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US and World News

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    President-elect Donald Trump tweeted about his meeting on Saturday with retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, calling the general "impressive." 

    Trump referred to the general by his nickname, "Mad Dog Mattis," and said the four-star was being considered for defense secretary.

    Trump first complained Sunday on Twitter about Saturday Night Live and the Broadway play "Hamilton." He then tweeted that Mattis "was very impressive yesterday. A true General's General!"



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis as he leaves Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J., Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016.President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis as he leaves Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J., Saturday, Nov. 19, 2016.

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    Incoming White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said Sunday on NBC's "Meet The Press" that President-elect Donald Trump's team is not planning to create a Muslim registry, but would not rule anything out.

    "Look I'm not going to rule out anything," Priebus said. "We're not going to have a registry based on a religion. But what I think what we're trying to do is say that there are some people, certainly not all people... there are some people that are radicalized. And there are some people that have to be prevented from coming into this country. And Donald Trump's position, President Trump's position is consistent with bills in the House and the Senate that say the following: If you want to come from a place or an area around the world that harbors and trains terrorists, we have to temporarily suspend that operation until a better vetting system is put in place."

    Priebus further maintained that tougher screening was needed before the incoming administration could consider immigration.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Reince Priebus and Donald Trump on Election Day.Reince Priebus and Donald Trump on Election Day.

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    Sabra Dipping Company has issued a voluntary recall for a variety of its hummus products after Listeria monocytogenes was found at the Colonial Heights, Virginia-based company's manufacturing facility.

    The recall affects hummus products that were made before Nov. 8, 2016, and sold across the United States and Canada at supermarkets and other stores.

    Listeria monocytogenes was not found in tested finished product. Sabra said Saturday that its recall was issued out of an abundance of caution.

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The species of bacteria can result in stillbirths or miscarriages among pregnant women.

    Healthy people may experience short-term symptoms including high fever, severe headaches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

    The recalled products include a range across Sabra's line like hummus with red pepper, garlic, lemon, spinach and artichoke, and more.

    Sabra products not included in the recall are: Sabra Organic Hummus, Sabra Salsa, Sabra Guacamole and Sabra Greek Yogurt Dips.

    Consumers with a "best before" date up through Jan. 23, 2017, on the lid of these hummus items should discard the product:

    • Sabra Hummus Caramelized Onion 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 7OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 30OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 5LB – 6ct
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 2OZ – 48ct: 3 x (16 x 2oz)
    • Sabra Hummus Classic with pretzels 4.56OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 7OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 30OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic with pretzels 4.56OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Jalapeno 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Olive 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Pine Nut 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Pine Nut 7OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Pine Nut 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Pine Nut 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 7OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 30OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 5LB – 6ct
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper with pretzels 4.56OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Supremely Spicy 7OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Supremely Spicy 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Supremely Spicy 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Spinach & Artichoke 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Sun Dried Tomato 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Spinach & Artichoke 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Spinach & Artichoke 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Pine Nut 17OZ – 6ct
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 17OZ – 6ct
    • Sabra Hummus Basil-Pesto 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Tuscan Herb Garden 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 32OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic with pretzels 4.56OZ – 8ct
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 23.5OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Bold & Spicy with tortilla chips 4.56OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Garlic 17OZ – 6ct
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 2OZ – 6 x 2oz (12 x 6pks)
    • Sabra Hummus Lemon 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Red Pepper 2OZ – 6 x 2oz (12 x 6pks)
    • Sabra Hummus Tuscan Herb Garden 17OZ
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 2OZ – 16 x 2oz – 12 ct
    • Sabra Hummus Classic 2OZ – 12 x 2oz – 12 ct
    • Sabra Hummus SF Rosemary/Sea Salt 10OZ
    • Sabra Spreads Spicy Chili 8.5OZ – 8ct
    • Sabra Spreads Garlic Herb 8.5OZ – 8ct
    • Sabra Spreads Honey Mustard 8.5OZ – 8ct
    • Sabra Spreads Salt & Pepper 8.5OZ – 8ct
    • Sabra Hummus Taco 10OZ
    • Sabra Hummus 3 Pepper Chili 10OZ

    Consumers can reach Sabra Consumer Relations at 1-866-265-6761 for from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET or visit www.sabrahummusrecall.com for information on being reimbursed. 

    For more information, click here.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    A file photo of  a tub of Sabra hummusA file photo of a tub of Sabra hummus

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    Hundreds of New Yorkers came together to protest hate messages and offensive symbols Sunday at a Brooklyn Heights park that is named after a late Beastie Boys star. 

    Comptroller Scott Stringer, New York Sen. Daniel Squadron and Beastie Boys member Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz were among the large crowd who flooded Adam Yauch Park to spread messages of love and unity days after playground equipment was defaced with two swastikas and a pro-Trump message. 

    "Offensive symbols and discrimination have no place in our city," Stringer said. "Especially in our playgrouds and in front of our kids."

    Adam "MCA" Yauch was Jewish. The Beastie Boys star died from cancer in 2012.

    Public Advocate Letitia James joined protesters in a rendition of "This Land is Your Land" with  as others carried signs with slogans like "We Gotta Fight for Our Rights" and "Love Wins." Two men played snare drums to the tune of the song.

    Visitors laid flowers near the park entrance as a peace offering in an effort to put messages of hate to rest. The metal locomotive jungle gym showed no trace of the offensive graffiti as kids played on the park's recreational equipment.

    Horovitz was upset that someone defaced the playground dedicated to his late friend, but was glad to see so many come together to protest against the disrespectful actions.

    "Everybody that heard about this came out," he said, smiling. "We got old friends and new friends."

    Among those old friends was actor Ben Stiller, who said the singular event is representative of a larger wave of hate crimes that have taken place in recent times. 

    "It's important for us to stand up and say it's not all right," he said. "It's important for the president-elect to say it's not okay, too."

    Stiller called on President-elect Donald Trump to take a stand against the acts of intimidation happening across the country.

    Amid reports of a spike in acts of hate or intimidation, Trump said in a Nov. 13 interview on CBS' "60 Minutes" that he did not hear about the violence and harassment in his name or in some cases directed at his supporters, other than "one or two instances." 

    He added: "I am so saddened to hear that. And I say, “Stop it.” If it -- if it helps. I will say this, and I will say right to the cameras: Stop it."  

    The Southern Poverty Law Center said that there were 701 hateful incidents of harassment reported around the country in the week since the presidential election, though not all reports have been verified. About 65 percent of the incidents were from the first three days following the election, and there has been a steady drop-off since, the hate-tracking group said.  

    The Sunday afternoon rally in Brooklyn Heights is one of several that have taken place throughout the city protesting hate speech and offensive symbols. According to the NYPD, police are investigating 31 percent more hate crimes this year compared to 2015.


    New York State Senator Daniel Squadron, Beastie Boys member Adam New York State Senator Daniel Squadron, Beastie Boys member Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz, and Comptroller Scott Stringer were among the hundreds who rallied against hate speech and offensive symbols in Adam Yauch Park. Swastikas were painted onto playground equipment at the park on Friday.

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    Protesters gathered outside a hotel in midtown Manhattan on Sunday night as they awaited President-elect Donald Trump’s newly appointed Chief Strategist Steve Bannon.

    The group blocked access to the entrance of the Grand Hyatt hotel, where Bannon was expected to attend the 2016 Zionist Organization of America's annual gala. It’s unclear if he ever showed up.

    The group IfNotNow helped organize the protest and many in the crowd were young and Jewish. On social media the group boasted that up to "700 Jews" prevented Bannon from speaking at the gala.

    They argued that Bannon is an anti-Semite — a charge that the Trump transition team has repeatedly denied.

    Bannon, 62, is one of Trump’s most controversial hires. He joined Trump's campaign as CEO in August after serving as the head of Breitbart News — a far-right outlet that is one of Trump's biggest backers.

    Bannon, onetime Breitbart News chief, worked for Goldman Sachs, then started his own media-focused boutique investment banking firm. After selling the business, he became a film producer, which introduced him to conservative publisher Andrew Breitbart and author Peter Schweizer. Bannon led the Breitbart website, which has been widely condemned as racist, sexist and anti-Semitic.

    But the Anti-Defamation League, while addressing Breitbart's inflammatory stance under Bannon's guidance, observed that Bannon has never made any anti-Semitic remarks.

    "While there is a long fact pattern of evidence that Breitbart served as a platform for a wide range of bigotry and there is some controversy related to statements from Mr. Bannon’s divorce proceedings in 2007, we are not aware of any anti-Semitic statements made by Bannon himself," the organization said in a statement.

    Bannon's ex-wife claimed in a 2007 divorce filing, though, that he made three separate anti-Semitic comments when they fought over which private school to send their kids nearly a decade ago in Los Angeles, NBC News reported. Bannon has denied the allegation.

    Jewish groups and a long list of Democratic leaders have denounced Bannon's hiring and called on Trump to reconsider.

    Trump Tower was also the scene of a rally on Sunday. Supporters of Trump held signs of approval for the president-elect. At one point they came face-to-face with a large group of anti-Trump demonstrators. Police used barricades to keep the peace. 

    On Sunday, Trump met with more than a dozen potential cabinate appointees at his western New Jersey golf club, Trump National Golf Club.

    “Great people coming, you’ll see,” Trump said.

    Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence met with Rudy Giuliani and Gov. Chris Christie but made no announcements Sunday.

    Meetings will carry on at Trump Tower on Monday and Tuesday as Trump continues his transition into the White House.



    Photo Credit: NBC New York

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    The stunning election of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump set off protests in some U.S. cities.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Beastie Boys member Adam Horovitz speaks at a anti-hate rally at a Brooklyn park named in memory of Beastie Boys band member Adam Yauch after it was defaced with swastikas on Nov. 20, 2016, in New York City. On Friday, the park and playground was spray-painted with swastikas and the message Beastie Boys member Adam Horovitz speaks at a anti-hate rally at a Brooklyn park named in memory of Beastie Boys band member Adam Yauch after it was defaced with swastikas on Nov. 20, 2016, in New York City. On Friday, the park and playground was spray-painted with swastikas and the message "Go Trump." Hundreds of people, many with their children, listened to community leaders and condemn racism and intolerance. Following the election of Donald Trump as president, there has been a surge of incidents of racist activities reported.

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    A man was arrested after disrupting a performance of the musical "Hamilton" in Chicago on Saturday night, reportedly screaming obscenities in support of President-elect Donald Trump.

    John Palmer, 56, was taken into custody around 9:30 p.m. at the PrivateBank Theatre, located at 18 W. Monroe St. in the city's Loop, according to police.

    Palmer, of the 100 block of E. Illinois St. in Chicago, began "causing a disturbance" and was asked to leave by the theatre's staff, authorities said. He refused and was detained by security until officers arrived and placed him under arrest.

    Palmer was charged with one misdemeanor count of criminal trespass to land, Chicago police said.

    According to multiple reports, Palmer appeared intoxicated and began screaming things like, "Our side won! You lost! Get over it!" as well as several profanities.

    The incident was reportedly sparked by cheers at the line "Immigrants - we get the job done" in the song "Yorktown (The World Turned Upside Down)."

    Audience members left the auditorium to ask staff to remove Palmer, according to BroadwayWorld.com, who then struggled with security for "at least two numbers."

    Several audience members took to social media to describe the outburst, adding that Palmer was also threatening those around him.

    "This is why we train," actress Karen Olivo, who plays Angelica in the production, tweeted Sunday. "So when the obstacles come we conquer them with skill and precision."

    Broadway in Chicago did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    The incident came just one day after controversy surrounded Vice President-elect Mike Pence's attendance of "Hamilton" in New York City.

    Pence drew boos and some support from the audience as he walked to his seat before the show on Friday night. Following the performance, the cast addressed Pence directly in a statement for which Trump demanded an apology. 

    "We, sir, we are the diverse America who are alarmed and anxious that your new administration will not protect us, our planet, our children, our parents, or defend us and uphold our unalienable rights, sir," actor Brandon Victor Dixon said, adding, "But we truly hope this show has inspired you to uphold our American values and to work on behalf of all of us.”

    Trump took issue with the speech on Twitter, claiming Pence was "harassed" and calling for the cast and producers to apologize "for their terrible behavior."

    Pence, however, said Sunday that he wasn't offended by the cast's speech, and said he would "leave it to others whether that was the appropriate venue to say it" when asked if he thought an apology was necessary. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Actor Leslie Odom, Jr. (L) and actor, composer Lin-Manuel Miranda (R) perform on stage during 'Hamilton' GRAMMY performance for The 58th GRAMMY Awards at Richard Rodgers Theater on February 15, 2016 in New York City.Actor Leslie Odom, Jr. (L) and actor, composer Lin-Manuel Miranda (R) perform on stage during 'Hamilton' GRAMMY performance for The 58th GRAMMY Awards at Richard Rodgers Theater on February 15, 2016 in New York City.

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    President-elect Trump interviewed more than a dozen candidates for his administration at his New Jersey golf club over the weekend, including Mitt Romney, Rudy Guliani, Chris Christie and Kansas secretary of state Kris Kobach, who has been tough on immigration, and others.

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    Hillary Clinton may be fading from public view, but Bernie Sanders is staying firmly in the spotlight, and the progressive organizations and operatives who rallied around his presidential campaign feel like they are finally a force in the Democratic Party, NBC News reports.

    Sanders is now in the Democratic leadership in the Senate, while one of his allies is a front-runner to be the next chairman of the Democratic Party. The Vermont senator is also on a book tour, and everyone seems to want his opinion on the election, in part because he beat Clinton in many of the key Midwestern counties she lost to Donald Trump.

    Meanwhile, the digital firm that helped Sanders raise more than $200 million in small donations is reaching out to out-of-work Clinton staffers, and his network of progressive activists is gearing up to resist Trump's policies.

    "This is the political revolution. It's here," said Winnie Wong, an Occupy Wall Street activist who started the group People for Bernie. "What we know is that the Bernie Mafia feels confident and united."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Sen. Bernie Sanders, (I-VT), speaks during a rally on Capitol Hill, November 17, 2016, in Washington, D.C. The groups National Nurses United and Progressive Democrats of America held the Sen. Bernie Sanders, (I-VT), speaks during a rally on Capitol Hill, November 17, 2016, in Washington, D.C. The groups National Nurses United and Progressive Democrats of America held the "People's Rally" to "demand economic and social justice and equality." (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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    A woman was seriously injured after being dragged by her neck through the German town of Hamelin Sunday, NBC News reported.

    A 38-year-old suspect turned himself in at a police station around the same time the woman, 28, was found on a sidewalk, according to a police statement issued Monday.

    The woman was airlifted to a medical center near the northwest German town, according to the police. She had been tied by the neck to the trailer-hook of the car.

    The suspect allegedly admitted to the crime, but didn't give a motive.



    Photo Credit: Police handout

    Police in Hamelin, Germany, investigate after a woman was dragged through the streets of the town behind a car on Sunday, November 20, 2016.Police in Hamelin, Germany, investigate after a woman was dragged through the streets of the town behind a car on Sunday, November 20, 2016.

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    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Admirers of Princess Diana will get a reminder of her iconic style in an exhibit that goes on display in Kensington Palace in London next year.

    "Diana: Her Fashion Story" opens in February 2017, nearly 20 years after her death.

    One of the many treasured pieces is a Victor Edelstein ink-blue velvet gown, which the Princess of Wales famously wore at the White House when she danced with John Travolta.

    Diana once resided in Kensington Palace and often stopped to greet the gardeners. In addition to seeing the suits, dresses, florals and colorful prints she was known for, a special white garden will be planted in her honor and inspired by her style.

    The royal website said the exhibit will "trace the evolution of the Princess’s style, from the demure, romantic outfits of her first public appearances, to the glamour, elegance and confidence of her later life. From her earliest royal engagements, everything Diana wore was closely scrutinized, and the exhibition will explore how she navigated her unique position in the public eye: learning to use her image to engage and inspire people, and to champion the causes she cared about."

    Tickets to the Princess Diana exhibit will be included in the palace admission price and will be available to buy online starting Dec. 1.



    Photo Credit: AP
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    In this photo provided by Historic Royal Palaces, a conservator handles a blue tartan jacket designed by the Emanuels which was worn by Princess Diana during an official visit to Venice in 1985.In this photo provided by Historic Royal Palaces, a conservator handles a blue tartan jacket designed by the Emanuels which was worn by Princess Diana during an official visit to Venice in 1985.

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    Amid reports that diplomats are staying at President-elect Donald Trump's newly opened hotel in Washington, D.C., to curry favor, commentators are warning of potential conflicts of interest over Trump's business empire, NBC News reports.

    The impression that Trump could be mixing business with politics recalls his criticism of Hillary Clinton and the Clinton Foundation, which he alleged gave access and special favors to donors.

    Now, the conservative Wall Street Journal editorial page is recommending that Trump liquidate his stake in his company to avoid any possible problems.

    Soon-to-be Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said on Meet the Press that potential conflicts were being evaluated and that the White House Counsel's office would be involved with any decisions.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Donald Trump, together with his family, from left, Eric Trump, Trump, Melania Trump, Tiffany Trump and Ivanka Trump, speaks in the hotel lobby, during the grand opening of Trump International Hotel in Washington, on Oct. 26, 2016. Donald Trump, in the middle of his campaign for president, and his children hosted an official ribbon cutting ceremony and press conference to celebrate the grand opening of his new hotel.Donald Trump, together with his family, from left, Eric Trump, Trump, Melania Trump, Tiffany Trump and Ivanka Trump, speaks in the hotel lobby, during the grand opening of Trump International Hotel in Washington, on Oct. 26, 2016. Donald Trump, in the middle of his campaign for president, and his children hosted an official ribbon cutting ceremony and press conference to celebrate the grand opening of his new hotel.

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    Clashes between protesters and authorities over the Dakota Access Pipeline escalated Sunday night after an estimated 400 people tried to breach a law enforcement barrier, NBC News reported.

    The sheriff's office described the clash as a "riot" prompted by "very aggressive" activists, while protesters said authorities used tear gas, rubber bullets and a water cannon in below-freezing temperatures.

    In a statement, the sheriff's office said tear gas and other "less than lethal means" were being used after protesters "engaged in organized tactical movement and attempted to flank and attack" a law enforcement line near a bridge. A protest organizer said they had removed a truck that had been on the bridge since Oct. 27 to gain access to North Dakota Highway 1806.

    The clash comes days after organizers held coordinated demonstrations across the country to protest a 1,170-mile oil pipeline that has generated the largest American Indian protest movement in modern history. Thousands of people have flocked to North Dakota, where the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe argues that the proposed pipeline could permanently contaminate its water source, the Missouri River.



    Photo Credit: AP
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    In this image provided by Morton County Sheriff’s Department, law enforcement and protesters clash near the site of the Dakota Access pipeline on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, in Cannon Ball, N.D. The clash came as protesters sought to push past a bridge on a state highway that had been blockaded since late October, according to the Morton County Sheriff's Office.In this image provided by Morton County Sheriff’s Department, law enforcement and protesters clash near the site of the Dakota Access pipeline on Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016, in Cannon Ball, N.D. The clash came as protesters sought to push past a bridge on a state highway that had been blockaded since late October, according to the Morton County Sheriff's Office.

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    A permanent U.S. citizen who drove for a car service in New York City has been accused of traveling to the Middle East to join ISIS and talked about wanting to carry out an attack in Times Square.

    Mohamed Rafik Naji, 37, faces charges of providing material support for terrorism, according to court documents and law enforcement officials. The Yemen-born Brooklyn resident was arrested in his home borough. 

    "As alleged, the defendant was persistent in his efforts to join ISIL and support its terrorist objectives,” said U.S. Attorney Robert Capers. “We will continue to identify and prosecute individuals like Naji who seek to empower our nation’s enemies and endanger our citizens and partners around the world.”

    Authorities said that the man allegedly traveled to Yemen in 2015 in an attempt to join ISIS, but returned after several months when he was unable to join the terrorist organization.

    The documents said he made it as far as Turkey, but never was able to cross the border to Syria. He allegedly asked relatives for money on more than one occasion and had said he tried to cross the border 5 times but there was too much security. He also allegedly sent an associate files with sounds of gunfire and claimed to have lamost been killed by the "army."

    He later expressed support for ISIS after an attack in the French city of Nice killed 86 people and injured more than 400 others.

    The documents allege that he "expressed support for staging an attack in Times Square" during a conversation with an undercover FBI operative on July 19, four days after the attack in Nice. There was no indication that he ever did anything to carry out such an attack.

    Authorities also said that he expressed support for ISIS in posts on a Facebook account, making the page's profile picture an image of men with guns walking toward the visage of the terror group's flag. The cover photo of the page also featured images of ISIS symbols.

    Officials in court said that Naji drove cars for Uber, but the company denied that he worked for the service.

    His attorney, Susan Kellman, said that Naji had "a legitimate purpose" for being in Yemen. 

    "I have no idea what my client said and what the confidential source said," she said."He had a legitimate purpose for being in Yemen. He has family there."

    He's being held without bail. 

    Naji is the latest area resident to be arrested on charges related to supporting terror groups. At least a half-dozen other have been accused of supporting ISIS or attempting to join the group since mid-2015. 


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    A powerful earthquake off the northeast Japanese shore Tuesday sent residents fleeing to higher ground and prompted worries about the Fukushima nuclear power plant destroyed by a tsunami five year ago. 

    Lines of cars were seen snaking away from the coast in the pre-dawn hours after authorities issued a tsunami warning and urged residents to seek higher ground immediately. The warning was lifted nearly four hours later.

    The magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck in the same region that was devastated by a tsunami in 2011, killing some 18,000 people.

    There were reports of minor injuries and damage, Japanese broadcaster NHK said. The earthquake shook buildings in Tokyo, 240 kilometers (150 miles) southwest of the epicenter.

    NHK also showed one person's video of water rushing up a river or canal, but well within the height of the embankment. It was eerily reminiscent of the 2011 disaster, when much larger tsunamis rushed up rivers and overflowed, wiping away entire neighborhoods.

    On Tuesday, tsunami waves were recorded along the coast. The highest one was 1.4 meters (4.6 feet) in Sendai Bay. A tsunami advisory for waves of up to 1 meter (3 feet) remained in effect along the coast.

    The operator of the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant said there were no abnormalities observed at the plant, though a swelling of the tide of up to 1 meter was detected offshore.

    The plant was swamped by the 2011 tsunami, sending three reactors into meltdown and leaking radiation into the surrounding area. The plant is being decommissioned but the situation remains serious as the utility figures out how to remove still-radioactive fuel rods and debris and what to do with the melted reactor cores.

    Plant operator TEPCO said a pump that supplies cooling water to a spent fuel pool at the nearby Fukushima Dai-ni plant stopped working, but that a backup pump had been launched to restore cooling water to the pool. Both plants are run by Tokyo-based TEPCO.

    Naohiro Masuda, head of TEPCO's decommissioning unit, said he believes that the pump was shut off automatically by a safety system as the water in the pool shook.

    He said decommissioning work at the destroyed Dai-ichi plant had been temporarily suspended because of the earthquake.

    The U.S. Geological Survey measured the magnitude at 6.9.


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  • 11/21/16--09:13: First-Time Bride at 80

  • Two elderly residents of a North Miami Beach nursing home are proof that you’re never too old to find love.

    Maria Cobar, 80, and Carlos Suarez, 95, tied the knot November 10 at a ceremony inside the Aventura Plaza Rehab and Nursing Center. It was Cobar's first marriage, according to the nursing center.

    The two met when Suarez moved in across the hall from Cobar, who has lived there since 2009, less than a year ago. They met in the hallway, and were quickly attracted to each other. She gave him a tour, then at the arts and crafts activities he came and sat next to her. The two became known as the love birds of the complex.

    Suarez’s first reaction to seeing his future bride was, "not bad," which quickly turned to "I'm not letting her get away," according to NBC's "Today" show.

    Cobar came to the United States from Guatemala as a 26-year-old, becoming a nanny and housekeeper, the nursing center said. Suarez, whose wife died in 2006, arrived from Cuba 56 years ago with her and their son before starting a jewelry business, "Today" reported.

    The pair love to dance — though he's usually in a wheelchair next to Cobar, who has a walker. They also like to watch the news and the sunset together, the nursing home says.

    The nursing home provided the venue as well as items like balloons, the arch and musical entertainment, while Cobar's daughter got the flowers and decorations, according to "Today." Employees chipped in to surprise them with a mariachi band for them to dance to. It managed to get Suarez out of his wheelchair and dancing with his bride.

    “My mom never worried about looking for a husband, I was her priority her entire life,” Cobar's daughter, Ana Cobar, told the Miami Herald. “The day finally has come and I’m so happy for her, she deserves this.”

    The two now live in the same room and will take their first trip out of the home as a couple this Thanksgiving, spending the day at the home of Cobar’s daughter, "Today" reported.



    Photo Credit: Albert Barg

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    The turkey grandma is serving at Thanksgiving probably looks — and tastes — far different from what she remembers from her childhood.

    But heritage breed turkeys like the Narragansett, which industrial livestock brought to the brink of extinction, are making a comeback, NBC News reports.

    They're smaller, leaner, free range, more expensive and can be more challenging to cook, but Anna Dinn of Hamtramck, Michigan, is one of many who has found that the taste and tradition of heritage turkeys made cooking one worth it.

    There are over 15,000 heritage turkeys gobbling across the United States, according to the Livestock Conservancy, a 1000 percent boost since 1997, when they were nearly extinct. Of course, commercial farms produce about 280 million each year in North America.



    Photo Credit: Jeannette Beranger / The Livestock Conservancy

    Narragansett turkeys, a heritage breed turkey making a comeback from near-extinction.Narragansett turkeys, a heritage breed turkey making a comeback from near-extinction.

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    The main U.S. visa program for technology workers could face renewed scrutiny under President-elect Donald Trump and his proposed Attorney General, Sen. Jeff Sessions, a long-time critic of the skilled-worker program.

    H-1B visas admit 65,000 workers and another 20,000 graduate student workers each year, Reuters reported. The tech industry, which has lobbied to expand the program, may now have to fight to protect it, immigration attorneys and lobbyists said.

    Trump sent mixed signals on the campaign trail, sometimes criticizing the visas but other times calling them an important way to retain foreign talent.

    Sessions, however, has long sought to curtail the program and introduced legislation last year aiming to make the visas less available to large outsourcing companies such as Infosys.   



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    President-elect Donald Trump at Trump International Golf Club, Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.President-elect Donald Trump at Trump International Golf Club, Nov. 20, 2016 in Bedminster Township, New Jersey.

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    The State Department on Monday warned Americans traveling to Europe of an increased risk of terrorist attacks, particularly over the holiday season, NBC News reported.

    "Credible information indicates the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL the U.S. gov't acronym for ISIS or Da'esh), al-Qaeda, and their affiliates continue to plan terrorist attacks in Europe, with a focus on the upcoming holiday season and associated events," the travel advisory read.

    The State Department urged travelers to avoid large crowds and exercise caution at tourist sites, festivals, large holiday events and outdoor markets.  

    Terrorists have carried out attacks in Belgium, France, Germany and Turkey this year but the advisory warns of the potential for attacks throughout the continent.



    Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images

    File - A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officer checks a passenger's identification and boarding pass at a security checkpoint at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015.File - A Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officer checks a passenger's identification and boarding pass at a security checkpoint at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015.

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