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US and World News

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    Donald Trump and Mike Pence's election has sparked protests across the country, and while thousands of people took to the streets, some expressed their displeasure a bit differently.  

    Activists have been opening their wallets to make a donation to Planned Parenthood - with a twist. Countless people, largely women, posted on social media that they donated in honor of Indiana Governor and now Vice President-elect Mike Pence, using the address for his office so he will receive a certificate of thanks.

    Celebrities also got in on the trend, with actress Amber Tamblyn and comedian Amy Schumer posting their support on Instagram.

    Pence has been a long-time opponent of Planned Parenthood and abortion rights. While serving in Congress before being elected governor in 2012, Pence authored multiple anti-abortion pieces of legislation, including the first bill to strip Planned Parenthood of all federal funding. 

    This most recent outpouring of donations isn't the first time Pence has been the target of a social media initiative. After he signed a controversial abortion ban into law in Indiana in March, women began contacting the governor's office to send updates on their menstrual cycles in protest of the measure.

    The law, which was ultimately blocked by a federal judge, sought to prohibit women from seeking an abortion if they discovered any fetal genetic abnormalities, in addition to a ban on any abortions performed because of a fetus’ race, sex or ancestry. Doctors who performed any of the abortions forbidden under the measure would have been subject to discipline or potentially sued for wrongful death. Abortion providers would have also been responsible for burying or cremating "fetal remains," and donating fetal tissue would have become a felony. 

    While Planned Parenthood hasn't commented in detail on the post-election trend of donating in Pence's honor, the organization did thank advocates, saying they've "been blown away by the support" and acknowledging that many people are donating in both Pence and Clinton's names.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Mike Pence speaks at a rally on October 25, 2016 in Marietta, Ohio.Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Mike Pence speaks at a rally on October 25, 2016 in Marietta, Ohio.

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    A powerful earthquake struck New Zealand's South Island early Monday, killing at least two people, damaging buildings and infrastructure, and prompting emergency services to warn people along the coast to move to higher ground to avoid tsunami waves.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    HANMER SPRINGS, NEW ZEALAND - NOVEMBER 14: Large cracks are seen on Highway 7 following a 7.5 magnitude earthquake on November 14, 2016 near Hanmer Springs, New Zealand. The 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck 20km south-east of Hanmer Springs at 12.02am and triggered tsunami warnings for many coastal areas. (Photo by Matias Delacroix/Getty Images)HANMER SPRINGS, NEW ZEALAND - NOVEMBER 14: Large cracks are seen on Highway 7 following a 7.5 magnitude earthquake on November 14, 2016 near Hanmer Springs, New Zealand. The 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck 20km south-east of Hanmer Springs at 12.02am and triggered tsunami warnings for many coastal areas. (Photo by Matias Delacroix/Getty Images)

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    A United Airlines captain warned passengers to keep politics off his plane or face removal after a politically-charged "scuffle" broke out aboard a flight from San Francisco to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, late this week.

    A passenger recorded cellphone video of the captain’s brief sermon on United flight 1212 and it was posted on Jon Bauer's YouTube account Friday.

    "On my friends@wirelessness flight from SFO to Mexico, some kinda scuffle broke out where an individual with a ‘plaid shirt and a camo cap’ said something racist (about being ‘glad to have kept his guns’) to an African American lady, and she began to cry and freak out,” Bauer explained in the caption.

    Bauer said crew members “separated the two of them" before the captain of the flight got on the intercom system to deliver a heartfelt plea to his passengers, discouraging further political discussion.

    The captain reminded passengers that they were clashing over politics while “in a metal tube at 35,000 feet.”

    “I understand that everybody has their opinions. That’s fine. If you support him, great. If you don’t, I understand,” he said about president-elect Donald Trump’s victory.

    The captain asked passengers to bear in mind that the trip to Mexico was so people could “have a good time.”

    “And what I do ask is that as people we have the common decency to respect each other’s decisions and to get along,” the captain urged.

    He continued, "Nobody is going to change their minds by arguing. And let's keep our opinions to ourselves, on this particular matter, at this particular time. When cooler heads prevail and we can talk and realize we're all human beings and we call can stick together and we can all pull for this country in our own way, then that's what we should do."

    If passengers want to “rant” and “rave,” however, the captain insinuated that they would be removed from his plane. "There's another flight tomorrow. You're not going to be on this one," he warned.

    His broadcast was met with cheers and applause, and someone can be heard saying, “Hear! Hear!”

    United Airlines spokeswoman Megan McCarthy confirmed that an incident occured on the flight, but didn't comment on the specific nature of the disagreement.

    "Our pilot worked to diffuse an argument between customers and worked to get the flight safely to its destination," McCarthy said in a statement to NBC. 



    Photo Credit: Jon Bauer via YouTube

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    Tom Brady no longer wants to reveal who he voted for in the presidential election. 

    In a radio interview with Kirk and Callahan on WEEI-FM on Monday morning, the New England Patriots signal caller said he doesn’t want to discuss politics anymore and added that there has been too much negativity in the past week.

    "I am not talking politics anymore, I have other things to worry about. Just speaking with my family, it's a bad idea," he said. "I know I told you I would, and then after I told you I would I changed my mind."

    President-elect Donald Trump said the day before the election that both Brady and Patriots head coach Bill Belichick were voting for him. Appearing in Manchester, New Hampshire, Trump opened the rally by telling the crowd he got a phone call from Brady and a letter from Belichick. 

    Brady did vote - we know that much, as the Brookline Town Clerk's Office shared a photo of the quarterback turning in his absentee ballot.

    He never confirmed who he voted for, but had said last week that he would be ready to reveal his decision after the election.

    Brady did say that he remains "hopeful and optimistic" that the country will move forward. But he said his focus remains football.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File

    Tom Brady of the New England Patriots looks on in the second quarter of the game against the Cleveland Browns at FirstEnergy Stadium on October 9, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)Tom Brady of the New England Patriots looks on in the second quarter of the game against the Cleveland Browns at FirstEnergy Stadium on October 9, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

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    The moon is fascinating on a normal night, but it’s even more awesome when it comes in the form of a supermoon.

    That's what meteorologists call a new or full moon that occurs when the celestial body is within 90 percent of its closest approach to Earth in its orbit.

    When the moon is closer to Earth than average, it appears much larger than it normally does — an awesome sight to see. A supermoon can appear as much as 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than the average full moon, according to NASA.

    The last supermoon was on October 16, but night owls will get another chance to enjoy a supermoon on Monday, November 14. The moment marks the closest the full moon will get to Earth since January 26, 1948, according to NASA.

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center posted a video to Twitter Wednesday showing the "super" supermoon, which it said will be the biggest in a generation.

    [[400591291, C]]

    Not only will this be the largest supermoon of 2016, it will be another 18 years before the full moon likely gets this close to Earth again, on Nov. 25, 2034, according to NASA.

    The final supermoon of 2016 comes on December 14.

    [[401034755, C]]



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    The supermoon that is also a blood moon rises over a sailboat in Boston Harbor on September 27, 2015. That supermoon coincided with a total lunar eclipse, a rare combination. A little over a year later, a new supermoon will be the closest the moon comes to earth since 1948. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)The supermoon that is also a blood moon rises over a sailboat in Boston Harbor on September 27, 2015. That supermoon coincided with a total lunar eclipse, a rare combination. A little over a year later, a new supermoon will be the closest the moon comes to earth since 1948. (Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images)

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  • 11/14/16--13:21: Diving as Therapy for Vets

  • Veterans who return home after serving can have a long and difficult road to recovery, but one nonprofit is helping veterans find emotional and physical therapy just off the coast of Southern California. 

    Dive Warriors is a nonprofit organization founded by Brad Mirman. The organization teaches veterans how to scuba dive and takes them out to the ocean once a month.

    "If you’re a disabled veteran in the Southern California area, we will teach you how to dive, we will get you certified, and you come on the boat and Dive Warriors pays for it all," Mirman said.

    Mirman is not a veteran, but he gave up his career as a screenwriter to grow Dive Warriors after what he saw in veterans who came to the organization.

    "A lot of them when they come … there's a darkness in their eyes, there's a broken spirit to them," Mirman said. "As they immerse in this group … bonds form, and that light comes back in their eyes."

    Jared Lemon is one of the veterans who says that diving makes him feel free. The 35-year-old from Temecula lost his arm while deployed in the army, but once he is underwater, he can no longer feel the phantom pain.

    "It helps release them demons, all them negative thoughts and the things that stay with you after war," Lemon said.

    Being part of Dive Warriors has even brought some veterans back from the brink.

    Kelly McCumisky is confined to a wheelchair and suffers from PTSD. The first time she took a dive, she had planned never to come back up.

    "My whole experience was to commit suicide and that nobody would figure out that that's what I had done," McCumisky said.

    Now, like Lemon, McCumisky feels free when she is underwater.

    "That’s the time I'm free, out of this chair and feel like everybody else," she said.

    These veterans also find comfort in each other and being around people who can understand them.

    "I needed a group that could understand me and I could understand and feel safe in," McCumisky said. "These guys do that for me."

    Kyle Schneider, a Navy veteran, said that being part of Dive Warriors "brings us into becoming an overall family."

    For more information about Dive Warriors, visit their website.



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Jared Lemon, a 35-year-old army veteran from Temecula, on a dive with Dive Warriors. Lemon said that being underwater is freeing.Jared Lemon, a 35-year-old army veteran from Temecula, on a dive with Dive Warriors. Lemon said that being underwater is freeing.

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    Dallas-based restaurant chain Chili's Grill & Bar has apologized and vowed to correct a wrongdoing after a local restaurant manager took away a free meal offered to veterans on Veterans Day.

    U.S. Army veteran Ernest Walker, 47, of Cedar Hill, Texas, said he was served the meal as part of a promotion offering U.S. military veterans free meals on Veterans Day.

    Walker finished his food and was preparing to leave the restaurant when the trouble began.

    Walker, accompanied by his service dog Barack, said he believes an elderly man wearing an American flag shirt and Trump sticker told the restaurant manager that Walker was wearing his camp indoors and was not a U.S. veteran and should not receive the free meal.

    In an encounter captured on video by Walker and posted to Facebook, the manager asked for Walker's military ID, which he provided. Walker also provided his discharge paperwork.

    Walker said the manager then took his to-go meal.

    "I looked around and I'm embarrassed at this point," Walker said. "People are looking. I'm a soldier. I'm a person and everybody's looking like I stole food."

    The manager also indicated the service dog was not a service dog, despite having a red service vest and certified service tags.

    On Sunday, Chili's issued the following statement on Walker's Facebook page and to NBCDFW. It reads:

    "We are aware of the situation that occurred at our Chili's Cedar Hill restaurant on November 11th. Our goal is to make every guest feel special and unfortunately we fell short on a day where we serve more than 180,000 free meals as a small token to honor our Veterans and active military for their service, hence these actions do not reflect the beliefs of our brand.  We are taking this very seriously and the leaders in our company are actively involved with the goal of making it right. Since the incident occurred, we have extended an apology and we are reaching out to the guest."

    "They're doing what they should do, but they still haven't validated me as a soldier," said Walker. "I just need him to say, 'I see your ID, I see your DD214, and I respect you as a soldier, and as a man and as a customer.'"

    Walker said he served in the Army's 25th Infantry Division, serving from 1987 to 1991. He said he was in an Army uniform without his name or rank on it on Veterans Day because he did not want to be mistaken for an active-duty soldier.

    "I wear this one day a year," said Walker. "I'm not some kook that's reliving the past."

    Monday, Chili's issued an additional statement saying they had spoken with the veteran and had removed the manager from the restaurant. Walker's attorney Kim Cole said the manager has been suspended pending an investigation by the company.

    "Today, we personally apologized to Mr. Walker for the unfortunate experience in our restaurant on Veterans Day and thanked him for his service to our country. We also thanked him for taking the time to speak with us and he appreciated our apology. Our goal is to make every Guest that walks into our restaurants feel special and we fully own that one of our restaurants fell short on an important day where we strive to honor our veterans and active military for their service. We took swift action and immediately removed our manager from the restaurant. We are now in the process of working with Mr. Walker on a resolution that promotes trust and healing."

    Monday afternoon, the mayor of Cedar Hill, Rob Franke, said the situation was not reflective of his community and that people should be concerned for the veteran as well as the restaurant's manager.

    Franke's entire statement can be read below:

    This is not what we are about. I find it sad and much too prevalent in our society today that we apply the actions of individuals to entire cities and entire groups, and in so doing make the exception the rule. This situation is indeed the exception in Cedar Hill. It is interesting to me that just yesterday afternoon, on the patio at City Hall, we had a ceremony honoring and praying for veterans and their service dogs. We hosted veterans and their service dogs from several cities around Cedar Hill as we honored their service, dedication, training, and hearts of giving. These positives expression of community and unity don’t get the recognition they deserve. I also find it sad that we, as a people, too easily resort to demonstrations to express our frustration and the wrongs of this world rather than taking the harder and more sustainable route of working things out. My concern for the veteran is paramount, but we must also consider the manager and how he can become a better person and perhaps do better the next time he is put in a difficult situation. People do best and learn the most from experience. To learn requires patience and grace, neither of which can occur in the heat of emotion, demonstration, and anger. Please know, this situation is not reflective of our community, nor the way we prefer to handle wrongs. Peace and blessings, Rob Franke.



    Photo Credit: David Bridewell, NBC 5 News

    U.S. Army veteran Ernest Walker (center) with his attorney (left) and service dog U.S. Army veteran Ernest Walker (center) with his attorney (left) and service dog "Barack."

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  • 11/13/16--21:45: 3 Arrests for Racist Texts

  • Three Oklahoma residents have been linked to racist messages that were sent to African-American students at the University of Pennsylvania Friday, authorities said.

    Black students at Penn received racist texts Friday from an account on an app called GroupMe, with the messages and images causing fear among the student body.

    The university said its police and cybersecurity departments were investigating and had determined the origin of the GroupMe account to be based in Oklahoma.

    "The account contains violent, racist and thoroughly repugnant images and messages," university spokesman Ron Ozio said in an email. "The University is taking every step possible to address both the source of the racist material and the impact it has had on Black students on campus."

    More than 100 students were placed into a group "N----- Lynching" and sent a series of racial epithets and photos of African-Americans hanging from trees by nooses from users like "Daddy Trump." An event invitation called "Daily Lynching" also went out to the students added to the group message.

    "I just felt uncomfortable," said freshman Nate Morris, one of the students who received the messages. "What was said was 'We're going to find and hunt down all African-Americans at this college."

    Early Saturday morning, University of Oklahoma president David Boren posted a message on Twitter stating a student at his school was involved in the texts and was suspended as a result. He also said, however, the messages originated somewhere other than the University of Oklahoma.

    Sunday afternoon, the University of Pennsylvania announced the criminal investigation had concluded and that three Oklahoma residents, including the University of Oklahoma student, were linked to the messages. They also said no students at Penn were involved in the messages.

    Students posted on social media about the fear and sadness that they felt upon reading the texts.

    The Penn College Republicans called the incident "absolutely despicable" while university President Amy Gutmann called the messages "simply deplorable."

    There has been a rash of hate speech and rhetoric across the country in the wake of the presidential election, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate crimes. President-elect Donald Trump spoke out against such incidents in a "60 Minutes" interview that aired Sunday.

    A group gathered on the University of Pennsylvania campus Friday afternoon to support each other. Students then filed into Huntsman Hall for a town hall discussion. Media were not allowed to attend the event.

    Following the town hall, dozens of students marched through campus in protest of the hate speech and white extremism. They were one of several groups that protested across Philadelphia Friday night connected with the presidential election.

    The students marched over to Franklin Field where the Quakers hosted Harvard in a football matchup. They were allowed to enter the field and protest around halftime along the sidelines.

    In their statement to students Sunday, Penn officials said that staff members are working with the students who received the messages and providing them the support they need.

    Mayor Jim Kenney said in a statement that he "condemns in the strongest possible terms the racist activity taking place at the University of Pennsylvania."

    "It is heartbreaking to see this type of activity here in the birthplace of our democracy and the city of brotherly love," Kenney said. "I urge the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations to investigate and hold all responsible parties accountable for this disgusting behavior."

    A petition from UPenn alumni was created on change.org calling for Trump, who graduated from the Wharton School at Penn in 1968, to speak on the incident. It had nearly 5,000 supporters; Trump's interview was not aired until Sunday night.

    The racist messages came one day after students in Bucks County's Council Rock High School North reported swastikas and threats linked to Trump to school officials.

    And on Wednesday, pro-Trump graffiti was spraypainted in Queen Village while Nazi graffiti was found in another South Philadelphia neighborhood.

    An African-American student at Villanova University reported she was attacked by a group of men who yelled, "Trump," as they ran towards her Thursday.

    Chad Dion Lassiter, a leading race relations expert with the group Black Men at Penn, said the disturbing incident at the West Philadelphia Ivy League school appears to be "a microcosm of what we've been seeing in the larger democracy."

    "It is no surprise this is occurring on the heels of the victory by President-elect Trump, who didn’t create this environment, but certainly stoked the flames," Lassiter said.

    He said black students and white students should come together to support each other in the aftermath of this "very disappointing" episode.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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    Earthquakes are rippling through Oklahoma more quickly than ever, and strong too: forty-six since the beginning of the month, as powerful as magnitude 5.0, NBC News reported.

    Scientists say that wastewater from fracking is very likely triggering the tremors at unprecedented rates, but the rise in the oil-tapping process has been a boon for the state's economy — roughly one quarter of jobs are tied to the energy industry.

    Now stakeholders in the industry are in the midst of a reckoning over how to keep the ground from shaking, while many policymakers are careful to not implicate the energy industry directly.

    "The oil and gas industry basically owns the state," said Oklahoma state Rep. Cory Williams (D-Stillwater). "Policymakers don't want to do anything that appears to harm the jobs created by the oil and gas sector."



    Photo Credit: NBC 5 News

    Cushing City Manager Steve Spears said 40 to 50 buildings were damaged in Sunday's earthquake, which was the third in Oklahoma this year with a magnitude of 5.0 or greater.Cushing City Manager Steve Spears said 40 to 50 buildings were damaged in Sunday's earthquake, which was the third in Oklahoma this year with a magnitude of 5.0 or greater.

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    President Barack Obama held his first news conference for the first time since Donald Trump was elected president on Nov. 14, 2016, discussing his meeting with Trump in the White House and that the Democrats should stick to their core beliefs in the upcoming years of Republican leadership.

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    President-elect Donald Trump said during the campaign that he would scrap or renegotiate the Iranian nuclear deal, but leaders there said they expected the U.S. to stick to its agreement, NBC News reported.

    "The results of the U.S. election have no effect on the policies of the Islamic Republic of Iran," Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said one day after the election, according to the state news agency IRNA. Rouhani added that improved economic ties are "irreversible."

    Iranian leaders emphasized that the nuclear deal was not a bilateral agreement, but was also reached with China, Russia, France, Germany and the U.K.

    "Every U.S. president has to understand the realities of today's world," said Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, one of the architects of the deal. "The most important thing is that the future U.S. president sticks to agreements."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    A file photo of Iran's President Hassan Rouhani at the United Nations.A file photo of Iran's President Hassan Rouhani at the United Nations.

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    One of the two Colombian men accused of using a historic ship nicknamed "the floating embassy of Spain" to sail cocaine from South America to New York City has been extradited to Manhattan to face charges, prosecutors said.

    Jorge Luis Hoayeck is expected to be arraigned Monday on drug smuggling charges after being brought to the city on Thursday, according to the Office of the Special Narcotics Prosecutor for New York City. His alleged accomplice, Jorge Alberto Siado-Alvarez, is also expected to be extradited from Colombia to the Empire State in the near future.

    Authorities said the two men allegedly ran a drug cartel and paid two crew members aboard the Juan Sebasian de Elcano -- a 371-foot steel-hulled, four-masted schooner built by Spain in 1927 for training purposes -- to ferry drugs to New York City in April and May 2014.

    Authorities say the two crew members were paid about $32,000 to hide the drugs on the boat during a voyage to Manhattan. When the boat docked on Manhattan's west side on May 14, 2014, the two crew members allegedly traveled to the Bronx to deliver the cocaine to dealers for the cartel.

    Authorities say that two days later DEA agents and NYPD officers along with and state police moved and made seven arrests as the drugs were being moved through Stamford, Connecticut. More drugs and weapons were found at the Bronx safehouse.

    Prosecutors allege that Hoayeck and Siado-Alvarez came up with the plan to use the Spanish ship to smuggle 8 kilos of cocaine. Investigators said both men are heard on a wiretap discussing the plan.

    When the ship returned to Spain, authorities there conducted a search and found 127 kilograms of cocaine hidden in a storeroom.

    In 2014 – after visiting France, Italy and Morocco, it crossed the Atlantic to visit Colombia, the Dominican Republic and New York.

    If convicted, the men could face up to life in prison. Information on their attorneys wasn't immediately available.



    Photo Credit: Handout

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    Jeremy Wernick, 13, raised more than 3,000 hats for cancer patients with his "Hatsgiving" charity drive in Albany, New York. This year, he is hoping to raise even more.

    Jeremy Wernick, 13, raised over 3,000 hats for cancer patients with his Jeremy Wernick, 13, raised over 3,000 hats for cancer patients with his "Hatsgiving" charity drive in Albany, New York.

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    A Los Angeles substitute teacher is accused of telling sixth-graders their parents would be deported in the wake of Tuesday's presidential election.

    An audio recording of the exchange captured at Bret Harte Middle School in South Los Angeles by a student's cell phone is under review by the Los Angeles Unified School District. The conversation occurred a day after billionaire businessman Donald Trump defeated former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the race for president.

    A mother of one of the students told NBC4 Southern California that she expected some backlash after Trump made a hard-line stance on deportation part of his campaign from the time he announced his candidacy last year.

    "I would think the kids would do it, but I never thought a teacher would do it," said Jennifer Reynaga.

    The Reynaga family shared the audio with NBC4 and sister station Telemundo 52. On the recording, an individual can be heard telling Reynaga's 11-year-old daughter, "If you were born here, then your parents got to go. Then they will leave you behind, and you will be in foster care."

    Reynaga said her daughter asked the physical education substitute teacher how the president-elect knows where her family lives.

    "I have your phone numbers, your address, your mama's address, your daddy's address. It's all in the system, sweetie," the person says in the recording.

    LAUSD officials said they declined to comment on pending personnel matters. Reynaga and her husband said they met with school officials and were told the substitute teacher has been fired.

    Immigration was a key component of Trump's campaign, and his win Tuesday led Los Angeles immigration rights advocates to offer reassurances Thursday to the city's undocumented immigrant community.

    "You have scared children," said Steve Zimmer, board president of the Los Angeles Unified School District. "One of most important things you can do is make sure that children who have qualified for DACA know that they are safe and their status is secure."

    DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, went into effect in 2012. It allows certain people who came to the United States as children to request permits to stay in the United States that are renewable every two years, provided they meet guidelines.

    Trump has vowed to deport people convicted of serious crimes who are in the United States illegally. In a September speech, then candidate Trump promised a more hard-line approach to a crowd of Arizona supporters.

    "There will be no amnesty," Trump said. "Our message to the world will be this: You cannot obtain legal status or become a citizen of the United States by illegally entering our country."

    Los Angeles County has an undocumented immigrant population estimated as high as 800,000, about 12 percent of the county's 10 million residents, according to the Public Policy Institute of California.

    The agency estimates that nearly 40 percent of adult undocumented immigrants live with children who were born in the United States. An estimated 13 percent of K-12 students in California have a parent who is an undocumented immigrant, according to PPIC.



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    A Los Angeles substitute teacher is accused of telling sixth-graders their parents would be deported in the wake of Tuesday's presidential election.A Los Angeles substitute teacher is accused of telling sixth-graders their parents would be deported in the wake of Tuesday's presidential election.

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    President Barack Obama holds his first news conference for the first time since Donald Trump became President-elect at the end of the 2016 presidential election on Nov. 14, 2016. He discussed his meeting with Trump and tells Democrats to stick to their core beliefs in the upcoming years.

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    Education was another casualty of war for 1,000 children, most of whom are only now starting classes after two years without school, at an Iraqi camp for displaced people, NBC News reported.

    Their school is a tent, supplies donated hand-outs and their teachers are classmates' parents who have never taught a day in their lives. But after years under ISIS rule where boys' education was ideological indoctrination and basic martial training and girls couldn't learn at all, there's enthusiasm and hope for the future.

    "I want to help people and being a doctor is nice," said one girl, named Malak, at the Debaga camp, near Mosul in northern Iraq.

    Now it's up to relief agencies to make up for lost time for instruction and help abate the trauma the children suffered amid war.



    Photo Credit: NBC News
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    President Obama made aggressive use of the CIA and Special Operations Forces to hunt and kill al Qaeda, ISIS and other terror groups.

    But he also imposed a set of rules designed to regulate the conduct of U.S operatives — banning torture, for example, and minimizing the risk of civilian casualties in drone strikes.

    President-elect Trump, who campaigned against those rules, would be able to undo most of those rules in his first hour in office, NBC News reported.

    If he chooses to do so, Trump can quickly reshape large swaths of American national security policy, much of which is governed by executive orders and presidential policy guidance that can be overridden by the president's signature. That includes U.S. sanctions on Russia, and its recent rapprochement with Cuba.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Donald Trump.Donald Trump.

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    More and more teens say they've had serious depression, researchers reported Monday. But more are not being treated for it. 

    The troubling trend suggests doctors are afraid to ask about and treat depression, which is a major cause of suicide, the researchers said.

    And they say it's important to find out why rates are up, NBC News reported. 

    "The 12-month prevalence of major depressive episodes increased from 8.7 percent in 2005 to 11.3 percent in 2014 in adolescents and from 8.8 percent to 9.6 percent in young adults," Dr. Ramin Mojtabai of Johns Hopkins University and colleagues wrote in their report published in the journal Pediatrics. 



    Photo Credit: File/AFP/Getty Images

    Illustration/Getty ImagesIllustration/Getty Images

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    Backlash to Bannon pick

    Steve BannonSteve Bannon

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    Early Monday's supermoon, the biggest full moon since 1948, won't be back until 2034. See photos of the phenomenon from around the world.

    Photo Credit: Joseph Kaczmarek/AP

    The supermoon sets behind the Philadelphia skyline on Nov. 14, 2016.The supermoon sets behind the Philadelphia skyline on Nov. 14, 2016.

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