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US and World News

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    A Donald Trump presidency will soon be reality for America. Supporters have hailed it as the chance for much needed government reform, and protesters in cities across the U.S. have already taken to the streets about their worries and fears.

    What was once a joke response among some Hillary Clinton supporters to a disappointing election, moving to Canada or somewhere else, is being taken more seriously. The election results have sparked a debate among liberals on whether to leave the country or remain and fight for progressive causes. 

    In the early hours of Wednesday, searches for "move to Canada" peaked, relative to the last seven days, according to Google Trends. "Easiest countries to immigrate to" was a related search.

    As the election returns were being counted, 200,000 people visited Canada's immigration website, with half being from U.S. IP addresses, a representative for the Canadian department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship told NBC in an email. And those figures don't account for users trying to access the site after it crashed. 

    "The volume for this time period is significantly higher than the same time the previous week, when the website saw just over 17,000 users," the representative said.

    Searching for immigration information doesn't take very long, but actually moving to Canada would take a lot longer. The wait time to achieve permanent residency in the country could be months or years, according to immigration attorney David Clarke. He said Trump may not even be president by the time current U.S. citizens finally become Canadian citizens.

    Celebrities took to Twitter on election night to sound off on the idea of an exodus.

     

    "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston spoke on the topic in an October episode of "The Bestseller Experiment" podcast. "Absolutely, I would definitely move," he said.

    However, others are arguing against fleeing, saying it is not what will keep America together.

    "The social solution is to stay and put up a fight," wrote the writer and activist Norman Solomon, executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, a non-profit organization that helps spread "progressive perspectives" on social issues.

    Solomon added that America needs a "united front ... to understand clearly and organize effectively against the Trump regime. Failure to put up a fight should be unthinkable."

    Michael Krikorian, the author of the novel “Southside,” wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times titled "Don’t move to Canada. Stay and fight."

    Filmmaker Michael Moore also urged people to stay and face the election results. In a Facebook post Wednesday that has since been shared more than 180,000 times, the prominent liberal wrote a "Morning After To-Do List" for the American people. First on the list: "Take over the Democratic Party and return it to the people."

    "Any Democratic member of Congress who didn't wake up this morning ready to fight, resist and obstruct," Moore added, "must step out of the way and let those of us who know the score lead the way in stopping the meanness and the madness that's about to begin."

    On Thursday, Moore posted a second to-do list, since shared more than 20,000 times. It included forming an opposition movement, as well as impeaching Trump. Moore and other protesters on the left are calling for action that is difficult and time-consuming, but it's clear that they are not backing down. The list concluded, "More to-do tomorrow."

    Trump has pledged to serve as president for all Americans in a speech that President Barack Obama said left him feeling "heartened."



    Photo Credit: AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    A person is shown standing near the U.S.-Canadian border in Derby Line, Vt., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2009.A person is shown standing near the U.S.-Canadian border in Derby Line, Vt., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2009.

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    Hate crimes and other racially tinged incidents are being reported across the country in the aftermath of the presidential election ranging from vandalism to threats to beatings.

    Some of the incidents were reported by police, though many more appeared on social media as anecdotes and not all have been verified.

    Most of the recent cases appear to involve graffiti or violence directed at racial or ethnic minorities and in some reports the perpetrators indicated support for Donald Trump.

    Meanwhile, detectives in Chicago are investigating one video that appears to show a man being beaten for voting for Trump. 

    Trump's candidacy was marked in part by promises to deport Latinos and monitor and ban Muslims, and one of Hillary Clinton's arguments for voting against Trump was to denounce race-baiting rhetoric by voting for tolerance. Trump pledged in his acceptance speech early Wednesday "to every citizen of our land that I will be president for all Americans." And President Barack Obama, with whom Trump met Thursday, said he was "heartened" by Trump's speech.

    Still, the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate crimes, is "seeing a rash of hate crimes, of hate rhetoric, racist graffiti in campuses around the country," said Mark Potok, an SPLC senior fellow, who called the uptick extraordinary.

    "We have seen [Ku Klux] Klan literature drops, we have seen that suicide hotlines are ringing off the hook, and we are hearing of very extensive bullying in and around schools," he added.

    NBC has reached out to the Trump campaign and presidential transition team for comment.

    Among the reports of events occurring in the aftermath of the election:

    • A San Diego State University student walking to her vehicle had her purse, backpack and car keys taken by two men making comments about the president-elect and the Muslim community, university police said. She walked away to report the vehicle, but found her vehicle missing when she returned. Police are investigating the attack as a hate crime.
    • A short video posted Wednesday and viewed at least 250,000 times on Facebook showed students at a school carrying a Trump sign while someone can be heard saying "white power." Two students at York County School of Technology in Pennsylvania walked with a sign into the lobby and chanted "white power" twice before the director "squelched it," said communication outreach coordinator Renie Mezzanotte, who added that "the administration has been absorbed by" the incident for two days, the outcry has become disruptive to instruction, and that instruction and student and staff safety are always the school's priorities. An officer at the York Area Regional Police Department confirmed that they investigated the incident. 
    • Police were investigating the appearance of a swastika, the word "Trump" with a swastika replacing the T and the words "Seig Heil 2016," on a store front in South Philadelphia hours after the election was called. The Anti-Defamation League said it was disgusted to learn of the graffiti
    • A representative of NYU's Tandon School of Engineering confirmed that someone had wrote the word "Trump!" in graffiti on a door at the school's Muslim prayer room. It has since been removed and Dean K. R. Sreenivasan said in an email to students that any violation of civility and mutual respect in the community "is an offense against us all."
    • In Chicago, video posted to Twitter and shared thousands of times appears to show a man being beaten by a group of people who say he voted for Trump. The victim appears to be white, the assailants black. The attack happened just before 1 p.m. Wednesday on Chicago's West Side, police said. Chicago detectives have the video but a representative did not elaborate about political affiliations of those involved.
    • And the Times-Dispatch of Richmond, Virginia, reported that the words, "Your vote was a hate crime" were spray-painted on several monuments to figures from the U.S. Confederacy

    An 18-year-old woman of middle eastern descent in Louisiana said she made up a story that she was beaten by two white men who were yelling racial obscenities, according to the Acadania Advocate. She had told city police, according to a statement, that she was repeatedly struck in the back near the University of Louisiana Lafayette by the males, who she said also took her hijab and wallet and fled. Lafayette police confirmed the woman retracted her story to NBC.

    There were 5,479 hate crime incidents reported in 2014, according to that year's FBI hate crime statistics report, the most recent one available. The 2015 report is due out Monday.

    The Southern Poverty Law Center's president released a statement Wednesday saying that the group has already begun holding Trump to his promise to serve as president for all Americans.

    "Today, we're facing a new reality – a president-elect who has denigrated people because of their race, their religion, their ethnicity, their gender, and more," SPLC President Richard Cohen wrote.

    Potok, the SPLC senior fellow, said the last time he saw such a similar rash of attacks was after Obama was elected, but "they tended to be more hidden."

    "This time around we are seeing people more emboldened," he said.

    Potok said that there hasn't been an uptick on black-on-white crime.

    The attacks on minorities are drawing comparisons, including from Potok, to the days after Brexit, when Britain voted to leave the European Union. Those attacks died down in a few weeks, Potok said.

    But he added that American white nationalist groups are declaring victory online after Trump's election.

    "One would hope that well-meaning citizens would stand up and defend their fellow Americans against this kind of hatred, and I think that's starting to happen, especially in schools," he said.

    The SPLC has created an online forum where people can report hate incidents: splcenter.org/reporthate.



    Photo Credit: NBC10 Philadelphia

    The word The word "Trump" with a swastika replacing the T was one of several pro-Trump or Nazi messages found on buildings in South Philadelphia hours after Donald Trump became president-elect on Wednesday, November 9, 2016.

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    The Dow Jones industrial average hit a new all-time intraday of 18,873.6, and closed more than 200 points higher Thursday, as Wall Street fears related to Donald Trump's election win gave way to hopes that the president-elect's policies could boost the economy, CNBC reported.

    The S&P 500 gyrated between gains and losses, holding about 0.4 percent higher, with financials rising 4 percent to lead advancers.

    The dollar index, which measures the U.S. currency's performance against a basket of currencies, rose 0.29 percent Thursday, with the euro near $1.089 percent. The safe-haven yen fell more than 1 percent versus the greenback, trading around 106.80.

    It marked the second day of what investors have dubbed the "Trump Bounce."



    Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images

    A Wall Street sign is displayed in front of the New York Stock Exchange.A Wall Street sign is displayed in front of the New York Stock Exchange.

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    Will President Donald Trump still be able to fire off 3 a.m. tweets from a smart phone?

    That may come down to a political decision by his staff. But as a security matter, he could do it — just not with an unmodified, off-the-shelf phone, says a former senior National Security Agency official who retrofit President Obama's first Blackberry handheld.

    "There are things an adversary can to do a cellphone — turn on the mic, for example — that make it really dangerous for a guy in his position to carry an unmodified device," the former official told NBC News.

    When President Obama took office in 2009, he was a Blackberry user, and he was allowed to keep one specially-modified by the NSA — but only to email a small circle of family members and colleagues.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov., 9, 2016, in New York City.Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov., 9, 2016, in New York City.

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    Kidde is recalling 3.6 million smoke alarms in the United States, and another 1.5 mllion in Canada, the company and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Thursday.

    The recall involves the Kidde NightHawk talking combo smoke/carbon monoxide alarm with model number KN-COSM-IB and manufacture dates between June 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2010. 

    The alarm can fail to continue to chirp when it reaches its seven year end-of-life, even if the batteries are replaced, leading consumers to believe it is still working. Kidde has received eight reports of incidents with the recalled alarms; no injuries have been reported.

    Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled alarms and contact Kidde   for a free replacement alarm. 

    Consumer Contact: Kidde toll-free at 855-239-0490 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.kidde.com and click on "Product Safety Notice" for more information.


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    Despite Donald Trump's election victory, his campaign committee continues to seek money from supporters, calling into question the amount of debt the campaign racked up in the final days of the race, NBC News reported.

    An email to supporters with the subject line "Thank You," has a bright red "Contribute" button at the bottom of the email.

    Campaign finance law says a candidate can continue to raise money after Election Day to pay off any debts or to raise money for re-election.

    Debt is a possibility. At the end of the last fundraising report on Oct. 20, Trump had an uninspiring $16 million cash on hand and was also $2 million in debt.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech as his son Barron Trump and wife Melania Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech as his son Barron Trump and wife Melania Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.

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    The second-largest Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree ever a 94-foot tall, 56-foot in diameter, 14-ton Norway spruce was cut down in Oneonta, New York and hoisted by two huge cranes onto a 115-foot long trailer for the drive to Rockefeller Center on Thursday. The process all started seven months ago when Rockefeller Center head gardener Erik Pauze spotted it in the backyard of the Eichler family. "Once you find the tree, you approach the owners and tell them you would like to use it," Pauze said. "Then you feed it. It's several months of work."

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    Life for the undocumented has always carried a level of risk and uncertainty. But now the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, after a campaign pledging mass deportation, has elevated their concern.

    "It means fear. It means careful," said Maru Galvan, who remains undocumented 16 years after she and her husband immigrated to California from Mexico, raising two children and opening a carpentry shop. "We have to be more careful."

    Since the election, there have been cases of undocumented workers hesitant to go to their job, and children of undocumented parents expressing fear of going to school, according to immigrant rights advocates. Some expressed concern that some who denounce the undocumented will be emboldened.

    "They think they have the right now to be violent, more racist," Galvan said.

    California is home to more than two million undocumented immigrants according to the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC).

    The undocumented population of Los Angeles County has been estimated as high as 800,000, or nearly 12 percent of the county's 10 million residents. Undocumented immigrants live in every county of the state with 170,000 estimated in San Diego County, according to the PPIC.

    The presence of undocumented immigrants has been a divisive issue for decades, with advocates for strict enforcement of immigration law insisting that those who entered the U.S. unlawfully simply have no legal right to stay.

    Supporters of extending rights to those without papers, including elected officials from the city, county and school district, came together in a coalition Thursday at Los Angeles City Hall. They offered reassurance to the undocumented that local government is not in sync with the policy positions and comments of the President-elect during his campaign -- creating a deportation force, building a wall along America's southern border, and requiring Mexico to pay for it.

    "California is unlike the rest of the country," said Hilda Solis, a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

    "We want people in the community to be calm and continue their daily lives," said Gil Cedillo, Los Angeles city councilman for the first district, which has a predominantly Latino population.

    "This city, this police department, will not cooperate with immigration," said Cedillo, referring to department policies not to inquire about immigration status in the course of responding to calls for service, nor to permit federal immigration enforcement officials to question people under their watch in jail.

    "Nothing has changed in LAPD polices," said Deputy Chief Robert Arcos.

    Los Angeles designated itself a sanctuary city decades ago, but some have expressed concern that under the incoming administration in Washington, federal funding to the city could be cut if it does not comply with immigration law.

    U.S. Senator-elect Kamala Harris offered her continued support for providing services to the undocumented during a noon hour visit to the office of the Coalition for Humane Immigration Reform of Los Angeles (CHIRLA).

    "At this point in time we are all being challenged to fight for our ideals," said Harris. She said she will join the push for the comprehensive immigration form that the Obama Administration has sought, but acknowledged the decreasing likelihood with Trump's presidency and Republicans holding a majority in both houses of Congress.

    Since 2012, an executive order by President Obama known as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has offered permits to stay that are renewable every two years. 

    "My main concern is the children. They have a lot of fear," said Vicky Cerpa, a CHIRLA volunteer who herself went a decade undocumented. She obtained legal residency through the amnesty granted by the the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, signed by then-President Ronald Reagan.

    "You have scared children," said Steve Zimmer, board president of the Los Angeles Unified School District, directing his comments to President-elect Trump. "One of most important things you can do is make sure that children who have qualified for DACA know that they are safe and their status is secure."

    Opponents of Trump's announced crackdown on illegal immigration expressed the belief that as president he will find the wall and mass deportation not feasible. Other Trump critics said the emphasis should be on, not reassurance, but a call for action.

    "Our message to the community: don't mourn -- organize," said Nativo Lopez of Hermandad Mexicana, speaking with the coalition in city hall. "Yes my message is a tad different from the group here. Be concerned. Be alarmed. Rise and organize to defend your families. That is your God-given right," Lopez said.

    "The struggle is just beginning," said Cerpa, citing the impact of the election. "It didn't end. It's just beginning."



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    Maru Galvan is undocumented and lives in Los Angeles County. She is fearful of being deported after Donald Trump was elected president.Maru Galvan is undocumented and lives in Los Angeles County. She is fearful of being deported after Donald Trump was elected president.

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    Margot Gerster posted on Facebook that she was feeling so "heartbroken" after the election that she decided to go for a walk Thursday.

    The White Plains, N.Y., resident took her daughters to one of their "favorite places" in Chappaqua, N.Y. It turns out Chappaqua's most famous couple were also on a head-clearing hike.

    Gerster spelled out her encounter on Facebook:

    "We were the only ones there and it was so beautiful and relaxing. As we were leaving, I heard a bit of rustling coming towards me and as I stepped into the clearing there she was, Hillary Clinton and Bill with their dogs doing exactly the same thing as I was."

    "I got to hug her and talk to her and tell her that one of my most proudest moments as a mother was taking Phoebe with me to vote for her," she continued.

    She said Clinton hugged her back and "exchanged some sweet pleasantries and then I let them continue their walk. Now, I'm not one for signs but I think ill [sic] definitely take this one. So proud."

    Gerster posted a photo with her description of the meeting in Chappaqua, about 40 miles north of New York City. The photographer? Bill Clinton.



    Photo Credit: Margot Gerster
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    Mom taking a hike runs into Hillary Clinton this afternoon. Bill Clinton took the photo.Mom taking a hike runs into Hillary Clinton this afternoon. Bill Clinton took the photo.

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    Parents and school officials in Utah say minority students are being harassed after the results of the 2016 presidential election came out in favor of Donald Trump.

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    Mayte Lara, a freshman studying at the University of Texas with a DACA permit, fears deportation after her tweet about being an undocumented valedictorian went viral in June.

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    Protestors and critics of President-elect Donald Trump clash with police in Portland, Ore., when they refused to disperse after an anti-Trump demonstration ended.

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    A protest in Portland, Oregon, against Donald Trump's election boiled over into what police described as a "riot" overnight after some demonstrators armed with bats smashed stores and cars, and others lit fires.

    Police arrested 26 people, but said many in the crowd were trying to stop those responsible from vandalizing property.

    Trump initially tweeted saying that the "professional protesters" had been "incited by the media" and called the situation "very unfair!" He followed that up with a more positive message early Friday: "Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud!"

    People have taken to the streets in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Denver and elsewhere, rallying around the slogan "not my president."



    Photo Credit: AP
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    Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.

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    A technical issue at with a computer IT firm briefly caused technical problems for airlines in the United States early Friday afternoon, according to American Airlines.

    It was one of several air carriers affected by the outage at Sabre, which tweeted about 12:45 p.m. ET that it was working on recovering from unspecified issues customers were facing.

    American didn't provide more details about what systems and airlines were affected. Reports on Twitter indicated outages at American, Alaska Airlines and JetBlue; all three responded to several tweets about saying computers, kiosks or the website not working.

    American Air confirmed that the issue was with Sabre, and that it affected more than one airline.

    "Earlier today, Sabre had a brief technical issue that impacted multiple carriers, including American. This technical issue has been resolved. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience," the company said in a statement.

    An FAA representative told NBC it was checking on the reports.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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    This year's Veterans Day parade in Tulsa, Oklahoma, will not include the Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR. This year CAIR's application to participate in the 2016 Veterans Day parade was denied.

    Photo Credit: KJRH-TV

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    Donald Trump's transition team continued to fill out their list of potential cabinet picks, many of whom are part of the establishment, or, in Trump's words, part of the swamp that he promised to drain, NBC News reported.

    Sources told NBC News that Texas Rep. Mike McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, is being considered for Secretary of Homeland Security; former Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers, a past chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, is on the list for Director of the CIA; while Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling, chairman of the Financial Services Committee, is in the mix for Treasury Secretary.

    One of the more unexpected names to come up Thursday was JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Dimon's chief of staff confirmed to NBC News that, though Trump has had no formal conversation with him, some of Trump's senior advisers have told Dimon he would make an "excellent" Treasury Secretary.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania walk with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, after a meeting.President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania walk with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, after a meeting.

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    After learning the results of the polarizing presidential election, Theresa Govert, of East Haddam, Connecticut, felt compelled to paint a sign with a powerful message for her town. Someone vandalized it within a day and spray-painted "Trump 2016" over it.

    The sign says, "Dear Muslims, immigrants, women, disabled, LGBTQ and all people of color, we love you boldly and proudly. We will endure." The message was taken from a tweet by writer and activist Shaun King.

    Govert said she thought it was something people needed to see after the election.

    "I just wanted to make sure that even in our small community that anyone who did feel marginalized felt supported and it's about coming together," she said.

    Govert painted the sign and put it up at Wilmer F Palmer Road and Route 149 on Wednesday afternoon. By Thursday morning, someone had spray-painted over the message with "Trump 2016."

    Govert said she knew when she painted the sign that there was a chance someone might deface the sign. But she wasn't expecting it to happen with the name of the president-elect.

    "A sign that is encouraging love to use his name to do the opposite seems counterproductive," she said.

    Residents who were supportive of the sign's original message were shocked by the vandalism.

    "I hope that's not the message that the Trump presidency has, to be racist and prejudiced," said George Hungerford, a lifelong East Haddam resident.

    "Unless you have everyone together, you cannot make America great again," Kate O'Boyle said.

    Another longtime resident, Nancy Murray, was so shocked by the sign that she bought a bucket of paint and painted over the graffiti.

    "They're trying to divide us," she said. "We just don't want division here."

    Govert said she plans to paint another sign with the same message and post it again.



    Photo Credit: Theresa Govert
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    Theresa Govert painted the original sign and vandals painted over it.Theresa Govert painted the original sign and vandals painted over it.

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    San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick did not exercise his right to vote in the presidential election Tuesday, CSN Bay Area reported.

    “For me, it’s another face that’s going to be the face of that system of oppression, and to me, it didn’t really matter who went in there. The system still remains intact that oppresses people of color,” he reportedly said Wednesday on a conference call set up to discuss with reporters the 49ers' upcoming game against the Cardinals.

    Two ESPN personalities, Stephen A. Smith and Bomani Jones, had very different reactions to Kaepernick's reported decision not to vote.

    Kaepernick has grabbed nationwide attention ever since sitting on the bench during the playing of the national anthem during a preseason game in August in an attempt to bring attention to racial injustice and police brutality.

    Since that time, the quarterback has not been afraid to talk politics or mince words about the major parties' presidential candidates.

    Kaepernick was quoted in September calling both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump "proven liars" and mentioned that watching both candidates battle for the White House was "embarrassing."

    "At this point, in talking to one of my friends, you have to pick the lesser of two evils, but in the end, it's still evil," Kaepernick said two months ago.

    The San Francisco signal-caller also attacked the Republican candidate's campaign slogan.

    "He always says 'Make America Great Again,'" Kaepernick said in September. "Well, America's never been great for people of color. And that's something that needs to be addressed. Let's make America great for the first time."

    Trump fired back and called Kaepernick's protest "a terrible thing" and suggested that the professional football player "find a country that works better for him."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers at his home field Levi's Stadium prior to their NFL game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on October 23, 2016, in Santa Clara, California. Kaepernick has recently been vocal about politics, especially on matters of race, but reportedly did not vote in the presidential election.Colin Kaepernick #7 of the San Francisco 49ers at his home field Levi's Stadium prior to their NFL game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on October 23, 2016, in Santa Clara, California. Kaepernick has recently been vocal about politics, especially on matters of race, but reportedly did not vote in the presidential election.

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    A suburban woman who waited every one of her 108 years for the Chicago Cubs to win a World Series died shortly after the team finally accomplished that historic feat last week.

    Mabel Ball, 108, died Tuesday at Covenant Village of Northbrook, the facility said Friday. 

    Ball, who was born the year the Cubs last won a World Series, 1908, made headlines during the team’s iconic postseason run as one of the oldest living fans of the North Side team.

    Ball had only managed to go to one game at Wrigley Field — when she was 90 years old, as a birthday treat from her kids, according to the Chicago Tribune.

    Shortly before she passed away, Ball’s son reportedly told her she’d become “a little bit of a low-level celebrity” after her story had appeared in newspapers and on televisions across the country and around the world.

    “It’s a lot of nonsense,” Rich Ball said his mother replied. "That was her, all over. She was already a great person. You couldn't make her bigger by calling her a celebrity."

    The Cubs won their first World Series 1908 last week, a historic win that has resonated and been celebrated across the globe.



    Photo Credit: Rich Ball/Covenant Village of Northbrook

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    President-elect Donald Trump's transition team includes some of the most conservative opponents to illegal immigration, NBC News reported.

    Kris Kobach, Kansas' secretary of state, who is a champion of tough anti-illegal immigration laws and ideas, has been hired as part of the team.

    According to a document obtained by The New York Times, Danielle Cutrona is leading the "Immigration Reform & Building the Wall" component of Trump's transition. She is Sen. Jeff Sessions' counsel on the Judiciary Committee. Sessions has long opposed illegal — and many forms of legal — immigration.

    "There's going to be a lot to do there in part because Mr. Trump and Mr. Obama are diametric opposites when it comes to immigration policy," Kobach told Kansas' KWCH. "So there will be a lot of changes."



    Photo Credit: AP

    In this Nov. 4, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Hershey, Pennsylvania.In this Nov. 4, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

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