminster, New Jersey.

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  • 11/24/16--12:27: --none--

  • Fights about politics at the Thanksgiving table are common, but this year they might get even more intense.

    According to Gallup, a record number of Americans feel like the country is divided right now, and in an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll before Election Day, six in ten respondents said that the campaigns had made them feel less proud to be American.

    Only 58 percent of Hillary Clinton supporters are willing to give Donald Trump "a chance to see how he governs," according to the polls. For those who can't resist talking politics over stuffing and pie, the conversation could get heated, especially in households where Republicans and Democrats share a meal. 



    Photo Credit: AP

    For those who can't resist talking politics over stuffing and pie, the conversation could get heated, especially in households where Republicans and Democrats share a meal.For those who can't resist talking politics over stuffing and pie, the conversation could get heated, especially in households where Republicans and Democrats share a meal.

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    The last thing on one New York woman's Thanksgiving shopping list? A selfie with Hillary Clinton at the grocery store.

    Brittany Valente, 25, bumped into Hillary, Bill, Chelsea and baby grandson Aiden at the Chappaqua Village Market on Wednesday and posted a photo to Instagram.

    She joked that Bill was "busy looking at cheese" while Hillary was taking pictures with everyone who asked.

    "They were so relaxed and shopping for Thanksgiving dinner at the local village market," Valente told NBC News. "They were so nice talking to everyone, wishing them happy holidays and at one point Hillary said 'We must stay strong together no matter what. Thank you for your support.'"

    Valente, a marketing manager at Convene, said she has seen the Clintons many times around town, but this time was special.

    "Turkey, sweet potatoes, cranberry, Hillary Clinton lol typical grocery shopping," she said.



    Photo Credit: Brittany Valente
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Hillary Clinton poses with Brittany Valente at the Chappaqua Village Market, where both were shopping for Thanksgiving food. (Credit: Brittany Valente)Hillary Clinton poses with Brittany Valente at the Chappaqua Village Market, where both were shopping for Thanksgiving food. (Credit: Brittany Valente)

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    Hina Naveed was 10 years old when her Pakistani parents brought her to the United States. They taught her never to talk about her immigration status because she's undocumented. 

    In 2013, Naveed received a grant from the New York Immigration Coalition to work for El Centro, an immigrant center in Staten Island. It was then that the 26-year-old became an outspoken advocate for immigrants' rights. After she graduates from nursing school later this year, she intends to pursue a law degree.

    But her plans could be jeopardized if Donald Trump gets rid of DACA as part of his immigration reform. President Obama’s 2012 executive action, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, protects individuals who came to the U.S. without documentation as minors and who have made a home here. Naveed has been covered by DACA since 2013.

    This week, Naveed traveled from Trump Tower in New York City to the White House in Washington, D.C., as part of the "Caravan of Courage," a movement organized by undocumented immigrants and allies to demand action from both Obama and the president-elect.

    Brought together by the New York-based advocacy group, Dream Action Coalition, the protesters made stops along their route to meet with others fighting for undocumented immigrants: dreamers in Maryland and New Jersey, and organizers against an ICE detention center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Their trip culminated with a press conference in front 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on Thanksgiving. 

    “If DACA is rescinded on Jan. 20, I have to inform my employer and I’m assuming get terminated because there’s no other way for me to continue working,” Naveed said. “I won’t be able to work as a nurse, because you definitely need legal status for that. My driver’s license expires in May, so I won’t be able to continue driving much longer. Financially, it’s going to be very difficult because if I don’t have any sort of income, the expenses are going to be building up.”

    Since Election Day, Trump has not elaborated on how he will handle DACA. In an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes," he said that he will first focus on deporting 2 to 3 million dangerous criminals, though a 2015 report by the Migration Policy Institute estimates that there are only 690,000 undocumented immigrants with felony charges or serious misdemeanors living in the U.S. After securing the border, Trump said he will craft his policy toward other undocumented immigrants, whom he called "terrific people." 

    NBC has reached out to Trump's transition team for comment about DACA, but has not heard back. 

    "We are undocumented, unafraid, and we are here to stay,” Cesar Vargas, co-director of Dream Action Coalition, said outside the White House gates Thursday. "This is the country that we call home.”

    The protesters chose to march on D.C. during the holiday because they wanted to remind citizens around the country that a mass deportation could mean that next year some families might not be able to celebrate together.

    “Look to the person on the left of you, on the right of you,” Naveed said. “Imagine now that they are no longer there because they were yanked out of your house because of some ticket they had years ago.”

    Naveed's family moved to the U.S. because her older sister had a medical issue: a knot in her brain threatened her life. Despite surgery, doctors said her condition was deteriorating, and there was nothing they could do to stop it. Naveed’s parents rejected this inevitability and her father sought solutions around the world. Finally, he brought his family to Long Island, and then to Boston, where his daughter was treated.

    But his lawyer misfiled the family’s request for a visa renewal, and it was denied, Naveed said. Then, their appeal was rejected. At Boston Children’s Hospital, doctors said that if Naveed’s sister returned to Pakistan, her illness might prove fatal. 

    Naveed’s father chose to overstay his visa so his daughter could continue treatment without interruption. Because of his decision, she is still alive 16 years after receiving a terminal diagnosis.

    “That was a happy ending, and unfortunately that also resulted in us becoming undocumented and falling out of status,” Naveed said.

    Ivy Teng Lei, a 26-year-old immigrant who moved to the U.S. from Macau when she was 7 and who participated in the press conference at Trump Tower on Tuesday, is the only undocumented member of her family. Her parents decided to come here in 1998 because of a failing education system and sparse jobs at home. Lei said her relatives feel guilty that she's having to live in fear of being sent back to Macau, a land she barely knows. Though she's trying to reassure them, she said, "I do want them to recognize that I am hurt.

    “I am extremely anxious all the time. I’m scared of being deported,” she added. “I don’t know what my future is going to look like, and I’m trying to look for as much support as possible so I’m not experiencing this in a vacuum.”

    Like Naveed, Lei is covered by DACA. As part of her education, she studied in a competitive vocational program that only accepted four applicants and until recently worked in global marketing. Like many undocumented immigrants, she pays taxes (undocumented immigrants pay $12 billion in taxes per year, according to Maria Teresa Kumar, president and CEO of Voto Latino) but is not eligible to receive government benefits. 

    If DACA is rescinded, Lei said she will “have to forgo all that I thought I could have in terms of my career.”

    “The feeling is like you are living in this reality that you just never liked, and you went to sleep and suddenly you have this perfect dream,” she said of DACA. “Everything was worthwhile. Everything you’ve worked for actually came to fruition. And then you woke up, and you’re kind of thinking, ‘Was that a good thing or was that a bad thing to have that dream?’

    “I still have these cry attacks where I’m walking on the street and someone will say something completely unrelated, but it’ll be like ‘what are you doing for the holidays?’ And it’s just like, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing for the rest of my life,’” she continued. 

    She said that it’s painful to live in “a country that just will not accept you, and will reject you like a bad organ transplant.”

    While attorneys say there are alternative paths to citizenship for people covered by DACA, like green card marriages, those take time to obtain. Naveed said she doesn't really have a plan B if DACA is rescinded.

    According to Naveed, most undocumented immigrants are as afraid of being arrested by ICE and held in detention centers as returning to their country. Immigrant holding cells are notorious for their cold, unsanitary, overcrowded conditions. Last week, the Department of Homeland Security reported that 41,000 undocumented immigrants were being held at detention facilities in the U.S. 

    “To send everyone back to Pakistan, Mexico, China, wherever is going to be difficult,” she said. “But I think that what is definitely very real is mass incarceration, and I think that that is just as scary, if not worse.

    “People are afraid to leave their houses, and they’re afraid to be open about their status, or to organize, or to rally, or to exercise their basic rights,” she continued.

    One of the "Caravan of Courage's" requests is that Obama considers closing detention centers in Texas and Pennsylvania and pardon those who are currently imprisoned for lack of documentation. 

    Naveed is marching on Washington to implore Trump “to alleviate those immediate fears that communities are facing” by saying he will not erect a deportation task force and by detailing his immigration reform plan. She also wants “to challenge those basic perceptions that people have” about undocumented immigrants by demonstrating that dreamers come from around the world, and from all different backgrounds. There is no cookie cutter undocumented immigrant.

    Lei echoed Naveed’s intentions, saying that she hoped to “encourage more Asian-Americans to stand out and talk about their stories” because a lot of people think of undocumented immigration as “just a Latino issue.”



    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Dream Action Coalition

    Ivy Teng Lei and Hina Naveed speak at Trump Tower on Nov. 22, 2016.Ivy Teng Lei and Hina Naveed speak at Trump Tower on Nov. 22, 2016.

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    Deep in the Sonoran Desert in Tuscan Arizona, you will find Marcia Lincoln and her turkey farm. Lincoln started breed the animals about eight years ago as a hobby. "You can get carried away hatching birds, maybe that's why I have over 200 turkeys," says Lincoln.

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    View daily updates on the best photos in domestic and foreign news.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Members of the U.S. 173rd Airborne Brigade attack a trench position during the Iron Sword multinational military exercises on Nov. 24, 2016, near Pabrade, Lithuania. Approximately 4,000 soldiers from NATO countries, including all three Baltic states as well as the USA, are participating in the two-week exercises. Many people in the three Baltic nations of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are concerned that Russia, because U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has expressed both admiration for Russian President Valdimir Putin and doubt over defending NATO member states, will be emboldened to intervene militarily in the Baltics. Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia are on the eastern geographic edge of NATO and close to Russia. All three countries have Russian minorities.Members of the U.S. 173rd Airborne Brigade attack a trench position during the Iron Sword multinational military exercises on Nov. 24, 2016, near Pabrade, Lithuania. Approximately 4,000 soldiers from NATO countries, including all three Baltic states as well as the USA, are participating in the two-week exercises. Many people in the three Baltic nations of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are concerned that Russia, because U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has expressed both admiration for Russian President Valdimir Putin and doubt over defending NATO member states, will be emboldened to intervene militarily in the Baltics. Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia are on the eastern geographic edge of NATO and close to Russia. All three countries have Russian minorities.

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    A 22-year-old man has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in San Diego to allegations he operated a drug smuggling ring through Facebook.

    Roberto Torres admitted to enlisting teenagers, some as young as 15, and young adults in the Imperial Valley to smuggle methamphetamine across the U.S., according to a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

    Prosecutors said Torres used Facebook to coordinate the drug operation, which transported narcotics from Mexico into the U.S.

    Several of Torres’ codefendants have already pleaded guilty in connection to the operation, including Genesis Flores De Anda, Hector Beltran-Garcia, Eleazar Sanchez-Aguilar and Diana Carrillo.

    Torres will be sentenced on Feb. 17. He faces between 10 years and life in prison.


    Cameras are not allowed in the courtroom.Cameras are not allowed in the courtroom.

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    Three men suffered numerous gunshot wounds Wednesday night outside a house in the Juniata section of Philadelphia when a driver of a car pulled up and opened fire, police said.

    The victims told police they were outside hanging Christmas lights on a house in the 4000 block of Howland Street. Shortly before 11 p.m., a driver slowly drove by them before stopping a short distance away. That's when the driver asked if any of the victims had struck his car at some point earlier, police said.

    An argument ensued, according to the victims, and the driver pulled a gun. He opened fire on the victims before driving off.

    A 28-year-old man suffered a bullet wound to his back, a 36-year-old man suffered a bullet wound to an arm and a 34-year-old man was struck twice in his midsection. All three were in stable condition at nearby hospitals, police said.

    A large, inflatable snowman could be seen shortly after the shooting at the scene. A bright light display accompanied the outdoor Christmas ornament.

    [[402901346, C]]

    The gunman is described as a black man in his 20s, with a light complexion, who wore a light gray knitted cap. he was accompanied by another black man in his 20s, with a darker complexion and shoulder-length hair, possibly dreadlocks.

    They were driving a dark gray Impala with tinted windows.



    Photo Credit: Jon Rodriguez/NBC10
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    An inflatable snowman adorns a row house in the 4000 block of Rowland Street where three men hanging Christmas lights were shot Wednesday, No. 23, 2016.An inflatable snowman adorns a row house in the 4000 block of Rowland Street where three men hanging Christmas lights were shot Wednesday, No. 23, 2016.

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