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    Some of Facebook's 1.8 billion users have recently received a $15 check from the social media giant in the mail, leaving many recipients scratching their heads. "Is this check real?"

    The answer is: Yes.

    The money comes from a class action lawsuit settlement over Facebook’s use of members' names and faces in “Sponsored Story” ads without their permission and without paying them.

    Fraley vs. Facebook was filed in April 2011. In their lawsuit, the five plaintiffs claimed Facebook improperly used photos and names of users in Sponsored Story ads, which are created by members “liking” companies’ pages or content. The plaintiffs also argued that Facebook violated a California law that forbids companies from using people’s likenesses or names in advertisements without their consent. Finally, the suit asserted that Facebook should have received parental consent to use the names and likeness of any user under the age of 18.

    After more than two years of deliberation, a U.S. federal judge in California approved a $20 million settlement in August 2013. Facebook also promised to give users more “control” over how their photos are used in ads.

    Facebook users were who filed to join the class action by the May 2, 2013 deadline were eligible to receive a payment.

    Third parties kept the case tied up in appeals court for years, but after those were finally resolved this year, the settlement awards were freed up to be distributed to Class Members, according to the class action's website.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    In this file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany.In this file photo, the Facebook logo is displayed at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany.

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    On the second anniversary of her son's death, Samaria Rice stood on the steps of the police headquarters in Cleveland, Ohio, and read out a list of demands, NBC News reports. 

    First, she said, fire the police officers who killed her 12-year-old son, Tamir. 

    "These two years have felt like hell and many sleepless nights, when I close my eyes to try to get some rest all I can see is my son getting shot," Rice said, later adding, "Our tax dollars are paying these killer p*gs." 

    Tamir Rice was shot and killed by police officers on Nov. 22, 2014. Video of the incident shows a police cruiser racing to the front of a recreation center and pulling up alongside the boy. One of the officers quickly fires two shots and the child crumples to the ground and dies. Rice had been brandishing a pellet gun.

    Samira Rice said that she had lost faith in the government, including the Obama administration, and its ability to protect children.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Courtesy Richardson & Kucharski Co., L.P.A.

    This undated photo provided by the family's attorney shows Tamir Rice. Rice, 12, was fatally shot by police in Cleveland, Ohio, after brandishing what turned out to be a replica gun, triggering an investigation into his death and a legislator's call for such weapons to be brightly colored or bear special markings.This undated photo provided by the family's attorney shows Tamir Rice. Rice, 12, was fatally shot by police in Cleveland, Ohio, after brandishing what turned out to be a replica gun, triggering an investigation into his death and a legislator's call for such weapons to be brightly colored or bear special markings.

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    A man has been arrested after four Boston Police officers were dragged by a vehicle early Wednesday morning.

    Police approached a vehicle on Stoughton Street in the Upham's Corner section of Boston's Dorchester neighborhood around 12:30 a.m. after receiving a report of a person with a gun.

    Police said the driver accelerated when asked to get out of the car and dragged two officers down the street. The car also struck two officers, causing them to fall to the ground. 

    A description of the car was put out, and police pursued it up Columbia Road before losing it in the area of Draper Street.

    The four injured officers were transported to Brigham and Women's Hospital with what were described as non-life-threatening injuries. They have since been treated and released.

    "We should be thankful for that considering what's going on in the world, across the United States, at this period of time right now," Boston Police Superintendent Randall Halstead said.

    At 10:20 a.m., police say they arrested 34-year-old Vincent Weaks of Roxbury. He faces four counts of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon. He'll be arraigned in court Friday.

    It was not immediately clear if he had an attorney.


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    A Florida woman who thought her house guests overstayed their welcome was arrested after she shot one of them, authorities said.

    Alana Annette Savell, 32, was arrested Monday on a charge of aggravated battery with a firearm, Bay County Sheriff's Office officials said.

    A woman told authorities that she had gone to Savell's home with a friend. Savell said they started drinking and were getting too loud, and said she didn't want them in her home.

    Savell armed herself with a handgun and started shooting at their feet from the doorway of the home, officials said. The woman was hit in the legs and was taken to a hospital for treatment. Savell's boyfriend was also hit in the leg with a bullet during the shooting, authorities said.

    The boyfriend allegedly told authorities that he told Savell that if someone is told to leave their property three times, she is to get the gun and shoot it at the ground. If that doesn't work, she's supposed to shoot them in the leg.

    Savell was booked into jail. It's unknown if she's hired an attorney.



    Photo Credit: Bay County Sheriff

    Alana Annette SavellAlana Annette Savell

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    U.N. human rights officials, whose boss famously likened U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to ISIS, are reported to be gearing up for a four- or even eight-year battle with the new administration over Trump's "ghastly campaign pledges," NBC News reported.

    With Trump now elected president, the U.N. high commissioner for human rights, Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein, has spread the word to the U.N. human rights office that it will have to lead international opposition to the United States, U.N. officials told the respected journal Foreign Policy.

    "We are going to speak up," Foreign Policy quoted one of the officials as saying in an article published Tuesday. "It'll be rough, but if [Trump] puts any of those ghastly campaign pledges into action, we will condemn."

    This is not the first time Ra'ad al-Hussein spoke out against Trump. "If Donald Trump is elected, on the basis of what he has said already, and unless that changes, I think it's without any doubt that he would be dangerous from an international point of view," he said in October.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena, File

    In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein speaks in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The U.N. human rights chief said on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, that U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump would be In this Feb. 9, 2016, file photo, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein speaks in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The U.N. human rights chief said on Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, that U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump would be "dangerous from an international point of view" if he is elected.

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    Take a look at how U.S. presidents honored the tradition of pardoning a turkey on Thanksgiving eve throughout the years.

    Photo Credit: AP

    President Barack Obama, joined by his nephews Aaron and Austin Robinson, pardons the National Thanksgiving Turkey, Tot,  on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016. The ceremony takes place annually in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. This is the 69th anniversary of the National Thanksgiving Turkey presentation.President Barack Obama, joined by his nephews Aaron and Austin Robinson, pardons the National Thanksgiving Turkey, Tot, on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016. The ceremony takes place annually in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. This is the 69th anniversary of the National Thanksgiving Turkey presentation.

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    Cassie DePecol is afraid of flying.

    "I'm not going to lie, even more than being kidnapped or killed, the flying, for me, is the most nerve-racking," she said. 

    But the anxiety isn't stopping the Connecticut-native from becoming the fastest person, as well as the first woman, to visit all 196 countries in the world. 

    DePecol, who is from Washington, said she didn't travel too much until she went to college. 

    "I studied abroad in Costa Rica," DePecol told NBC Connecticut while she was in the Congo on Tuesday. "Then after that, I saved up about $2,000 from lifeguarding and I traveled to about 25 countries over the course of two years." 

    The 27-year-old said she was living the "nomadic lifestyle" by backpacking, hitch-hiking and working odd-jobs abroad.

    "That’s when I realized how much I loved travel and I knew I’d find my career in travel," she said. 

    Now, DePecol is at the tail-end of her 196-country expedition that she started in July 2015, setting her up to become the first woman to travel the world in the least amount of time. 

    The trip isn't just about colorful sunsets, delicious cuisines and unparalleled selfies from atop of mountains; DePecol is a peace ambassador with the International Institute of Peace Through Tourism. 

    Through the organization's endorsement, DePecol is able to set up keynote sessions with students at universities in all the countries she is visiting. DePecol talks to students about a number of topics related to the environment and peace, including sustainable tourism, sustainable development, economics and entrepreneurship. 

    "It would be amazing to change the world in a major way and, of course, that’s my dream," DePecol said. "But I’m trying to take these small steps towards, eventually, changing the world in a more positive way — a more impactful way —for future generations."

    And DePecol isn't alone on wanting to make an impact. The world traveler has dozens of sponsors and supporters who back and help fund her mission. 

    Europe was the starting point of her journey, as a way to "ease into traveling again."

    "I hadn't traveled for a couple of years so I was a little bit rusty," DePecol said. "Those first six months were really tough for me."

    So far, her most memorable experience was in the small, Oceanic country Vanuatu. The country, which is in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, was devastated by a cyclone a year prior to DePecol's arrival.

    Despite the residents' struggles, they welcomed the American with open arms.

    "That was the first experience I was really thrown into humanity in a positive way," DePecol said. "I walked around the streets with my expensive camera slung over my shoulder and I was invited into these peoples' shack-houses and they wanted to show me their way of life and their family and how to make Kava, which is this specific drink to that region."

    Vanuatu was also one of the first places that DePecol spoke to a group of more than a hundred students. 

    "I wasn’t really that confident with speaking and didn’t really know what I was talking about at that point, but they understood me and we laughed and we really understood each other, even though we come from completely different lands," she said. 

    The Middle East was another place that surprisingly resonated with DePecol, who said she feels the "safest and most comfortable" in the region. 

    "It’s just completely not what you see on the news all the time, all this negative stuff," she said. "It's a whole different thing that is so beautiful."

    But DePecol is quick to say she is not relocating to a Middle Eastern country, or anywhere abroad, once the expedition is over. 

    "The more I travel, the more I realize that States is where I belong," she said. 

    DePecol still has 13 countries to get to before breaking the Guinness World record for fastest time to visit all countries, which was previously completed by Yili Lui within three years and three months

    According to DePecol, she is on track to break that record by finishing her travels within 16 months, making her the first documented woman to ever do so.

    Up next, the explorer said she is most excited to visit Pakistan after it took four months to get her visa approved. 

    "I plan my travels around visas, student meetings and weather patterns," she said. 

    DePecol will move back to Los Angeles, where she was living previously, when she finishes her around-the-world expedition. She is planning on finishing her documentary, her book and will speak at universities in the area.

    She said she already has a long list of places she wants to revisit. 



    Photo Credit: Cassie DePecol

    Cassie DePecol pictured on a beach in Uruguay.Cassie DePecol pictured on a beach in Uruguay.

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    A mother in Chattanooga whose daughter died in a fatal school bus accident Monday says she repeatedly complained about the bus driver responsible, NBC News reported.

    Jasmine Mateen says she complained about the bus driver to the Board of Education, the school and the bus company, Durham School Services, after her children complained about him.

    Mateen, who also had two children injured in the accident, said she reminded the school that she complained about the driver when they called her Tuesday.

    "I've been calling y'all since August," Mateen said she told them. "I said, 'Now y'all doing what y'all supposed to been doing now that it's too late ... Y'all doing what y'all supposed to be doing, but my baby laying in a cold freezer.'"

    The bus driver, Johnthony Walker, 24, was charged with vehicular homicide, reckless endangerment and reckless driving following Monday’s accident.



    Photo Credit: Chattanooga Fire Department
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Firefighters remove victims from a school bus that crashed in Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Nov. 21, 2016. The mother of a girl killed in the accident says she's complained about the bus driver before.Firefighters remove victims from a school bus that crashed in Chattanooga, Tennessee, on Nov. 21, 2016. The mother of a girl killed in the accident says she's complained about the bus driver before.

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    South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley accepted President-elect Donald Trump's offer to be his ambassador to the United Nations, Trump's transition team announced Wednesday.

    Haley, 44, is the daughter of immigrants from India and is only America's second Asian-American governor.

    Trump said in a statement that Haley "has a proven track record of bringing people together regardless of background or party affiliation to move critical policies forward for the betterment of her state and our country."

    The two-term governor was not always on Trump's side. She initially backed his rivals, Sen. Marco Rubio and then Sen. Ted Cruz, during the GOP primary. In February, she said Trump was "everything a governor doesn't want in a president," but in July she announced she would vote for him. 

    “Our country faces enormous challenges here at home and internationally, and I am honored that the President-elect has asked me to join his team and serve the country we love as the next Ambassador to the United Nations,” Haley said Wednesday.



    Photo Credit: AP

    South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks to the crowd at the Kemp Forum, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, in Columbia, S.C.South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley speaks to the crowd at the Kemp Forum, Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016, in Columbia, S.C.

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    Hateful notes and emails allegedly sent to a North Park University student were “fabricated,” the school’s president said Tuesday in a statement, and the woman who claimed they were aimed toward her is no longer enrolled at the school.

    “We are confident there is no further threat of repeated intolerance to any member of our campus community stemming from this recent incident,” the university’s President David Parkyn said in a statement.

    The student, Taylor Volk, said on Nov. 14 she had received emails and notes taped to her door containing harassing, threatening language and mentions of President-elect Donald Trump. She had also posted pictures of notes with homophobic slurs to her Facebook account.

    Volk and school officials did not immediately respond to request for comment.

    Volk said at the time she was confident North Park was investigating the matter, although the school would not comment directly on the notes to NBC 5. The university’s marketing director, Chris Childers, said in a phone interview earlier this month “any incident that is reported to North Park is taken extremely seriously.”

    A Chicago Police official said on Nov. 14 they could not find any report about the incident.

    “When student safety is compromised, and when institutional values are not maintained, we will respond with resolve as we did in the most recent incident,” Parkyn said. “Additionally, we ask members of the community to reflect our institutional ethos and commitment in our interpersonal relationships—through inclusion, civility, dialogue, respect, hospitality, and a mutual love for God and all people.”

    North Park's campus is located in Chicago's Albany Park neighborhood, noted for its diversity as an immigrant gateway community, on the city's Northwest Side.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center said that there were 701 hateful incidents of harassment reported around the country in the week since the presidential election, though not all reports were verified. About 65 percent of the incidents were from the first three days following the election, and there has been a steady drop-off since, the hate-tracking group said. 

    Trump has called for people to stop such displays. 



    Photo Credit: NBC 5

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    Elizabeth Thompson can't wait to leave the big city behind and decompress over the Thanksgiving holiday at her grandmother's house in rural south-central Indiana. But first she has to get there.

    On Wednesday, Thompson, 23, missed her Amtrak train from Chicago to Galesburg, Illinois, where she'd planned to catch a ride with a family member the rest of the way to Edinburgh, Indiana.

    "It's just where we go to unplug and escape," said Thompson, who had to decide whether to wait several hours for the next train or hop on a bus and get going.

    Americans took to the roads, air and railways Wednesday for what is expected to be the busiest Thanksgiving travel period in almost a decade. Almost 49 million people are expected to travel 50 miles or more between Wednesday and Sunday, the most since 2007, because of lower gas prices and an improving economy, according to AAA.

    And while they look forward to eating turkey and watching football, many are ready to abandon another, more recent, American pastime: rehashing the rancorous election between Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

    "My mother specifically said, 'We're not going to talk about it,'" for her grandmother's sake, Thompson said. Although nobody in her family supported Trump, "my grandmother is sick of hearing about it."

    Kevin Baumann, a 47-year-old boilermaker from Spokane, Washington, is able to join his family for Thanksgiving for the first time in two years, so politics was the last thing he wanted to discuss.

    "We'll avoid it," said Baumann, who stopped in central Montana Tuesday on his way home, after working on a coal plant in Iowa. "We've got bigger things to talk about during the holidays."

    James Arnold, 18, a freshman at Eastern University near Philadelphia, expects that the election will be a big topic of conversation during Thanksgiving dinner at his family's home in Silver Spring, Maryland.

    "My family loves to talk about things together and the election is something huge," he said Tuesday while waiting for a train.

    "Every holiday they sit down and talk about things like that," he added. "It's going to be interesting."

    The weather appeared to be cooperating for the most part, with no significant issues, National Weather Service meteorologist Amy Seeley said. There was light rain in Chicago, a major airline hub, but delays were only averaging 15 minutes, according to the Chicago Department of Aviation.

    "It looks pretty quiet across the country today; I'll take it," Seeley said.

    For those who didn't want to drive, Amtrak was adding some extra trains Wednesday and Sunday between Chicago and Milwaukee, its biggest Midwest corridor, spokesman Marc Magliari said. Some Midwest trains have been sold out for several days, he said.

    Amtrak CEO Wick Moorman said the railroad was prepared to handle extra riders.

    "This is a day when we need everything to go right in order to not have a serious issue with delays, with folks being backed up into stations," Moorman told reporters at New York's Pennsylvania Station. "Knock on wood when I say this, everything's going well."

    AP reporters Karen Matthews, Matthew Brown and Maryclaire Dale contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: AP
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    File photo: In this Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015, travelers line up at a security checkpoint area in Terminal 3 at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.File photo: In this Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015, travelers line up at a security checkpoint area in Terminal 3 at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.

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    1st in SEO, an internet-marketing business based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is refusing to do business with Donald Trump supporters. A blog post titled "Trump Supporters' Client Accounts Canceled" posted on Nov. 11, 2016 announced that the company will "no longer do business with any person that is a registered Republican or supports Donald Trump."

    Photo Credit: KOB

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    President-elect Donald Trump adds South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley to his cabinet Wednesday, after Haley accepted the post of ambassador to the United Nations on Nov. 23, 2016. Other contenders include former GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney for Secretary of State, as well as Dr. Ben Carson for Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

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    President-elect Donald Trump release a video statement on Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016, asking Americans to unify in the spirit of Thanksgiving.

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  • 11/23/16--18:45: Navy Sailor Info Compromised

  • Private, sensitive information of more than 130,000 current and former sailors was accessed by unknown individuals in a security breach, the United States Navy announced Wednesday. 

    On October 27, internet technology firm Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services notified the Navy that one of the company's laptops, which was supporting a Navy contract, was reported compromised, according to a statement from the Navy. 

    An investigation by the firm and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service revealed by November 22 that 134,386 current and former sailors' sensitive information, including names and Social Security numbers, were accessed by unknown individuals, according to the Navy.

    There is not yet evidence to suggest misuse of compromised information, the Navy said.

    "The Navy takes this incident extremely seriously- this is a matter of trust for our Sailors," said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Robert Burke in a statement. "We are in the early stages of investigating and are working quickly to identify and take care of those affected by this breach."

    Affected sailors will be notified in coming weeks, and can expect the Navy to reach out, including by phone call, letter and email, the Navy said. 

    The Navy is working to provide further details on what happened to the sailors who were affected and is reviewing credit monitoring service options for them. 

    No other information was immediately available.

    Check back for updates on this breaking news story. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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    Holiday-makers frustrated with present shopping can put a new spin on an old tradition by gifting trips and experiences instead of objects this season.

    Photo Credit: NBC News

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    Despite losing the presidential election to Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton now has more than 2 million more votes than him, NBC News reported.

    According to an ongoing tally by Cook Political Report’s David Wasserman, Hillary Clinton's vote total is 64,223,986 (48.1 percent of the vote), while Trump's is 62,206,395 (46.6 percent) - a difference of 2,017,591 votes. Clinton’s vote total is nearing the 65.9 million votes Barack Obama won in 2012.

    Wasserman’s statistics also revealed that Trump beat Clinton in 13 swing states by a margin of 48.5 percent to 46.6 percent. In the non-swing states, though, Clinton is ahead of Trump 48.9 percent to 45.6 percent.

    Trump won the electoral college, 306-232.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton, pauses as she concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on Nov. 9, 2016, in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton, pauses as she concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on Nov. 9, 2016, in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.

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  • 11/23/16--14:26: Fake News Stanford Study

  • A disturbing new study from Stanford shows most students don’t know when news is fake.

    Researchers from Stanford University’s Education Department found teenagers and college students were not only getting their news from internet sources like Facebook and Twitter but a majority of them were unable to sort fact from fiction.

    One of the tests included a picture from a photo sharing site of irregularly shaped daisies with the caption “Fukushima Nuclear Flowers.”

    Researchers at Stanford sent that picture to 170 high school students around the country, asking: "Does this photo provide strong evidence about conditions near the Fukushima nuclear plant?"

    There was no proof the photo was taken at Fukushima or even Japan - no proof that the plants were exposed to radioactivity.

    “So there’s lots of problems and most students - the vast majority - noticed none of those problems,” said Sarah McGrew, co-director of the Stanford study.

    One student responded that it does provide strong evidence because it shows how the small and beautiful things were affected greatly. Eighty percent of high school students accepted the picture as proof.

    Another test was a title page from The Atlantic touting an article on climate change. And from the same website an ad by Shell Oil talking about climate change.

    Two-hundred students were asked which article seemed more reliable. Seventy percent of those students said the article sponsored by Shell was the more reliable source.

    What drew them in was the look of the Shell graph: It looked professional.

    One student wrote: “I think Article B is a more reliable source because it says sponsored by Shell and big companies wouldn’t just sponsor anything.”

    Another test was a tweet from MoveOn.org stating new polling shows the NRA is out of touch with gun owners.

    “And then we asked students what makes the tweet a useful source and a less useful source,” McGrew said.

    Eighty percent of the college students surveyed didn’t notice the source of the polling and two-thirds didn’t notice that a progressive organization like Move On tweeting about the NRA might be something you’d want to think twice about.

    “Again completely ignoring the source of information,” McGrew said.

    The study surveyed 7,800 students from all over the country.

    And the take away about the vast majority of those middle, high school and college students?

    “They use social media very fluently but when it comes to evaluating information they encounter, the overall picture that we got was very bleak,” said Teresa Ortega, the study’s co-director.

    The one bright spot in this study is that the same researchers are now working on curriculum to teach critical thinking to students.

    Facebook has been in the news recently for trying to address its fake news problem. CEO Mark Zuckerberg recently said at a trade summit in Peru that his company was taking measures to curb what he called was a "relatively small" percentage of deliberately false stories.

    Critics complained that the surge in bogus news stories on Facebook may have led to a Trump win in the 2016 elections. Google also acknowledged that it let a fake news story slip into its list of recommendations for election stories.

    For the executive summary of the Stanford study, click here.



    Photo Credit: NBC Bay Area, File
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    File image of the Stanford campus.File image of the Stanford campus.

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    Just a few days before Black Friday discounts kick off the holiday shopping season, a conservative "watchdog for corporate activism" has called for a boycott against Target for the remainder of the year.

    It's the latest in a bit of backlash directed at the retail chain, NBC News reported. The scuffle started over a single sentence included in the company's April 19 news release that clarified its stance on LGBTQ equality: "We welcome transgender team members and guests to use the restroom or fitting room facility that corresponds with their gender identity." 

    Now, conservative watchdog group 2nd Vote is asking people to shop #AnywhereButTarget. The group released a petition along with a social media campaign and a video in which Executive Director Lance Wray accuses Target of "putting its radical politics above common sense or safety."

    Target did not issue a public response to the 2nd Vote boycott, but did announce on its website that stores would open to Black Friday shoppers at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving night.



    Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images, FIle

    Shopping carts sit in front of a Target store in San Rafael, California.Shopping carts sit in front of a Target store in San Rafael, California.

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    A former Massachusetts prosecutor has been charged with rape, court officials confirmed Wednesday.

    Gary Zerola faces two counts of rape from an incident that allegedly happened Nov. 10.

    Not many details being released, but the commonwealth says there will be strong medical evidence.

    The Boston lawyer is no stranger to these kind of charges. In fact, this is his fourth time. But he has beaten all of them in the past, and his attorney says the latest accusations are based on "a foundation of lies."

    In 2008, Zerola was acquitted in two rape cases out of Boston and had another dropped in Florida.

    The former top prosecutor was also once one of People Magazine's top bachelors.

    But any other details of what the bachelor is accused of doing this time have been sealed. A document shows that the judge impounded it to protect the identity of the alleged victim.

    Zerola has been held on $10,000 bail. He will be fitted with a GPS monitor Monday.

    Zerola's attorney, Joseph Krowski, said the case "is nothing more than a target in this case," and that the case is "based upon a foundation of lies and we vigorously look forward to our day in court."



    Photo Credit: necn, file

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