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US and World News

older | 1 | .... | 839 | 840 | (Page 841) | 842 | 843 | .... | 906 | newer

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    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he was "really disturbed" by the predatory comments Donald Trump made about women a decade ago, but he is still supporting the Republican nominee for president. 

    Christie had been mum on the matter since the video was released late last week, but broke his silence Tuesday as he co-hosted WFAN's "Boomer & Carton" sports radio show with Craig Carton. 

    "It's completely indefensible and I won't defend it and haven't defended it," Christie said. "That kind of talk and conversation even in private is just unacceptable." 

    The Republican governor revealed he was with Trump when Trump found out about the video leak. Christie said he does not believe Trump's apology -- where the former reality television star referred to his past comments as "locker room banter" and said he was embarrassed by them -- was sufficient. 

    He acknowledged that the content of the video is "a little tough to explain" when you have kids and said it was not "immaterial" in deciding who to vote for, but that it should not be the only factor on Election Day. 

    "I'm really upset about what I heard but in the end this election is about bigger issues than that," Christie said. "I'm still supporting Donald. Obviously I was disappointed by what happened and disappointed in some respects by the response initially but I am still supporting him." 

    The issue of the video took center stage at Sunday's presidential debate, dominating social media discussion and overshadowing concerns about domestic policy and foreign relations. 

    Meanwhile, a reeling Republican party is struggling to deal with the backlash. Forty Republican senators and congressmen have revoked their support for Trump — with nearly 30 of them calling on him to quit the race altogether in recent days. Few were passionate Trump supporters to begin with, the last straw being the video in which the candidate denigrated women. 

    House Speaker Paul Ryan told fellow lawmakers on Monday he would not campaign for or defend the floundering businessman in the election's closing weeks. But the head of the Republican National Committee declared he was in full coordination with the embattled presidential nominee — opposing positions that highlight a political party increasingly battling itself as Election Day approaches.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie at a campaign event Thursday, May 19, 2016, in Lawrenceville, N.J.Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, stands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie at a campaign event Thursday, May 19, 2016, in Lawrenceville, N.J.

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    A bald eagle that somehow managed to get wedged in the front grill of a Florida car was freed unharmed after a passing motorist noticed the bird just after Hurricane Matthew roared past the area. The Clay County Sheriff's Office says rescue personnel and deputies were able to work the bird free. It was taken to a wildlife sanctuary in Jacksonville but authorities say the eagle appears to be unharmed.

    Photo Credit: Clay County Sheriff

    A bald eagle was found in the front grill of a car near Jacksonville.A bald eagle was found in the front grill of a car near Jacksonville.

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    The Cincinnati Zoo began Halloween celebrations by giving its gorillas pumpkins filled with cooked macaroni and Jell-O. Visitors looked on as the gorillas enjoyed their treats.

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    Michelle Obama will continue her advocacy for girls’ education by hosting a Skype discussion on the subject on Tuesday, NBC News reported.

    The conversation will revolve around challenges of accessibility in education faced by girls around the world. Glamour’s editor-in-chief, Cindi Leive is partnering with the first lady to host the event, which is part of the United Nation’s International Day of the Girl. Girls around the world are invited to participate by sharing their stories and goals on Skype and on Facebook Live.

    Obama has long been vocal about girls’ access to education. She and President Barack Obama started the worldwide “Let Girls Learn” initiative earlier this year, in an effort to increase awareness and ensure girls the right to an education.



    Photo Credit: AP, File

    Michelle Obama, center, hugs students at a local high school that she visited with Bun Rany, the first lady of Cambodia, second right, Saturday, March 21, 2015, on the outskirts of Siem Reap, Cambodia as she promote the education initiative Michelle Obama, center, hugs students at a local high school that she visited with Bun Rany, the first lady of Cambodia, second right, Saturday, March 21, 2015, on the outskirts of Siem Reap, Cambodia as she promote the education initiative "Let Girls Learn." Obama will host a conversation on education accessibility today to mark the United Nations' International Day of the Girl.

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    Mars Petcare US is recalling its Cesar Classics Filet Mignon Flavor products due to a potential choking hazard from hard, white pieces of plastic that entered the wet dog food during production.

    The recall extends to products with "best before" dates of Aug. 4, 2018 and Aug. 5, 2018, the company announced. They were distributed to retail customers throughout the United States.

    The affected treats can be purchased individually and in flavor variety multipacks. The lot codes under the recall are 632D14JC, 633B24JC, 634A14JC, 634A24JC, 634B14JC, 634B24JC, 634E14JC, 635A24JC, 635B14JC, 636D24JC, 636E14JC.

    A small number of consumers have reported finding the plastic pieces, but the company said it hasn't received any reports of injury or illness associated with the affected product.

    Pet owner should discard the recalled food or return it to the retailer for a refund or to exchange it. They can contact the company by calling 800-421-6456 or visit https://www.cesar.com/notice.



    Photo Credit: FDA

    The affected Mars Petcare treats can be purchased individually and in flavor variety multipacks.The affected Mars Petcare treats can be purchased individually and in flavor variety multipacks.

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    Maine's governor says he's standing by embattled Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump after a series of controversies.

    On WVOM radio Tuesday morning, Gov. Paul LePage said he would like to see Trump "show some authoritarian power" as president.

    "Sometimes I wonder that our Constitution is not only broken, but we need a Donald Trump to show some authoritarian power in our country and bring back the rule of law because we've had eight years of a president, he's an autocrat, he just does it on his own, he ignores Congress and every single day, we're slipping into anarchy," LePage said.

    The Republican governor also weighed in on the 2005 audio tape leaked late last week, in which Trump bragged on an "Access Hollywood" bus about grabbing women "by the p****."

    "He is not my ideal guy I'd want my daughter going after," he said, but later added, "It's one thing to be in a locker room and talk, and it's another to be in the White House and do it."

    The governor, who is no stranger to his own controversies, ended the interview by calling Trump a "breath of fresh air."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/necn

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    On Facebook and Twitter, on the phone and on the job, from living rooms to hair salons, Donald Trump's "Grab 'em by the p****" comment has unleashed a tsunami of stories from women sharing painful memories of sexual assaults. 

    Many of these women were grabbed by the genitals — exactly as Trump described doing — by men who fled or melted into a crowd. Some women were molested as children on a playground or school bus. Others were groped on a train or dance floor. They've told of attacks getting out of taxicabs, harassment in the workplace and rapes on college campuses. Many shared their experiences for the first time in the days since the video of Trump's comments aired, while others have been exorcising their demons for a long time on blogs or in therapy. 

    Whatever the forum, whatever their experience, one thing is for sure: A presidential candidate's boastful description of manhandling women's bodies has become a national conversation about sexual assault. Thousands of women have stood up to say, publicly and firsthand, "This happened to me!" 

    Jennifer McGraw, 35, of Cleveland, wrote a blog post Sunday about being molested as a child called "My Disposable Body" that began with these words: "It all started with a grab of the p****." 

    McGraw, who is also a rape survivor, said social media conversations about sex assaults "have blown up" because Trump's comments about groping made speaking out more urgent than ever. 

    "This is somebody who could be our president," she told The Associated Press. "I can't not talk about it at this point. There's too much at stake. I feel strong enough at this point in my life to share my story and share my truth. That's the only way people will heal." 

    From presidential candidate Gary Hart's sexual relationship with Donna Rice in the 1980s and Bill Clinton's affairs a decade later to Anthony Weiner's more recent sexting scandal, the sex lives of politicians have been in headlines. But never before has a U.S. candidate for president made comments boasting of sexually accosting women, characterized by Trump as "locker room talk." When asked by CNN's Anderson Cooper during Sunday's debate if he'd sexually assaulted women, Trump said he had not. 

    The national conversation about sexual assault is "a powerful thing," said Delilah Rumburg, CEO of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

    "We saw this in the last year with campus sexual assaults when many young women started coming forward and speaking their truths. This is a way for them to feel like they have some power back when they can tell those stories, to hold not only those who commit these crimes accountable but the systems as well. I know those survivors' voices can do much more than I ever could as an advocate." 

    Edith Bluhm, 48, of Nashville, Tennessee, says her friends' Facebook threads have been filled with harrowing stories of everything from date-rape to child molestation. 

    "I have had the experience of going into a crowd and someone has their hand inside my shirt," she said. "Or you're on a dance floor and some guy is grinding against you. Or I'm on a train and felt a hand up my skirt. It's not just about rape. There's all these things that women have endured, these violations of our bodies, that Trump says you can get away with. 

    "Somehow it's dismissed because it's fleeting," Bluhm added. "It's a hand and then it's gone. ...If I say, angrily, 'Some guy over there was just rubbing up against me, you might say, 'Oh gross,' and move on. But later why do I feel like I want to crawl out of my skin? ...It's completely wrong." 

    Alicia McCauley, 30, blogged about her experiences with sexual assault, from being grabbed between the legs as a child to being raped. Just recently, a New York City cab driver pinned and groped her as she got out of his taxi. She filed a complaint against him and discovered four other women had filed similar reports against the same driver. 

    "Hearing Trump say you can do anything you want, you can grab them by the p**** — I hate using the word 'triggering' but it felt very reminiscent of all the traumas I have experienced," she said. McCauley said she told relatives that "if they voted for Trump, I would see it as personal, saying it's OK to do these things to women. They are agreeing with rape culture and agreeing with male entitlement." 

    McCauley said "the stories have always been there," but they're "pouring out now" because the outrage over Trump's comments "has created a space where people are finally agreeing with assault survivors." 

    Kimberly McDermott, 42, of Alexandria, Virginia, shared stories on Facebook and Twitter of being groped at a concert and sexually harassed by teachers and a boss. "I had no idea other friends had gone through so many similar experiences and had also been too embarrassed to speak up," McDermott said. "That was the case in almost every instance, and these were smart, outspoken women. We cannot go back to this behavior!" 

    Writer Kelly Oxford unleashed thousands of sex assault stories from women over the weekend by asking women to tweet her their assaults: "they aren't just stats. I'll go first: Old man on city bus grabs my 'p****' and smiles at me, I'm 12." Many responses were posted with the hashtag #NotOkay. 

    Among those who tweeted stories back to Oxford were friends of Spring Weaver, 33. "I felt really sad for my friends who were being triggered by the statements of a presidential candidate," said Weaver, who also recounted sitting in a hair salon in Chicago on Saturday where the sole topic of conversation among every stylist and customer was Trump's comments. 

    Then, Sunday night, watching the debate, Weaver said, "I found myself crying, tearing up. I was just so upset that there were no repercussions for him."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign rally on Oct. 10, 2016, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.  The national conversation about sexual assault is Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign rally on Oct. 10, 2016, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. The national conversation about sexual assault is "a powerful thing," said Delilah Rumburg, CEO of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

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  • 10/11/16--12:33: Lost Mom Delays Wedding

  • A New Hampshire wedding got a dose of unexpected drama when the groom's mother went missing for several hours.

    State police were told Sunday afternoon Philameana Guerino hadn't been seen for hours. The 72-year-old Massachusetts woman was in Landaff, New Hampshire, to attend the wedding and had gone for a walk in the woods.

    Several troopers responded with conservation officers from New Hampshire Fish and Game and a K-9 unit. The state police also used a Reverse 911 call through the Grafton County sheriff's office to notify residents in a 5-mile area.

    Guerino was found an hour and a half later. She had gotten lost on her walk.

    State police say on their Facebook page the wedding was delayed several hours but the bride and groom "definitely have a story for the future."



    Photo Credit: New Hampshire State Police
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Members of New Hampshire State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game posing with the wedding party.Members of New Hampshire State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game posing with the wedding party.

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    The American cities with the healthiest, happiest residents are Boston, San Francisco, Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C., according to a new survey that scored communities on important health measures, NBC News reported.

    While they may not shriek "healthy living," they all have lots of sidewalks, parks and good public transportation, a report from Gallup and Healthways found. The four key components the group identified are walkability, easy biking, parks and public transit.

    "Residents in these top five communities have, on average, significantly lower rates of smoking, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and depression compared with those in the five lowest-ranked active living communities," the groups said in a statement, adding to a large body of research that's found that access to green spaces, lowered stress and other factors translate into lower rates of disease and longer lives.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

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    The death toll from Hurricane Matthew in the U.S. rose again Tuesday, with authorities saying six people were killed by the floodwaters sweeping North Carolina, NBC News reported. 

    At least 36 people have been killed by Hurricane Matthew across five Southeastern states, including 17 in North Carolina, according to Gov. Pat McCrory, who warned Tuesday that life-threatening waters continued to rise.

    One person was killed in a confrontation with a state trooper in Lumberton, North Carolina, where emergency crews spent Monday rescuing residents stranded by floodwaters.

    More than 2,000 people had to be rescued during and after the storm as water filled their homes and washed over streets, according to the North Carolina Department of Public Safety. 



    Photo Credit: AP

    A swift water rescue team down a street covered by floodwaters caused by rain from Hurricane Matthew in Lumberton, North Carolina, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.A swift water rescue team down a street covered by floodwaters caused by rain from Hurricane Matthew in Lumberton, North Carolina, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.

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    The Pentagon vowed to track down and deliver payback to whoever's responsible for firing two missiles at a Navy destroyer off the coast of Yemen Sunday, according to NBC News.

    "We are going to find out who did it and take action accordingly," said Capt. Jeff Davis, a Defense Department spokesman. "Anybody who puts U.S. Navy ships at risk does so at their own peril."

    Davis did not say who is suspected or how they planned to retaliate for the attack, which missed the USS Mason Sunday evening near the strait of Bab el-Mandeb, which separates the country from Africa.

    The attack came as thousands of Yemenis marched outside United Nations headquarters in the capital to protest a Saudi-led coalition strike on Saturday that killed at least 140 people.



    Photo Credit: AP, File

    In this Saturday, March 12, 2011 file photo, U.S. destroyer USS Mason sails in the Suez canal in Ismailia, Egypt. Two missiles fired from rebel-held territory in Yemen landed near an American destroyer passing by in the Red Sea, the U.S. Navy said on Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.In this Saturday, March 12, 2011 file photo, U.S. destroyer USS Mason sails in the Suez canal in Ismailia, Egypt. Two missiles fired from rebel-held territory in Yemen landed near an American destroyer passing by in the Red Sea, the U.S. Navy said on Monday, Oct. 10, 2016.

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    Two people have died after the batteries in implanted heart defibrillators made by St. Jude Medical failed early, and the company has issued warnings about 400,000 of the devices.

    While the company doesn't recommend that doctors remove the devices from patients, it says doctors need to get in touch with users and check them out, NBC News reported.

    The problem is the batteries die almost without warning, the Food and Drug Administration says. The device is supposed to give a warning called an Elective Replacement Indicator (ERI) alert three months before the battery is fully depleted.

    The affected devices are St. Jude Medical Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator (CRT-D) device.



    Photo Credit: St. Jude Medical

    Quadra Assura MP(TM) CRT-DQuadra Assura MP(TM) CRT-D

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    A 40-year-old, unarmed man fatally shot by police last month had the hallucinogenic drug PCP in his system at the time of his death, according to results of a toxicology report released Tuesday.

    Terence Crutcher died in a Sept. 16 roadside encounter with Tulsa police officers, who were called to the scene on reports of a broken down SUV, NBC News reported.

    Several officers approached Crutcher, and one of them, Betty Shelby, fired at him while his hands were up beside the car, according to police. A second officer shot him with a Taser.

    Crutcher, hit in the chest, was pronounced dead soon after arriving at a nearby hospital.



    Photo Credit: Photo Courtesy Terence Crutcher's Family

    Terence Crutcher, seated center, in an undated photo provided by his family.Terence Crutcher, seated center, in an undated photo provided by his family.

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    Seven years after a nightmarish video was first posted to YouTube, officials are investigating whether its disturbing footage contains clues into the disappearance of a missing Wisconsin teen.

    The video, titled “Hi Walter! I got a new gf today!” was posted in 2009 and had gone relatively unnoticed until recently. Before being taken down by YouTube Tuesday, it went viral, capturing the attention of the Antigo Police Department.

    Police say some believe the footage is connected to a missing person case from that same year, when 15-year-old Kayla Berg vanished after being dropped off at her boyfriend’s house in Wausau, Wisconsin. The footage was posted two months to the day after Berg went missing.

    In the bizarre video, a man is seen talking to the camera, addressing someone named Walter.

    “Hi Walter, I was at the mall today and guess what happened? I met the most wonderful girl,” the man starts off saying.

    After that, he describes shopping with the girl before saying, “and then we got kind of tired at the mall and I brought her back to my place.”

    “I know she hates cameras, Walter, but I’m going to show you her anyways. You ready?” he says.

    The footage then cuts to a scene in what appears to be a basement. The man opens a door to a bathroom where a young woman is seen tied up, crying and screaming.

    Antigo police say they are “actively investigating the origin of this video.”

    "It's got some similarities and that's enoughf or us that we need to at least investigate it thoroughly," Chief Eric Roller said.

    The video, titled “Hi Walter! It’s me Patrick!” was the only one posted to the YouTube account, hiwalter.

    The caption in the profile reads, “My videos to Walter. My friend which can not seem to find me.”

    While there are some who say the video is fake or has been debunked, few have offered proof.

    Berg’s mother, Hope Sprenger, told a local TV station she believes the girl in the video is her daughter, saying “[it] sounded like her, looked like her, it gave me chills.”

    Sprenger said the clothing also looked like what she believes her daughter was wearing when she disappeared, according to WAOW TV.

    “If anyone has particular information as to the origin of the video or the identity of the individuals in the video please contact the Antigo Police Department,” the department wrote on Facebook.

    The FBI is offering $20,000 for any information that leads to an arrest and conviction in the case.

    Editor's Note: Because of the highly disturbing nature of the footage, NBC Chicago and its sister stations have chosen not to embed the video or link to it. 



    Photo Credit: Antigo Police
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    An age progression photo shows what Kayla Berg would look like today, seven years after she went missing at the age 15.An age progression photo shows what Kayla Berg would look like today, seven years after she went missing at the age 15.

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    Hillary Clinton aide Brian Fallon was in touch with the Department of Justice during litigation involving Clinton emails to be released to the public, according to emails released by WikiLeaks purportedly from her campaign chairman John Podesta's Gmail account.

    "DOJ folks inform me there is a status hearing in this case this morning," Fallon emailed a group of staffers in May 2015, NBC News reported.

    It is unclear how much contact Fallon had with Justice Department officials. The hearing he refers to was a public court hearing, the details of which are publicly available through the court.

    The email, released Tuesday, renews allegations from Republicans that the Department of Justice investigation was inappropriate and unusually cozy with the subject of the investigation: Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state.

    Clinton's opponent, Republican Donald Trump, retweeted a copy of the email on Tuesday.



    Photo Credit: AP, File

    In this May 23, 2016, file photo, Hillary Clinton gestures while speaking to more than 3,000 Service Employees International Union members at the union's 2016 international convention in Detroit.In this May 23, 2016, file photo, Hillary Clinton gestures while speaking to more than 3,000 Service Employees International Union members at the union's 2016 international convention in Detroit.

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    Donald Trump's debate performance seems to have shored up his campaign somewhat, improving by two points but still trailing Hillary Clinton by nine points in the latest NBC News / Wall Street Journal poll. 

    Trump appeared to be in freefall after a 2005 recording was released Friday in which Trump is heard making sexually aggressive comments. That day, Trump chalked up the comments to "locker room banter" in an apology, but a poll conducted over the weekend had him down 11 points, NBC News reported.

    The new poll was conducted after Sunday night's debate, and gives Clinton a 46-37 percent lead over Trump, with Johnson at eight percent and Jill Stein at two percent.

    The data showed Trump's support among Republicans recovering after the debate, with the 74 percent saying they backed him in the latest data up from 67 in polling before the debate.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Hillary Clinton  speaks as Donald Trump looks on during the town hall presidential debate at Washington University on Sunday, October 9, 2016, in St Louis, Missouri. A new NBC News / WSJ poll conducted after the debate found Clinton maintained a nine-point lead over her opponent in a four-way match-up.Hillary Clinton speaks as Donald Trump looks on during the town hall presidential debate at Washington University on Sunday, October 9, 2016, in St Louis, Missouri. A new NBC News / WSJ poll conducted after the debate found Clinton maintained a nine-point lead over her opponent in a four-way match-up.

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    For many, this election has taken an ugly, dark and virtually unprecedented turn, making the news a PG-13 minefield of lewdness that recalls the coverage of the Monica Lewinsky scandals, NBC News reported.

    The tenor of it all is putting millions of parents and teachers in a tough situation — balancing just how much to let their children see and hear while also teaching them about civics and the world around them.

    "Parents are at a loss. They don't know how to respond to their kids" said Denise Daniels, a psychologist and child development expert.

    For many, that tension came to a head with the release Friday of a recording of Donald Trump bragging about groping women in graphic ways. Some parents said they were dreading the conversation they would have to have when their kids heard the tape, while others lamented that their child had learned the slang term for female genitalia from a presidential candidate.



    Photo Credit: John Locher/AP

    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate on Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, in St. Louis. For many parents, this election cycle has become a PG-13 minefield.Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during the second presidential debate on Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, in St. Louis. For many parents, this election cycle has become a PG-13 minefield.

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    Speeding was one of the top mistakes made by teen drivers in fatal crashes across the country in the past five years, according to an AAA report.

    The report, released on Wednesday, states that teen drivers were involved in approximately 14,000 fatal crashes in the last five years—out of which 4,200 involved speeding.

    “Nearly two-thirds of people injured or killed in a crash involving a teen driver are people other than the teen,” said Bill Van Tassel, AAA’s manager of Driver Training Operations.

    According to the report, 65 percent of driving instructors responded in a survey that parents are not preparing their kids to be good drivers, compared to 10 years ago. Instructors said teens also picked up certain behaviors from their parents, such as using their cell phones while driving or speeding 15 mph more than the posted limit.

    “Most teens are learning important driving skills from watching their parents and they are picking up bad behaviors along with the good ones. So it’s up to today’s parents to set a good example. It may end up saving their children’s lives,” said Jennifer Ryan, Director of State Relations for AAA.

    Approximately 77 percent of drivers between the ages of 35 to 55 stated in a recent survey that they talked on the phone while driving. The survey, taken by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, also showed that 68 percent of teen drivers said they were distracted with their phones while driving.

    AAA advised parents to set a good example and speak to their teens about the dangers of speeding and distracted driving. The organization also reccommended teaching teens how to drive under various conditions and setting rules to follow while on the road.

    Teens should also be enrolled in qualified driver education programs, for which you can find more information here.  



    Photo Credit: NBC 5 News

    Approximately 77 percent of drivers between the ages of 35 to 55 stated in a recent survey that they talked on the phone while driving.Approximately 77 percent of drivers between the ages of 35 to 55 stated in a recent survey that they talked on the phone while driving.

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    A first-time mom says she found worms in a bottle of Similac baby formula that she fed her son. "Two ounces down I noticed the worms," said Taylor Seyler from Missouri. "Took it from his mouth, went and put a napkin over the faucet and we poured it down the drain and we saw the maggots on it." Her story isn't a unique one; another mother says she had a similar experience with Nutramigen formula. Manufacturers say contamination likely occurred after the packaging was opened.

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    Yale University Athletics has apologized for the controversial artwork on the cover of the football program from Saturday’s game against Dartmouth College. 

    The cover features past game day programs with the unofficial Native American mascot Dartmouth dropped decades ago for being racially insensitive. 

    “We are truly sorry for the hurt this program cover caused, particularly for those from Native American communities,” Yale Athletics said in a statement on Sunday. “Yale Athletics is committed to representing the best of Yale and upholding the University's values, especially respect for all.” 

    As the Yale Bulldogs won their first game of the season, the program commemorating the school’s 100th game against its Ivy League rival circulated in the Yale Bowl stands.

    “It’s very clearly caricatures of native people, right, like that’s not what native people look like,” Kodi Alvord, a Yale senior, said. 

    Alvord said he attended the game to support Native American students in the band, but he did not see the cover. 

    Soon after, he received an email from the director of the Yale Native American Cultural center. 

    “She really wanted to make sure we’d seen it,” he said. 

    Alvord described his initial reaction to the controversial artwork as surprised. 

    “I thought this was an issue that had been settled a while ago, Dartmouth retired it,” he said. 

    Alvord said he is disappointed in his university “for propagating imagery that has already been deemed inappropriate for a space that claims to be about intellectual discussion and accurate history.” 

    The executive director for the Yale Indigenous Performing Arts program Mary Kathryn Nagle tweeted, “Cannot believe that @Yale & #Dartmouth would use such dehumanizing images of #Redface at a football game.” 

    “We apologize for [Saturday's] football game program cover that included historic artwork of insulting portrayals of indigenous people, images that we have long considered to be a violation of our values of mutual respect, equality, and decency,” the Yale Athletics statement said, “ We did not intend to perpetuate these portrayals or condone them.” 

    Alvord said the Native American community at Yale scored a victory Monday. In a campus-wide email, Yale President Peter Salovey recognized the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples Day, not just Columbus Day.

    “I don’t think it came from a malevolent place,” Alvord said of the decision to publish the football program cover. “I think it came from a very widespread sense of ignorance about native people, most people don’t know what it’s like to exist as an indigenous person.”



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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