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    Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, Hillary Clinton's running mate, introduced Clinton Wednesday morning before she delivered her concession speech. He cited William Faulkner in his remarks: "They killed us, but they ain't whooped us yet!" He went on to say, "We know that the work remains. We know that the dreams of empowering families and children remains."

    Photo Credit: NBC Washington

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    Republican Donald Trump, who entered politics after a career in real estate and reality TV, defied pollsters and pundits Tuesday to defeat Democrat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. "Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division," Trump told a crowd of joyous supporters early Wednesday.

    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump pumps his fist after giving his acceptance speech as his wife Melania Trump, right, and their son Barron Trump follow him during his election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.President-elect Donald Trump pumps his fist after giving his acceptance speech as his wife Melania Trump, right, and their son Barron Trump follow him during his election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.

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    Donald Trump has vowed to deport undocumented immigrants from the United States, but after his victory was announced early Wednesday, undocumented immigrants answered back on Twitter, NBC News reported.

    They expressed solidarity against the president-elect's deportation promise, with #HereToStay beginning to trend on Twitter.

    "I'm 18.. I've lived here for 17 years... This is my home.. #HereToStay," one user wrote.

    Trump announced his candidacy last year by vowing to build a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico to keep out “rapists and murderers.” His proposed deportation policy would impact as many as 11 million undocumented immigrants.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov. 9, 2016, in New York City.Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Nov. 9, 2016, in New York City.

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    President Barack Obama addressed the nation on Nov. 9, after congratulating president-election Donald Trump in the early morning hours for his win. Watch his full remarks here.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    President Barack Obama makes a statement on the election results at the Rose Garden of the White House Nov. 9, 2016, in Washington, DC.President Barack Obama makes a statement on the election results at the Rose Garden of the White House Nov. 9, 2016, in Washington, DC.

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    Donald Trump's most loyal supporters were being considered for positions in his presidential cabinet, among them former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and former U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich, sources have told NBC News.

    Trump will become the 45th president after a stunning upset over Hillary Clinton. With several states still too close to call, Trump won 278 electoral votes to Clinton's 218, according to NBC News' Decision Desk, surpassing the 270 needed to win. 

    Giuliani is being looked at for attorney general. Gingrich, an author of the Contract with America in the mid-1990s while in the Congress representing Georgia, could be a candidate for secretary of state.

    Giuliani, who Tuesday night described a possible Trump victory as the people beating the establishment, demurred when NBC News' Chris Matthews asked him want he might want to do.

    "It's too early for me to think about anything like that," he said.

    Other possible names that have been put forward: retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn for defense secretary or national security adviser; Steve Mnuchin, Trump's finance chairman, for treasury secretary, and Lew Eisenberg, the Republican National Committee finance chairman, for commerce secretary, three campaign advisers told NBC News. Flynn would need a waiver from Congress because he has not been retired from the military for seven years as would be required.

    Reince Priebus, the current chairman of the Republican National Committee who was a staunch Trump defender, could be the chief of staff, according to NBC News.

    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was frequently mentioned as a possible member of a Trump administration before two of his top aides were convicted for causing a traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge as political retribution.

    Helping to vet the names are the conservative Heritage Foundation and Trump's running mate Mike Pence.

    Trump's campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks told NBC News that "none of this is accurate."



    Photo Credit: AP

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, stands with former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani during a campaign rally, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016, in Greenville, N.C. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, stands with former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani during a campaign rally, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016, in Greenville, N.C. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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    On April 30, 2011, after secretly giving the go-ahead to the Navy SEAL operation that would take out Osama bin Laden, President Obama killed at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.

    The primary target captured in his comedic sights: Donald Trump.

    Obama poked fun at Trump's "Birther" campaign – and mocked his hiring and firing of D-listers on "Celebrity Apprentice.”

    "These are the kinds of decisions that keep me up at night. Well handled, sir, well handled," Obama chided.

    Trump, in the audience, smiled as he squirmed. Obama had portrayed him as the thing he hated the most: a loser.

    Maybe he decided to run for president that night. Or maybe he’d long harbored the idea. It's impossible, of course, to get into Trump's head, but far easier as Obama – and eventually Hillary Clinton – found, to get under his orange-tinted skin.

    Trump enjoyed the last laugh early Wednesday as he celebrated a once-unfathomable victory – denying Clinton’s shot at history and making some of his own by going from reality show punch line to commander-in-chief.

    But the 70-year-old Republican also got the job he’s been running for all his public life: celebrity-in-chief. Now Donald Trump is the host of biggest reality show of them all – one with far, far more serious ramifications than fallout over sacking Gary Busey.

    Perhaps that’s a commentary less on Trump than on times where a familiar loud voice offering simplistic quick fixes to complex problems can rouse enough voters to beat a seasoned, if polarizing, political figure.

    Trump's black-and-white, hired-or-fired showman's theatrics couldn’t obscure the demagogic scapegoating at the root of his appeal to many – or his dubious record as a businessman and alleged serial accoster of woman.

    The blustery developer won, in part, by framing the endless campaign as a fight for attention, by any means necessary – including pandering to base xenophobic, racist and misogynist instincts and reflexively insulting critics as if he were feuding with Rosie O'Donnell.

    Slurs extended not only to opponents ("Little Marco"), but to the likes of Sen. John McCain, a former P.O.W., and Gold Star parents. Trump, meanwhile, lauded Russian strongman Vladimir Putin, a stance once unthinkable to both parties.

    Then again, we’ve never had a U.S. presidential candidate who defended his hand size and publicly bragged about his, um, manhood.

    Trump’s tough-guy, easy-answers spiel didn’t employ facts and details as much as cast blame for the country's woes on some of its most vulnerable residents and outside boogeymen. The trash-talking New Yorker got plenty of coverage by giving the news media unfettered access – until he blamed the press for helping “rig” the election he’d eventually win.

    The handsome John Kennedy may have been the first telegenic president. Former movie hunk and California governor Ronald Reagan may have been the Great Communicator. Obama may have spent more time on entertainment television than any other sitting president.

    But Trump, more than any of them, instinctively grasped how to use the media, in its various, morphing forms. He expertly commanded a spotlight driven by a voracious 24-7 Internet and a Kardashian-influenced television landscaped littered with symbiotic pseudo-celebrity “news” and Reality TV.

    Trump also knows how to work a crowd, even if on the campaign trail he regularly contradicted his own past statements. He became a tweeting machine, pumping out put-downs, innuendo, hyperbolic boasts and outright falsehoods at all hours.

    He turned candidate debates into ratings-friendly rules-free spectacles to the point where he wanted CNN to pony up $10 million for charity to secure his participation in the GOP verbal slugfests.

    Both Trump and Clinton tapped into the very real concerns of opposite and overlapping constituencies. But their different approaches reflected their worldviews, their personalities and, crucially in this election like no other, their images.

    In his first speech as president-elect shortly before 3 a.m. Wednesday, a relatively subdued Trump peppered his talk with some of his favorites superlatives – among them “tremendous,” “unbelievable” and, of course, “great.” Among the crowd that joined him on stage: former “Apprentice” contestant Omarosa Manigault.

    Still, Trump offered rare kind words for Clinton, praising her as a worthy adversary.

    Whatever you think of Clinton, there's little doubt the Democratic standard bearer arrived to her three debates with Trump better prepared than him – armed not only with facts, but equipped to battle an unpredictable opponent.

    She tweaked his considerable ego, goading him into bizarrely insulting O'Donnell and former Miss Universe Alicia Machado. He took her bait and even griped about a past Emmys loss.

    That shouldn't have been surprising from a candidate who later would note – erroneously – that both he and Clinton made Barbara Walters' “10 Most Fascinating People” list twice. The opponent he slammed as a "nasty woman" notched the Walters honor four times.

    Clinton also trounced him in celebrity supporter ranks, gaining the backing of Beyoncé, Bruce Springsteen and most of Hollywood. Trump’s “Celebrity Apprentice”-like GOP convention lineup included Scott Baio, “Duck Dynasty” star Willie Robertson and Antonio Sabato, Jr.

    But in the end, no matter how considerable her fame after traveling over a quarter-century from first lady to U.S. senator to secretary of state to the first woman major-party presidential nominee, Clinton couldn’t shake her baggage and the animus she inspired in a significant portion of the populous.

    She also couldn’t compete with Trump in putting on a show – especially a cynical, manipulative exhibition that resonated with enough of a jaded electorate to put self-declared billionaire everyman over the top.

    To detractors, Trump’s unlikely presidential bid started as a comedy routine that morphed into a horror show. To his supporters, reluctant and otherwise, the Trump act appeal ranged from the lesser of evils to a heroic quest to return the country to its yuuuuge past glory.

    Trump’s "Make America Great Again" slogan effectively tapped into an amorphous notion of a time that never actually existed in the U.S. – but evoked the innocuous 1950s TV shows he likely watched as a boy in Queens while the fight for racial equality roiled the country.

    That's part of the illusion the self-proclaimed master of the deal peddled, in dog-whistling speeches, as he sold his greatest and most flawed product: himself. 

    Trump, whose strength and weakness rests in waging a fearless and sometimes reckless improvisation through public life, played the media however it suited him at any given time. He variously wooed, savaged and barred the press. He hosted “Saturday Night Live” last year – and last month tweeted his displeasure at Alec Baldwin’s withering impression of him.

    For all the reportage chronicling his business missteps and accusations of sexual harassment and worse, little stuck until the public heard him utter those course words bragging of his carte blanche to accost women.

    Yet even lording his supposed sexual privilege over half the population wasn’t enough to keep Trump from winning. The man with the outsider persona succeeded in building a near-impenetrable wall – around himself.

    Trump supporters – and Hillary haters – heard only what they wanted to hear from a great exaggerator, whose most accurate grandiose claim may be, “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn't lose voters.”

    Now he’s going from New York and Fifth Avenue, where he lived, worked and filmed his TV show in a gleaming tower, to Washington and Pennsylvania Avenue – a different world, with a very different kind of deal-making structure. In January, the one-time smarmy courter of gossip columnists and Howard Stern will arrive in the nation’s capital to be sworn in as the country’s 45th president and the planet’s most powerful human.

    Perhaps Trump already is working on his standup routine for next year’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, eager to settle plenty of scores with some zingers of his own. But the script of the ultimate reality show has yet to be written.

    Meanwhile, the worldwide audience Donald Trump has always craved will be watching.

    Jere Hester is Director of News Products and Projects at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is also the author of "Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family." Follow him on Twitter.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.President-elect Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during his election night rally, Nov. 9, 2016, in New York.

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    Americans looking to move to Canada now that Donald Trump clinched the presidency have a new social dating app that might help with the process. 

    Maple Match connects Americans and Canadians looking for romance with an added bonus: a chance for a PR card, Canada's version of a green card.

    Maple Match profiles offer an option to list citizenship status and which citizenship you might be interested in obtaining.

    "Tens of thousands of you have told us that they want to use Maple Match for dating, so we look forward to building the best experience out there for meeting quality matches online," the site says. 

    The app surveys users for their political preferences and asks what their ideal partner’s political leaning should be. Unlike other dating apps, there is no “swipe” option on Maple Match. The app picks a set number of potential partners based on user’s preferences. 

    Maple Match was actively tweeting throughout Election Day, reminding Americans of the possibility of obtaining Canadian citizenship. Meanwhile, Canada's immigration website crashed as election results came in. Google trends also reported the highest spike in the "move to Canada" search since 2004.

    Founder and CEO Joe Goldman told NBC that the iOS app officially launched on Saturday, Nov. 5. It has been an iOS beta app since May.

    As of Wednesday morning, Maple Match was ranked the 61st social networking app in the Apple App Store.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    In this file photo Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau offers a hug to the Master of Ceremonies while his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau looks onward during the 38th Annual Vancouver Pride Parade on July 31, 2016 in Vancouver, Canada.In this file photo Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau offers a hug to the Master of Ceremonies while his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau looks onward during the 38th Annual Vancouver Pride Parade on July 31, 2016 in Vancouver, Canada.

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    Donald Trump is now the U.S. president-elect, and after a polarizing and rancorous campaign many parents who supported Hillary Clinton are wondering: "What do I say to my kids?"

    "Today" child development expert and mother of four Dr. Deborah Gilboa recommends parents should keep these things in mind:

    1. Teach your kids about how the government works, especially about the system of checks and balances.

    2. Read stories with them that align with your values.

    3. Get your kids involved in spreading messages of love.

    4. Don't lie about what happened. 

    5. If your daughter was excited for the first female president, remind her the fight is not over.

    6. Don't make unnecessary jokes, such as saying you are moving to Canada.

    7. If your child is worried about friends or family who are immigrants, be honest but optimistic about the future.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/Hoxton

    Don't lie to your kids about the election, a childhood development expert says.Don't lie to your kids about the election, a childhood development expert says.

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    Hillary Clinton, in her concession speech, assured that a woman would ascend to the presidency one day, and encouraged young women to remain hopeful and strong.

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    House Speaker Paul Ryan spoke at a press conference in Wisconsin Wednesday, calling Donald Trump's win "the most incredible political feat I've seen in my lifetime.'

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    New Hampshire Governor Maggie Hassan has declared victory over incumbent Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte in the New Hampshire Senate race.

    Hassan announced the results Wednesday morning. She said there are a few votes left to count, but that she is confident she maintains the lead.

    NBC News' decision desk says the race is too close to call. With 98 percent of precincts reporting as of 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Hassan had 353,978 votes to Ayotte's 353,262.

    Kelly for New Hampshire spokeswoman Liz Johnson released the following statement: "This has been a closely contested race from the beginning and we look forward to results being announced by the secretary of state, and ensuring that every vote is counted in this race that has received an historic level of interest."

    Hassan said, "I believe we are stronger when we listen to all voices and all perspectives. We are stronger when we are working to ensure that every person has the opportunity to share in our nation's success."

    She said she had not yet heard from Ayotte.

    She added that she is excited to get to work.

    "In the United States Senate, I will always put the people of New Hampshire first," she said.

    Ayotte said she did not expect to know whether she won or lost the U.S. Senate race on Tuesday night. But she said she felt "really upbeat" about her chances.



    Photo Credit: necn

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    Hillary Clinton's bid to become the first female president of the United States ended in defeat early Wednesday, November 9, 2016. She conceded the election to Donald Trump in a phone call, then gave this speech at a New York hotel hours later.

    Thank you. Thank you all. Thank you.
    Thank you all very much. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much.
    Very rowdy group. Thank you, my friends. Thank you. Thank you, thank you so very much for being here and I love you all, too.
    Last night, I congratulated Donald Trump and offered to work with him on behalf of our country. I hope that he will be a successful president for all Americans. This is not the outcome we wanted or we worked so hard for and I'm sorry that we did not win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country.
    But I feel, I feel pride and gratitude for this wonderful campaign that we built together, this vast, diverse, creative, unruly, energized campaign. You represent the best of America and being your candidate has been one of the greatest honors of my life.
    I, I know how disappointed you feel because I feel it too, and so do tens of millions of Americans who invested their hopes and dreams in this effort. This is painful and it will be for a long time, but I want you to remember this. Our campaign was never about one person or even one election, it was about the country we love and about building an America that's hopeful, inclusive and big-hearted.
    We have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought. But I still believe in America and I always will. And if you do, then we must accept this result and then look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead.
    Our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer of power and we don't just respect that, we cherish it. It also enshrines other things; the rule of law, the principle that we are all equal in rights and dignity, freedom of worship and expression. We respect and cherish these values too and we must defend them.
    Now -- and, and let me add, our constitutional democracy demands our participation, not just every four years but all the time. So let's do all we can to keep advancing the causes and values we all hold dear; making our economy work for everyone not just those at the top, protecting our country and protecting our planet and breaking down all the barriers that hold any American back from achieving their dreams.
    We've spent a year and a half bringing together millions of people from every corner of our country to say with one voice that we believe that the American dream is big enough for everyone -- for people of all races and religions, for men and women, for immigrants, for LGBT people, and people with disabilities. For everyone.
    So now, our responsibility as citizens is to keep doing our part to build that better, stronger, fairer America we seek. And I know you will. I am so grateful to stand with all of you. I want to thank Tim Kaine and Anne Holton for being our partners on this journey.
    It has been a joy getting to know them better, and it gives me great hope and comfort to know that Tim will remain on the front lines of our democracy representing Virginia in the Senate.
    To Barack and Michelle Obama, our country owes you an enormous debt of gratitude.
    We -- we thank you for your graceful, determined leadership that has meant so much to so many Americans and people across the world.
    And to Bill and Chelsea, Mark, Charlotte, Aidan, our brothers and our entire family, my love for you means more than I can ever express. You crisscrossed this country on our behalf and lifted me up when I needed it most -- even four-month-old Aidan who traveled with his mom.
    You poured your hearts into this campaign. For some of you who are veterans, it was a campaign after you had done other campaigns. Some of you, it was your first campaign. I want each of you to know that you were the best campaign anybody could have ever expected or wanted.
    And to the millions of volunteers, community leaders, activists and union organizers who knocked on doors, talked to neighbors, posted on Facebook, even in secret, private Facebook sites. I want everybody coming out from behind that and make sure your voices are heard going forward.
    To everyone who sent in contributions as small at $5 and kept us going, thank you. Thank you from all of us.
    And to the young people in particular, I hope you will hear this. I have, as Tim said, spent my entire adult life fighting for what I believe in. I've had successes and I've had setbacks. Sometimes, really painful ones. Many of you are at the beginning of your professional public and political careers. You will have successes and setbacks, too.
    This loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what's right is worth it. It is -- it is worth it.
    And so we need -- we need you to keep up these fights now and for the rest of your lives. And to all the women, and especially the young women, who put their faith in this campaign and in me, I want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion.
    Now, I -- I know -- I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but some day someone will and hopefully sooner than we might think right now.
    And -- and to all the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams.
    Finally, finally, I am so grateful for our country and for all it has given to me. I count my blessings every single day that I am an American. And I still believe as deeply as I ever have that if we stand together and work together with respect for our differences, strength in our convictions and love for this nation, our best days are still ahead of us.
    Because, you know -- you know, I believe we are stronger together and we will go forward together. And you should never, ever regret fighting for that. You know, scripture tells us, "Let us not grow weary in doing good, for in due season, we shall reap if we do not lose heart."
    So my friends, let us have faith in each other, let us not grow weary, let us not lose heart, for there are more seasons to come. And there is more work to do. I am incredibly honored and grateful to have had this chance to represent all of you in this consequential election.
    May God bless you and may God bless the United States of America.

    Thank you. Thank you all. Thank you.

    Thank you all very much. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much.

    Very rowdy group. Thank you, my friends. Thank you. Thank you, thank you so very much for being here and I love you all, too.

    Last night, I congratulated Donald Trump and offered to work with him on behalf of our country. I hope that he will be a successful president for all Americans. This is not the outcome we wanted or we worked so hard for and I'm sorry that we did not win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country.

    But I feel, I feel pride and gratitude for this wonderful campaign that we built together, this vast, diverse, creative, unruly, energized campaign. You represent the best of America and being your candidate has been one of the greatest honors of my life.

    I, I know how disappointed you feel because I feel it too, and so do tens of millions of Americans who invested their hopes and dreams in this effort. This is painful and it will be for a long time, but I want you to remember this. Our campaign was never about one person or even one election, it was about the country we love and about building an America that's hopeful, inclusive and big-hearted.

    We have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought. But I still believe in America and I always will. And if you do, then we must accept this result and then look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president. We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead.

    Our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer of power and we don't just respect that, we cherish it. It also enshrines other things; the rule of law, the principle that we are all equal in rights and dignity, freedom of worship and expression. We respect and cherish these values too and we must defend them.

    Now -- and, and let me add, our constitutional democracy demands our participation, not just every four years but all the time. So let's do all we can to keep advancing the causes and values we all hold dear; making our economy work for everyone not just those at the top, protecting our country and protecting our planet and breaking down all the barriers that hold any American back from achieving their dreams.

    We've spent a year and a half bringing together millions of people from every corner of our country to say with one voice that we believe that the American dream is big enough for everyone -- for people of all races and religions, for men and women, for immigrants, for LGBT people, and people with disabilities. For everyone.

    So now, our responsibility as citizens is to keep doing our part to build that better, stronger, fairer America we seek. And I know you will. I am so grateful to stand with all of you. I want to thank Tim Kaine and Anne Holton for being our partners on this journey.

    It has been a joy getting to know them better, and it gives me great hope and comfort to know that Tim will remain on the front lines of our democracy representing Virginia in the Senate.

    To Barack and Michelle Obama, our country owes you an enormous debt of gratitude.

    We -- we thank you for your graceful, determined leadership that has meant so much to so many Americans and people across the world.

    And to Bill and Chelsea, Mark, Charlotte, Aidan, our brothers and our entire family, my love for you means more than I can ever express. You crisscrossed this country on our behalf and lifted me up when I needed it most -- even four-month-old Aidan who traveled with his mom.

    You poured your hearts into this campaign. For some of you who are veterans, it was a campaign after you had done other campaigns. Some of you, it was your first campaign. I want each of you to know that you were the best campaign anybody could have ever expected or wanted.

    And to the millions of volunteers, community leaders, activists and union organizers who knocked on doors, talked to neighbors, posted on Facebook, even in secret, private Facebook sites. I want everybody coming out from behind that and make sure your voices are heard going forward.

    To everyone who sent in contributions as small at $5 and kept us going, thank you. Thank you from all of us.

    And to the young people in particular, I hope you will hear this. I have, as Tim said, spent my entire adult life fighting for what I believe in. I've had successes and I've had setbacks. Sometimes, really painful ones. Many of you are at the beginning of your professional public and political careers. You will have successes and setbacks, too.

    This loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what's right is worth it. It is -- it is worth it.

    And so we need -- we need you to keep up these fights now and for the rest of your lives. And to all the women, and especially the young women, who put their faith in this campaign and in me, I want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion.

    Now, I -- I know -- I know we have still not shattered that highest and hardest glass ceiling, but some day someone will and hopefully sooner than we might think right now.

    And -- and to all the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams.

    Finally, finally, I am so grateful for our country and for all it has given to me. I count my blessings every single day that I am an American. And I still believe as deeply as I ever have that if we stand together and work together with respect for our differences, strength in our convictions and love for this nation, our best days are still ahead of us.

    Because, you know -- you know, I believe we are stronger together and we will go forward together. And you should never, ever regret fighting for that. You know, scripture tells us, "Let us not grow weary in doing good, for in due season, we shall reap if we do not lose heart."

    So my friends, let us have faith in each other, let us not grow weary, let us not lose heart, for there are more seasons to come. And there is more work to do. I am incredibly honored and grateful to have had this chance to represent all of you in this consequential election.

    May God bless you and may God bless the United States of America.



    Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton (left) and running mate Tim Kaine, concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on Wednesday, November 9, 2016, in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, accompanied by her husband former President Bill Clinton (left) and running mate Tim Kaine, concedes the presidential election at the New Yorker Hotel on Wednesday, November 9, 2016, in New York City. Republican candidate Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential election in the early hours of the morning in a widely unforeseen upset.

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    Hillary Clinton said she felt "pride and gratitude" for her campaign on Wednesday morning, hours after her shocking defeat at the hands of Donald Trump.

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    As the remaining ballots cast in Tuesday's presidential election are counted Wednesday, there's the possibility Hillary Clinton will win the popular vote after having lost the electoral college to Donald Trump.

    As of 10:12 a.m. Wednesday, Clinton held a lead of more than 170,000 votes nationally, NBC News reported. She conceded the race, however, early Wednesday morning after Trump took Wisconsin, putting the electoral college out of her reach. 

    If Clinton wins the popular vote after losing the electoral college, it would be the second time in 16 years a Democratic nominee has done so. 

    In 2000, Al Gore lost the electoral college to George W. Bush, but won the popular vote by more than 500,000 votes.

    Three other nominees have taken the presidency without winning the national vote, all in the 19th century.

    In 1888, Benjamin Harrison defeated Grover Cleveland without carrying the popular vote. Just 11 years prior, Rutherford B. Hayes defeated Samuel J. Tilden by one electoral vote, but lost the popular vote, according to factcheck.org

    And in the 1824 election, John Quincy Adams defeated Andrew Jackson without winning the electoral college or the popular vote. Jackson carried a majority of the popular vote in the election, but neither he nor Adams won a majority of electoral votes. 

    The election was sent to the House of Representatives, which chose Adams as president. 

    The electoral college was established in the Constitution. In the system, electors appointed by the winning party cast votes for their nominee based on the popular vote in the state. Each elector is granted one vote for president and one vote for vice president. 

    Most states require all electoral votes go to the winner of the popular vote, except for Maine and Nebraska, which use a "district system." 

    In the district system, two electors vote based on the popular vote, and another elector casts a ballot based on each congressional district's popular vote. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Voting booths are set up for early voting at the Black Hawk County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 in Waterloo, Iowa. Early voting starts today in Iowa where in the 2008 election 36 percent of voters cast an early ballot.Voting booths are set up for early voting at the Black Hawk County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 in Waterloo, Iowa. Early voting starts today in Iowa where in the 2008 election 36 percent of voters cast an early ballot.

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    Donald Trump's campaign prepared both a concession speech and a victory speech for Election Night, sources told NBC News.

    More time was spent on a concession speech, as the campaign's own data showed only a narrow path to the 270 electorates needed to win the White House.

    His campaign felt pressure to acknowledge the outcome of potential defeatafter Trump's repeated comments about a "rigged" system and concern over whether he would accept the results of the election. But as results poured in and a victory seemed likely, the victory speech was revised in real time.

    Trump's running mate Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and writer and policy adviser Steve Miller worked with him to write the speech.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs up to the crowd during his acceptance speech at his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Sources say that the Trump campaign wrote two speeches for the evening, but worked more on a concession speech than the victory speech he gave.Republican president-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs up to the crowd during his acceptance speech at his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City. Sources say that the Trump campaign wrote two speeches for the evening, but worked more on a concession speech than the victory speech he gave.

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    An Oceanside man who died of natural causes in September was elected to office in the coastal San Diego County city more than a month later, officials confirmed Wednesday.

    Gary Ernst was elected to Oceanside City Treasurer by a six percent margin over challenger Nadine Scott. The election results are expected to be certified on December 7th by the city council.

    Ernst died Sept. 23 which did not allow enough time to remove his name from the ballot.

    With all precincts reporting, Ernst earned 17,659 votes.

    City councilmembers can declare the seat vacant since the winner cannot physically take office, according to Oceanside’s City Attorney John Mullen. That will lead to either an appointment or a special election.

    If city leaders choose to appoint someone for two years, the decision must be made within 60 days, Mullen said.



    Photo Credit: NBC 7

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    Donald Trump, speaking from New York City, addressed his supporters after he was elected president of the United States. “It’s been what they call a historic event,” Trump said. “But to be really historic we have to do a great job and I promise you that I will not let you down.”

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    How stressful was the 2016 election season? So stressful that therapy dogs were brought to Capitol Hill today. Two golden doodles, two American Eskimo dogs, and a beagle mix mingled with staffers in the Cannon House office building. Organizers say it was a great way for workers to blow off steam especially for those whose bosses may have lost re-election bids.

    Photo Credit: NBC News

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    Donald Trump's win along with the Republican sweep of the House and Senate give the GOP singular power to undo President Barack Obama's signature accomplishments and enact the party's key policies, NBC News reported. 

    Republicans did not win 60 votes in the Senate, so Democrats could use filibusters in that chamber, but congressional Republicans have already suggested they will use a budget process called reconciliation, by which bills in the Senate only require 51 votes, to either eliminate or dramatically overhaul Obamacare. 

    Trump is likely to nominate a strong conservative to fill the seat on the Supreme Court that has been vacant since Antonin Scalia died earlier this year. A Trump selection would be the fifth GOP-appointed justice on the Court, ensuring a conservative majority there.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President Barack Obama walks out of the main residence of the White House and down the Colonnade and heads towards the Oval Office, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Washington.President Barack Obama walks out of the main residence of the White House and down the Colonnade and heads towards the Oval Office, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016, in Washington.

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    NBC News’ Chuck Todd described Donald Trump’s surprise victory — which none of the polls or political experts correctly predicted — as rural America “screaming at us, saying, ‘stop overlooking us!’”

    Exit polls bore this out. While Clinton hit her targets in cities, Trump outperformed Mitt Romney in rural and ex-urban districts. He won among non-college educated white voters by larger margins than Romney did in 2012; Trump was winning this group by 34 percent while Romney won by 26 percent.

    Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who could become Trump’s attorney general, agreed, saying the vote was an expression of resentment against the “eastern arrogant establishment.”



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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