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US and World News

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    U.S. equities closed mostly higher on Friday, with the three major indexes posting their best weekly gains of the year on the back of a surprise Republican sweep, CNBC reported.

    "I think you're seeing a transition from a government that had its thumb on growth to a free economy," said Bruce Bittles, chief investment strategist at Baird. "We're now looking at an economy that can reach its full potential."

    The Dow Jones industrial average closed about 37 points higher, with Goldman Sachs contributing the most gains. For the week, the Dow rose around 5.4 percent, marking its best weekly performance since December 2011.

    "The Republican sweep across Washington should pave the way for tax reform at both the individual and corporate level. America's largest multinational companies will almost assuredly have the opportunity to repatriate some of its foreign cash holdings for a modest penalty," said Jeremy Klein, chief market strategist at FBN Securities.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Specialist Thomas McArdle, left, and trader Kevin Lodewick work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. U.S. and global stock markets were recovering in late morning trading Wednesday after a sharp sell-off a day earlier.Specialist Thomas McArdle, left, and trader Kevin Lodewick work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015. U.S. and global stock markets were recovering in late morning trading Wednesday after a sharp sell-off a day earlier.

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    Some Facebook users logged onto the social network Friday afternoon to learn that they were no longer among the ranks of the living.

    A spokesman for the social network said that for a short period Friday, a message meant for memorialized profiles was posted to accounts of living people. 

    "We hope people who love (user's name) will find comfort in the things others share to remember and celebrate (his or her) life," the message said. 

    Among the affected users was affected was Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. 

    It's not clear what is causing the message to display, but several users were quick to make light of the macabre mistake on social media. 

    [[400871821, C]]

    Facebook said that it fixed the error quickly, and pages were displaying normally again Friday evening.

    "We are very sorry that this happened and we worked as quickly as possible to fix it," the spokesman said. 


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    During her concession speech to new president elect, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton and her team's decision to wear purple drew much attention.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09:  Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton, pauses as she concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 09: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton, pauses as she concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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    President Barack Obama lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C., to mark Veterans Day.

    Photo Credit: NBC

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    More women are asking Planned Parenthood workers about access to birth control and other health care since Donald Trump was elected president, according to the organization's chief medical officer. 

    Some women have taken to social media to discuss their concerns about the prospect of affordable access to women’s health care diminishing, with one long-lasting form of birth control called an IUD apparently attracting extra attention. 

    Trump has promised to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act as one of his first acts in office, which could mean the end of free, FDA-approved contraception, including birth control pills, diaphragms, IUDs and emergency contraception like Plan B. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal on Friday, Trump said he would consider keeping at least two parts of President Barack Obama's signature health care law: a ban on insurers denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions and a provision that allows young adults to stay on their parents' plans. 

    “Since the election, we have seen an uptick in questions about access to health care, birth control, and the Affordable Care Act,” said Dr. Raegan McDonald-Mosley, the chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood. “While we truly hope that birth control methods will be available, accessible and affordable to all women under the Trump administration, we understand people’s real concerns about losing access to birth control, which is basic health care for women.”

    There is a real possibility that health care cuts could come in the months after Trump is inaugurated in January, according to Cindy Pearson, the 19-year executive director of National Women's Health Network.

    "It's not an irrational fear," Pearson said. "It's a fear that stems from people who will soon be in charge of Congress and the White House. We're very concerned since Mr. Trump and Mr. Pence have supported policies that would leave women in difficult situations."

    NBC has reached out Trump's campaign for comment. 

    Trump has expressed different positions on women's health issues. He voiced disapproval for abortions during the campaign, even telling MSNBC’s Chris Matthews in March that women who get abortions should be “punished,” though he later backtracked on that statement. As for birth control, Trump said on "The Dr. Oz Show" in September that women shouldn't need a prescription to have access to it. 

    There is one safe and effective form of birth control that can last for four years, when another president may be elected, and some women appear to be discussing it. 

    The IUD, short for intrauterine device, is a T-shaped object inserted in a woman's uterus, where it can stay for years. It is 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancies — more than condoms, though IUDs do not prevent sexually transmitted diseases. Hormonal IUDs can last for about 3 to 6 years on average, while non-hormonal IUDs can last for up to 12 years, according to Planned Parenthood.

    IUDs have offered a unique appeal for their longevity. Google searches for the term were four times their average on Wednesday night, after Trump was projected to win the presidency.

    And women on Twitter have suggested that others get IUDs to last through a Trump presidency.

    Kristyn Brandi, MD, OB/GYN and family planning specialist at Boston Medical Center and fellow with Physicians for Reproductive Health called the Affordable Care Act a "game-changer" for helping women afford contraception.

    “We don't really know what will happen with the new administration," she said. "I have heard of several women that are concerned about either access to IUDs or replacing existing ones. We have already seen patients who are seeking contraception based on concerns about what will happen to reproductive health and the Affordable Care Act."

    The talk of IUDs may have been prompted by an article in The Daily Beast last week. 

    "What Donald Trump has promised to do—and what Mike Pence has actually done during his tenure as governor of Indiana—is to make birth control a lot more difficult for women to access,” Erin Gloria Ryan wrote, advocating that women consider getting an IUD in case Trump were elected.

    IUDs are the third most popular form of contraception, according to Planned Parenthood, behind condoms and birth control pills, and they were already becoming more popular. The organization has seen a 91 percent increase in IUD users in the last five years alone.

    McDonald-Mosley said Planned Parenthood expects that trend to continue in coming years. 

    Democrats have long supported Planned Parenthood, but Republicans have fought in recent years to restrict funding to the organization. Since Trump was elected president, the organization has made it clear that they are there to stay. 

    "We now face a very different future, and there is uncertainty ahead," their website read after the race was called. "But one thing is for sure: We will never back down, and Planned Parenthood will never stop providing the care patients need."

    Pearson and the NWHN are preparing to "fight like crazy" to stop potential health care cuts, she said.

    --Suzanne Ciechalski contributed to this story



    Photo Credit: UIG via Getty Images
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    File photo of two intrauterine devices, or IUDs.File photo of two intrauterine devices, or IUDs.

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    A North Carolina chapter of the Ku Klux Klan announced it will hold a rally in December to celebrate Donald Trump's presidential victory, in what a national hate-tracking group called the latest evidence that white supremacist groups are feeling emboldened since the election. 

    Calls are now growing for Trump to speak out against a string of hateful incidents across the country since his election. 

    The Loyal White Knights of Pelham, North Carolina, one of the largest Ku Klux Klan groups in the U.S., said on its website it will hold the event on Dec. 3. The time and location of the event were not listed. The group is based in Pelham, a small, unincorporated community in Caswell County near the Virginia border. It organized a rally in South Carolina last year protesting the removal of the Confederate flag from the state Capitol building. 

    A phone call to the number on the group's website was not immediately returned. Caswell County Sheriff's Office said Friday it did not have information about the event. 

    The official newspaper of the the KKK, The Crusader, endorsed Trump for president days before the presidential election and Trump's campaign was quick to reject the support.

    "Mr. Trump and the campaign denounces hate in any form. This publication is repulsive and their views do not represent the tens of millions of Americans who are uniting behind our campaign," the campaign said then in a statement. 

    Trump was previously criticized for being slow to condemn former Klan leader David Duke after he gave the candidate his backing. The Republican has also repeatedly retweeted messages from white supremacist sympathizers. 

    Duke celebrated Trump's win over Democrat Hillary Clinton, tweeting early Wednesday, "This is one of the most exciting nights of my life. Make no mistake about it, our people have played a HUGE role in electing Trump!"

    Ryan Lenz, spokesperson for the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups and crimes, said Trump's election "has ripped opened wounds of racial resentment in this country, wounds we thought were healed or we were working to heal for some time."

    The SPLC has received reports of 200 racially-tinged incidents and hate crimes from across the U.S. since the election and it's working to review them and understand what is going on, Lenz said.

    He added that the KKK and other white supremacist groups feel legitimized by Trump's victory: "The fact is they are once again going to march on the street and celebrate Trump’s victory is proof positive that Donald Trump's campaign has legitimized extremist ideologies in this country so much that they are no longer relegated to the fringes of American society."

    Trump has not commented on the hate crime incidents and his presidential transition team has not responded to NBC's requests for comment on Thursday and Friday.

    The president-elect did tweet about protesters who have held demonstrations across the U.S. against his presidency. In one tweet he said the protesters were "incited by the media." In a follow up tweet Friday morning, he struck a more conciliatory tone, saying "Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud!"

    While most of the anti-Trump rallies were peaceful, police in Portland, Oregon, said a rally there overnight Thursday turned into a "riot" when some protesters carrying bats smashed car and store windows and lit fires. Early Wednesday, protesters in Oakland, California, smashed windows at the Oakland Tribune newsroom, and set tires, trash and newspaper stands on fire there and in Berkeley. 

    Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, said incidents of vandalism from anti-Trump protesters also are a "troubling" trend. 

    Greenblatt added he's not surprised by KKK's move and their attempt to gain publicity by exploiting the presidential election. He said other white supremacist groups are also celebrating Trump's victory.

    James Edwards, a white supremacist who runs “The Political Cesspool, a radio show based in Tennessee, wrote about Trump’s opponents, “I hope President Trump shows them no mercy. Don’t be magnanimous, Mr. President. Crush the defeated, especially those in the media, and Make America Great Again!”

    Lenz said The Daily Stormer, the most influential Neo-Nazi website, put out a call Thursday to harass Hispanic and Muslim immigrants and to make them feel a genuine sense of fear. 

    SPLC published a petition Friday morning asking the president-elect to reject hate and bigotry. More than 17,000 people have signed it. 

    Human Rights Watch has also called for Trump to speak out against hate-filled violence. The New York Times issued a similar appeal in an editorial. 

    President Barack Obama, Clinton and other prominent Democrats have said they wished the billionaire businessman the best as he transitions to the presidency. 

    But departing Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid lashed out at Trump, saying in a statement that he has "heard more stories in the past 48 hours of Americans living in fear of their own government and their fellow Americans than I can remember hearing in five decades in politics."

    "Watching white nationalists celebrate while innocent Americans cry tears of fear does not feel like America," he said.

    He said that if Trump "wants to roll back the tide of hate he unleashed, he has a tremendous amount of work to do and he must begin immediately."



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016.President-elect Donald Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016.

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    As the Trump presidency gains momentum, the president-elect's team continues to fill out its list of potential cabinet picks with new names, NBC News reported.

    Vice President-elect Mike Pence will spearhead the transition, taking over for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who will be one of several vice-chairs, the Trump campaign announced Friday.

    Pence, as well as Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner and campaign chief Steve Bannon will be leading the charge to whittle down names for cabinet positions. Along with them, the executive committee will include three of his children, Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and Ivanka Trump, PayPal founder Peter Thiel, and RNC Chairman Reince Priebus.

    But despite Donald Trump's campaign pledge to "drain the swamp" in Washington and his outsider campaign, many of the prospects are clear Washington insiders.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Republican vice presidential candidate Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a campaign rally, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, in Newton, Iowa.Republican vice presidential candidate Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during a campaign rally, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016, in Newton, Iowa.

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    President-elect Donald Trump is open to keeping parts of President Obama's signature health care law, he said in an interview with the Wall Street Journal published Friday.

    Trump told the paper, after speaking with Obama at the White House the day before, he was considering keeping the clause that allows children to stay on their parents' insurance policies.

    The president-elect also told the Journal that he favors the prohibition on insurers denying coverage to patient with a pre-existing condition.

    "I like those very much," Mr. Trump told the paper.

    Trump has argued in the past that the pre-existing condition aspect of the law should not be repealed.

    During the Republican primary debate that aired on CNN on Feb. 25, Trump said of the prohibition, "I think we need it. I think it's a modern age. And I think we have to have it."

    Despite his acceptance of these two aspects of the law, Trump reiterated to the Journal that he will repeal and replace Obamacare when he takes office.

    Trump told the paper he would move "quickly" in repealing the law.    



    Photo Credit: EFE

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    Americans may not have agreed on much in this election, but they were united around one issue: marijuana legalization.

    Eight states legalized marijuana in some form on Election Day. California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada showed up to support recreational marijuana, while Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota passed ballot initiatives legalizing medical marijuana. Only in Arizona did voters reject cannabis in 2016.

    Marijuana is now legal for medical or adult use in 28 states, accounting for more than 60 percent of the U.S. population, according to the National Cannabis Industry Association (NCIA), an advocacy group that lobbies for federal marijuana reform.

    "Tuesday night’s results send a simple message – the tipping point has come," said NCIA executive director Aaron Smith.

    But jubilation over marijuana's victory was tempered by the election of Republican Donald Trump and GOP majorities in both the Senate and House.

    “The prospect of Donald Trump as our next president concerns me deeply,” Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, said in a statement. “His most likely appointees to senior law enforcement positions — Rudy Giuliani and Chris Christie — are no friends of marijuana reform, nor is his vice president.”

    Marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Under President Barack Obama, federal authorities largely took a hands-off approach to state-level legalization efforts. But an incoming administration more skeptical of drug reform could easily reverse that approach.

    Still, analysts and advocates alike say, the industry may be too big and valuable for a Trump administration to stop, especially after voters in California — home to the world's 6th largest economy — legalized the recreational use of marijuana.

    "It's obviously a different ball game than what we anticipated under a [Hillary] Clinton administration," says Taylor West, NCIA deputy director. "But regardless of who the president is and who is controlling the Senate, this is still an issue that Congress is going to have to wrestle with."

    The industry continues to face some unique challenges. Shut out of banks, businesses can't get loans and shops are stockpiling cash, creating a significant security threat.

    CASH CROP
    In August, the Drug Enforcement Administration reaffirmed marijuana's classification as a Schedule 1 drug, the same category as heroin, with no recognized medical use or value — and without access to financial institutions. Subsequently, financial institutions have been prohibited from doing business with dispensaries, growers, distributors and other marijuana-related businesses that are operating legally under state laws, forcing them to run cash-only businesses.

    The amount of money changing hands is substantial. By the end of 2016 the legal pot market is expected to reach $2.6 billion in sales, according to The ArcView Group, a cannabis-focused investment firm that gathers market research. 

    U.S. Rep. Ed Perlmutter, of Colorado, who has pushed for reforming federal banking laws, calls it “an issue of public safety.”

    “As a result of being denied access to the banking system, there are millions of dollars in cash moving around the streets of Colorado,” Perlmutter said. “These businesses are forced to operate as cash-only enterprises, inviting crime such as robbery and tax evasion and adding to the burden of setting up a legitimate small business.” 

    The owner of one Denver-based marijuana business, who asked not to be named for fear of being targeted, said because she is forced to operate in all cash, she has to factor the threat of robbery into every business decision.

    "We only operate in daylight hours, we rotate pay schedules, and we have a buddy system where we walk employees to their cars to make sure they get there safely," she said, adding that her vendors, utility bills and landlord are all paid in cash. "I never travel alone."

    In 2013, the Obama administration said it wouldn’t prosecute financial service companies that choose to serve state-sanctioned marijuana businesses, as long as they can assure that their clients are in compliance with the guidelines set forth by the Justice and Treasury departments. The administration stopped short of offering blanket protection against enforcement.

    National banks have remained wary of being implicated for money laundering and have avoided the industry for fear that if an account turns out to be a front for the illegal drug trade — no matter how diligent the vetting process is — it could put the institution at risk of losing its FDIC insurance, or its employees may face imprisonment.

    Still, those guidelines have been enough to encourage a small number of community banks and credit unions to start offering basic services in states with thorough "seed-to-sale" enforcement programs, which track pot from cultivation to purchase.

    Carmella Houston, vice president of business services at Salal Credit Union in Washington state, said they monitor accounts closely to makes sure clients are complying with the DOJ's Cole Memo priorities, which require states to prevent legally grown marijuana from crossing its borders, sales to minors and the use of legal sales as a cover for illegal activity.

    "With seed-to-sale traceability, we can ensure federal compliance," Houston said. 

    Salal began serving state-licensed businesses in Washington in 2014. It is one of a handful of credit unions openly serving the industry, though, according to Houston, several others are doing it "not openly." Applicants go through a thorough review process to obtain an account with Salal. 

    "We not only review the business, but also the owners, develop an understanding of the types of products being sold, and where the initial start up funds came from to launch their companies," Houston said.  

    The enormous regulatory and compliance burdens don't come cheap. Salal charges clients fees based on the number and amount of transactions.

    Between March 2014 and March 2016, the number of banks and credit unions across the country willing to handle pot money under Treasury Department guidelines jumped from 51 to 301, The Associated Press reported, citing federal data.

    Merchants, however, say there are not nearly enough banks willing to take their cash. In the meantime, "potrepreneurs" are developing creative, non-cash payment options.

    'POTREPRENEURS'
    PayQwick has been dubbed the PayPal for pot.

    Much like the online payment system, PayQwick allows customers to use its platform to pay for cannabis and marijuana-related services via loadable cards, a smartphone app and, soon, debit and credit cards.

    Dispensary owners can use the online payment platform to pay vendors, landlords and employees. Customers can use the preloaded PayQwick card to make purchases and collect rewards. 

    The Calabasas-based company operates in Washington and Oregon, where state regulations enable PayQwick to comply with the Cole Memo guidelines, according to CEO Kenneth Berke. Berke hopes to expand to other states once a strict tracking system is in place. 

    “The key to our platform is seed-to-sale traceability. Colorado is still a little bit of the wild, wild west because it doesn’t have the traceability system,” Berke said. “We assure every dollar deposited into a PayQwick account comes from the legal sale of marijuana. Every dollar going through the PayQwick system can be tracked back to legitimate marijuana sales."

    Applicants undergo a rigorous screening process and the company conducts its own compliance checks four times a year, Berke said. Clients who aren’t following the rules or refuse inspections are dropped from the system. 

    GUARDIANS OF GREEN
    Even with some relief from cash stockpiles, security concerns still plague canna-businesses. Many continue to operate unbanked and their product is lucrative in the black market and across state lines, leaving them vulnerable to robberies.

    The concern for safeguarding cannabis businesses has led to a boom in the security industry in states like Colorado and Oregon.

    Derek Porter, a former special operations Marine who worked on an anti-terrorism security team before he founded Security Grade Protective Services in 2012, says there is a need for well-trained security teams that are used to handling important cargo.  And many former veterans are finding employment on patrol at dispensaries and marijuana growers.

    "Veterans are a much better fit because they have a great work ethic and are still in a heavy security mindset," said Porter who noted about 70 percent of his employees are vets. "For a lot of these guys, they're doing work they see as familiar to the patrols assigned to them in Iraq and Afghanistan."

    In July 2016, Travis Mason, a former Marine, was shot and killed during a botched robbery at an Aurora, Colorado, dispensary where he worked as a security guard. Mason's killing alarmed the industry and security firms like Porter's saw an increase in requests for armed guards.

    Transport is another complication. The cannabis has to move from the cultivators to the stores, and cash needs to move between businesses and to state authorities for tax payments.

    "Cash is a pain, time consuming and costly for everyone," Porter said. "We need to pay guards to go pick up the cash. It’s a risk for them to have a large amount of cash on hand. We count the money twice on our end, and then we have to take it to the bank and they have to count it."

    TAXING FOR THE TAXMAN
    Security isn't just a concern for those directly involved in the cannabis industry. The government is also reckoning with the risks and impracticality of bundles of cash.

    In states where marijuana is legal for recreational and medicinal uses, businesses are subject to state sales taxes. 

    Oregon, for instance, has collected $6.84 million from the pot tax’s first two months of 2016 — exceeding expectations for the entire year — and more than half of the state’s pot dealers paid that in cash, the AP reported. Of the $15 million-plus Washington collected from marijuana sales in February, nearly $4 million was cash carried through the lobby of the liquor board’s headquarters in Olympia.

    In California, 100 percent of the taxes collected on $662,956,249 of taxable medical cannabis sales, roughly $59 million, was paid in cash, according to the state Board of Equalization (BOE). And without any access to banks or credit unions, marijuana businesses in the state have also incurred a 10 percent penalty when taxes over $10,000 were paid in cash. The penalty will be waived starting Jan. 1, 2017.

    "Security is a concern," NCIA's West said. "Aside from the financial problems, the safety is one of the biggest. Employees are at risk since people know where and when there will be large amounts of cash."

    To curb the risk of robberies, the California BOE says it changes its marijuana tax day collection, also known as "cash day," monthly, avoiding routine habits that could place taxpayers and employees at risk. 

    Meanwhile, tax collection offices are doing what they can to manage the heaps of pungent cash pouring into their buildings. Offices in Oregon and Colorado have bolstered security, hiring more guards and investing in safety glass and security cameras.

    HAZY FUTURE
    The marijuana industry remains eager for a federal solution to their banking problem.

    Now, they’re awaiting signals of how a Trump Justice Department will approach cannabis. Hope Hicks, a spokeswoman for the Trump campaign, didn’t respond to a request seeking comment.

    "I’ve been urging my colleagues in both the House and Senate to quickly address this issue in the next Congress," Congressman Perlmutter said. "We must allow legitimate marijuana businesses access to banking services and in order to keep our communities safe.”

    California's "Yes" vote could tip the scale federal reform given the size of the state's economy and the economic impact of the marijuana industry there. Arcview estimates that legal annual California pot revenues could exceed $7 billion by 2020.

    "This is the beginning of the end of the war on marijuana in the United States," said said California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who helped craft the state's ballot measure.

    A recent Gallup poll found that a record 60 percent of Americans support making cannabis legal. West said that bills to amend marijuana laws have gotten bipartisan support, but they haven't moved out of committee because committee chairs don't want to talk about it.

    "They aren't feeling the pressure to take on the issue," West argues. "But when you have 101 members of the House and 18 senators representing millions of constituents in legal adult-use states, Congress won't be able to keep looking the other way and pretending it isn't happening." 



    Photo Credit: File--AP
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    In this file photo a man rolls a marijuana joint.In this file photo a man rolls a marijuana joint.

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    Hillary Clinton told donors on a conference call Saturday that she blames FBI Director James Comey for stopping her campaign's momentum in the final stretch, a source on the call told NBC News. 

    “There are lots of reasons why an election like this is not successful," Clinton said on the call, according to the source. "But our analysis is that Comey’s letter raising doubts that were groundless, baseless, proven to be, stopped our momentum,” she said.

    Just weeks before the election, Comey sent a letter to congress that said the FBI found additional emails pertinent to the investigation into Clinton's use of a private server while secretary of state. 

    The emails were later determined to not warrant further action by the FBI. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets supporters and members of her staff during a news conference at the New Yorker Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City.Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton greets supporters and members of her staff during a news conference at the New Yorker Hotel on November 9, 2016 in New York City.

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    Hillary Clinton made her first public appearance in New York City Friday night since conceding the presidential election. 

    Clinton headed to a staff party at her campaign headquarters in Brooklyn, where she was expected to speak, sources tell NBC News. NBC 4 New York cameras captured a brief glimpse of Clinton striding from a car toward the building in an orange blazer.

    Jenna Lowenstein, the digital director for Clinton's campaign, tweeted that the former candidate brought 1,000 red roses that someone had sent her to distribute at the staff party.

    Clinton has not been seen publicly since announcing her concession Wednesday, although a Westchester woman Thursday said she ran into the Clintons while on a hike in Chappaqua.

    The woman, Margot Gerster, posted a photo of her and Hillary Clinton, both appearing relaxed and smiling, on Facebook. 

    "I got to hug her and talk to her and tell her that one of my most proudest moments as a mother was taking Phoebe with me to vote for her," Gerster wrote on Facebook. 

    She said Clinton hugged her back and "exchanged some sweet pleasantries and then I let them continue their walk. Now, I'm not one for signs but I think ill [sic] definitely take this one. So proud."

    The Clinton campaign headquarters is located on Pierrepont Street in Brooklyn Heights, inside a building that also houses offices for Morgan Stanley and the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.  

    Elsewhere in New York City, security remained tight around Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan, where president-elect Donald Trump lives and his own campaign was headquartered. Protesters continued to demonstrate outside there for a third straight day, peaceful for the most part. 



    Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY
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    Clinton walks into her campaign headquarters in Brooklyn Friday for a staff party.Clinton walks into her campaign headquarters in Brooklyn Friday for a staff party.

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    A suicide bombing claimed by ISIS rocked a Muslim shrine in a remote part of southwestern Pakistan just before sunset Saturday, killing more than 45 people, officials told NBC News.

    The attack, which also injured dozens, happened while hundreds of people were gathered for worship at Dargah Shah Noorani, a shrine in Balochistan province.

    Many of the killed and injured were women and children, ambulance dispatch operator Ghulam Ali told NBC News, adding that medics were struggling to reach victims.

    "The area is isolated and dark, and it is not even reachable by car but only by foot, so we are expecting higher casualties," he said.



    Photo Credit: EFE

    En abril de 2013, Abu Bakr anunció la fusión de las milicias en Irak y Siria y las bautizó como Estado Islámico de Irak y el Levante (ISIS), originadas en 2002 bajo el mandato de Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, abatido por las tropas estadounidenses el 7 de junio de 2006.En abril de 2013, Abu Bakr anunció la fusión de las milicias en Irak y Siria y las bautizó como Estado Islámico de Irak y el Levante (ISIS), originadas en 2002 bajo el mandato de Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, abatido por las tropas estadounidenses el 7 de junio de 2006.

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    A man was shot during the latest protest against President-elect Donald Trump in Portland, Oregon, early Saturday, NBC News reported.

    A gunman was being hunted following the incident on the Morrison Bridge.

    "Preliminary information indicates that a suspect was in a vehicle on the bridge and there was a confrontation with someone in the protest," Portland Police said in a statement. "The suspect got out of the vehicle and fired multiple shots injuring the victim."

    Authorities said his wounds are not thought to be life-threatening.

    The suspect was descried as an African American male aged in his late teens. He is believed to have fled in a gray or silver sedan.

    Earlier, police reported that "burning projectiles" were being thrown at officers during one of three demonstrations that occurred simultaneously in the city.


    Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.

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    Four Americans are dead after a man detonated a "suicide vest" early Saturday morning at Bagram Airfield, the largest U.S. military base in Afghanistan, a senior U.S. military official confirmed to NBC News.

    Two U.S. service members and two American contractors were killed in the attack, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said in a statement. 

    Aside from the victims who were killed, an estimated 14 others were injured in the attack, which occurred around 5:30 a.m. local time, as people were gathering for a post-Veterans Day event.

    "I want to express my sincere condolences to the families of the fallen, and I want to reassure the loved ones of those injured that they are getting the best possible care," Carter said. 

    There was no immediate word on the identities of the victims.



    Photo Credit: Ahmad Jamshid, AP

    Helicopters take off from Bagram military base 31 miles north of Kabul, Afghanistan, June 19, 2013.Helicopters take off from Bagram military base 31 miles north of Kabul, Afghanistan, June 19, 2013.

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    Protesters flooded Manhattan's Union Square Saturday in a fourth straight day of rallies against the election of Donald Trump.

    Thousands of protesters marched at Union Square Saturday afternoon to vocalize their objection to the president-elect and his policies. Police estimate the number of protesters to be over 5,000 people.

    Two people were arrested during the peaceful Manhattan protests. Officers allowed participants to continue the demonstration, but warned them not to stand on or climb the barricades parked in front of Trump Towers otherwise they'd be arrested.

    Homemade picket signs bobbed throughout the sea of protesters, several of which read "love trumps hate" in black block letters. 

    "We reject the president-elect!" the crowd chanted as protesters started marching up Fifth Avenue. Some climbed the poles of scaffolding and stood on them, holding protest signs while pumping their firsts in the air.

    Filmmaker Michael Moore unsuccessfully tried to meet with Donald Trump at Trump Tower in midtown while protests were still underway on Saturday. 

    Traffic delays and intermittent street closures were present throughout Manhattan on Saturday afternoon, including the Union Square area and East 57th Street and Fifth Avenue. 

    Meanwhile, protests continued Saturday in Chicago, where demonstrations have also formed in the days since the election.

    The Chicago protest began at 10 a.m. at Millennium Park. The crowd of about one thousand people then marched down Michigan Avenue, chanting things like "the people united will never be divided," and "we reject the president-elect."

    In Los Angeles, 200 people were arrested after police began to break up a protest that began Friday night and lingered into the early hours of Saturday morning. Three juveniles were also arrested for vandalizing a police cruiser and throwing a bottle at police officers.

    Violence struck a demonstration in Portland, Oregon when one person was shot by a man who had gotten into a confrontation with a protester. The shooting follows a rowdy Friday night protest, when Portland police used tear gas in response to "burning projectiles" thrown at officers, police said on Twitter.

    The demonstrations have rippled globally, as protesters in Berlin gathered around Brandenburg Gate to rally against Donald Trump.



    Photo Credit: AP
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    Demonstrators march up 5th Ave during a protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016, in New York.Demonstrators march up 5th Ave during a protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016, in New York.

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    In an interview to air on ’60 Minutes’ Sunday, President-elect Donald Trump said that he will be “very restrained” with his social media use while he is president. 

    Trump is known for his controversial Twitter presence, unleashing late-night rants and insults toward rivals like Sen. Ted Cruz, a former contender for the GOP presidential candidacy, and former Miss Universe Alicia Machado.

    In the interview, Trump credits his social media following for some of his success. 

    “The fact that I have such power in terms of numbers with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, et cetera, I think it helped me win all of these races where they’re spending much more money than I spent,” he said.



    Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov., 9, 2016, in New York City.Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov., 9, 2016, in New York City.

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    President-elect Donald Trump said in an interview that will air Sunday that he will be "restrained" with the use of social media as president, NBC News reported.

    "I'm going to be very restrained, if I use it at all, I'm going to be very restrained," Trump said in an interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" that will air Sunday night.

    But by Sunday morning, Trump had already contradicted himself. He lashed out at the New York Times on Twitter, complaining about "very poor" coverage and claiming without evidence the paper is "losing thousands of subscribers."

    Trump then followed up with a tweet referring to himself in the third person and slamming the Times as "dishonest" for saying that he believes "more countries should acquire nuclear weapons." In his tweet, Trump falsely claimed he never said that.

    But in interviews with the Times, CNN and Fox News, Trump did say that more countries, including Japan and South Korea, should have nuclear weapons.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump says US President Barack Obama was born in the United States during a campaign event at the Trump International Hotel, September 16, 2016 in Washington, DC.US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump says US President Barack Obama was born in the United States during a campaign event at the Trump International Hotel, September 16, 2016 in Washington, DC.

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    After thousands of people took to the streets across the country on Saturday to display dissent for Donald Trump's election, many more demonstrations were planned and expected to occur on Sunday — the fifth straight day of protests, NBC News reported. 

    Organizers have created Facebook events to help coordinate anti-Trump protesters in a number of large cities, including New York City, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Oakland and San Francisco as well as smaller cities such as Springfield, Massachusetts; Erie, Pennsylvania; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and New Haven, Connecticut.

    Thousands of accounts on Facebook have indicated interest in joining these protests.

    According to the NYPD, an estimated 25,000 turned out in New York City on Saturday. They chanted phrases such as: "We reject the president-elect." Protests were also held in Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Las Vegas, Miami, Birmingham, Alabama and Fresno, California among others.

    Police in Portland, Oregon used tear gas and "diversionary bang devices" to make 19 arrests on Saturday during an "unpermitted" march, police said. This comes a day after a protester was shot in a confrontation with an individual on a bridge. Two suspects were arrested in connection with the shooting.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Thousands of protesters march in reaction to the upset election of Republican Donald Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the race for President of the United States on November 12, 2016 in Los AngelesThousands of protesters march in reaction to the upset election of Republican Donald Trump over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the race for President of the United States on November 12, 2016 in Los Angeles

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    A Stanislaus County sheriff's deputy was shot and killed at point-blank range while in the line of duty Sunday, police said.

    Sheriff Adam Christianson said that a Dep. Dennis Wallace, a 20-year veteran of the force, was shot twice in the head around 8:30 a.m. while investigating a suspicious person and vehicle near a fishing access in Hughson, a city roughly 10 miles outside of Modesto.

    "He was executed," Christianson said. "We believe that Dep. Wallace was killed outside of the car and we know for a fact that the gun used in this crime was in direct contact with his head when the trigger was pulled twice."

    The suspect, who has been identified as 37-year-old David Machado, fled the scene and carjacked an escape vehicle in the nearby city of Ceres, Christianson said. Machado was later apprehended in Tulare County and brought into custody by police Sunday afternoon.

    Before being captured, police said Machado perpetrated an armed robbery at a convenient store in the city of Lindsay. He tried to swipe a woman's purse, but she was able to resist and alert police.

    Machado fled the scene on foot, but law enforcement officials were able to track him down and detain him just after 12:30 p.m. without any problems.

    Despite the capture, Christianson was visibly upset to report another officer's death.

    "It's time to stand united," he said. "It's time to stand together with public safety and with law enforcement to stop what's happening in our nation."

    Wallace, 53, dedicated some of his time with the police force to working with early intervention, prevention and education programs. He leaves behind a wife and family, Christianson said.

    "(Wallace) had a very special relationship with young people and a special place in our hearts at the sheriff's office," Christianson said.

    Stay tuned for details.



    Photo Credit: Stanislaus County Sheriff's Department
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    Police respond to a Police respond to a "critical incident" outside Modesto (Nov. 12, 2016).

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    The calls began within hours of when Donald Trump declared victory.

    Immigrants with pending cases called D.C. immigration lawyer Jim Tom Haynes starting Wednesday morning to ask if they would be forced out of the United States. Within 24 hours of Trump winning the presidency, Haynes had reassured more than 20 people that he would help them.

    "We're operating in crisis mode," he said. "The mood is very, very pessimistic and dark."

    The immigration assistance and advocacy organization CASA de Maryland also is fielding a surge in phone calls from people worried about their futures. Lawyers can't answer every question immigrants have about the impact of Trump's win, legal program manager Nicholas Katz said.

    "People are looking for answers and we don't know what this is going to look like," he said.

    In Trump's first days as president-elect, immigration lawyers are scrambling to help fearful clients but uncertain of how policy changes may affect the lives of millions of people.

    Attorneys across the country are figuring out how to navigate a "scary, uncertain environment," American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) executive director Benjamin Johnson said. He is advising the D.C. organization's more than 14,000 members to prepare their clients for the worst.

    "Sometimes the most important thing you can do is to prepare them for what might happen, even if you don't know exactly what it is," he said. "You have to provide them with a picture of the possibilities."

    AILA held an urgent conference call Wednesday afternoon, 12 hours after Trump declared victory. So many people tried to participate in the call that AILA hit the 500-participant limit of the dial-in conference service they used; lawyers were turned away.

    Johnson said immigrants and their attorneys have reason to be afraid of President-elect Trump.

    "[Fear is] justified because some very, very scary things were said during the campaign and 'Did he really mean that?' is a very legitimate question," he said.

    The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to an inquiry.

    On the campaign trail, Trump said he would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which gives temporary work permits to "Dreamer" immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

    He called for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what the hell is going on."

    After facing swift backlash from Democrats and Republicans alike, the proposal was repackaged to describe a suspension of immigration "from terror-prone regions where vetting cannot safely occur."

    Trump accused Mexico of sending rapists and criminals to the U.S., and famously vowed to build a wall between the countries and force Mexico to pay for it.

    When Trump takes office Jan. 20, immigration attorneys are uncertain if they should expect dramatic or incremental change.

    Haynes' firm, Haynes Novick Immigration, urged their clients in a mass email sent Wednesday evening that they should "try to complete their cases as soon as possible."

    Haynes said Trump's win has forced him to reevaluate dozens of pending cases. Instead of postponing a Dec. 5 court date for a Central American immigrant seeking asylum, Haynes said he will pursue an administrative closure that will allow the applicant to stay in the country with a work permit.

    "We have to go forward, even though we don't necessarily want to," he said.

    Before Trump takes office, CASA, the immigrant assistance nonprofit, is holding additional trainings to teach immigrants their rights. The group will hold a community meeting from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday at Mayfield Intermediate School in Manassas, Virginia, to counsel families about what they can do ahead of Jan. 20.

    "We're working on trying to advise people about their rights and ... the risks in a very uncertain environment," Katz said.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    A naturalization ceremony for new citizens held in Miami, Nov. 10, 2016 -- a day after Trump became President-elect.A naturalization ceremony for new citizens held in Miami, Nov. 10, 2016 -- a day after Trump became President-elect.

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