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US and World News

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    Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump used a surprise stop in Chicago Wednesday to target Hillary Clinton for failing the bar exam in Washington D.C. years ago and claimed he would be "the greatest president for jobs that God has ever created."

    “Hillary Clinton, who I happen to believe is grossly incompetent, by the way, I just feel she’s grossly incompetent,” Trump said at Chicago’s Polish National Alliance, “Hillary Clinton is going to increase taxes and she didn’t pass her bar exam in Washington, D.C. A lot of people don’t know that.”

    “I happen to believe that she’ll be very, very bad for our country. I think it will be worse than four more years of Obama,” he added.

    He vowed, if elected, he'll be the "greatest president for jobs that God ever created."

    According to NBC News, Clinton failed the bar exam in D.C. in 1973. Trump first admonished Clinton for failing the exam in a tweet last month. In her 2003 autobiography “Living history,” Clinton noted that she failed the D.C. bar exam the same summer she passed the Arkansas bar.

    “Despite the satisfaction of my work, I was lonely and missed Bill more than I could stand,” Clinton told NBC News. “I had taken both the Arkansas and Washington, D.C. bar exams during the summer, but my heart was pulling me toward Arkansas,” she wrote. “When I learned that I passed in Arkansas but failed in D.C., I thought maybe my test scores were telling me something."

    Trump, who was criticized following Monday’s presidential debate for sniffling onstage despite his staff denying reports, sounded a bit nasally during Wednesday’s event. The Republican, who famously called his opponent Jeb Bush “low energy” during the Republican primaries, seemed to lack his typical gusto during the speech.

    The real estate magnate was introduced Wednesday by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who thanked Chicago for sending police officers in the wake of the 9/11 attacks and faulted the Obama Administration and former Secretary of State Clinton for resetting the United State’s relationship with Russia and giving up a nuclear defense of the Czech Republic and Poland.

    Giuliani also had some harsh words for Russia, claiming the U.S. needs to bolster its military to defend against Russian President Vladimir Putin, who he called a “bully.”

    “[Trump] doesn’t know Putin, he’s never met Putin,” Giuliani said. “Will he negotiate with Putin? Yes. Did Reagan negotiate with Gorbachev? Yes. But he’s going to negotiate with him from a position of military strength that dwarfs the Soviet... I’m sorry, Russia.”

    Following the introduction, Trump pledged to support the Polish community in America.

    “The Polish people are great people, these are great people, and if I get elected, believe me, we take care of all our people, all of our people,” Trump said. “But we do have a very, very special place because Polish-Americans, what you’ve done for this country, is really incredible and I don’t think frankly that people know the great sacrifices that you’ve gone through,” he added.

    The Republican also boasted about being dubbed “Mr. Brexit” after championing the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union earlier this year, breaking with President Barack Obama, who opposed the move.

    Trump claimed that America would "have a job growth like we’ve never seen” if taxes and regulations could be cut on businesses. He faulted Obama for the national deficit growing to unprecedented levels during his administration and bemoaned the nation's faltering infrastructure, schools, hospitals and airports.

    The Republican nominee is now set to attend a big-ticket fundraiser at Bolingbrook Golf Club Wednesday afternoon.

    committeeman 


    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Donald Trump speaks with Polish-American community members at the Polish National Alliance in Chicago on September 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. Trump will be campaigning today in Iowa and Wisconsin.Donald Trump speaks with Polish-American community members at the Polish National Alliance in Chicago on September 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. Trump will be campaigning today in Iowa and Wisconsin.

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    Demonstrators rallied in front of a police station in San Diego’s East County Wednesday demanding a federal investigation into the deadly police shooting of an unarmed black man and the full release of a video that shows the encounter.

    Signs in hand, protesters gathered at the El Cajon Police Department (ECPD) in their quest for answers into the fatal shooting of Alfred Olango, a refugee from Uganda. Olango, 38, emigrated to the U.S. in 1991 when he was 12 years old.

    “We’re looking for procedural justice,” said Bishop Cornelius Bowser, of Charity Apostolic Church, at the rally. “We don’t want to see a still picture of him pointing something that was not a gun. We want to see the whole story, so put the whole video out.”

    “These senseless killings have to stop – not just here in El Cajon, but in the entire country. We need answers, not just one photo that tells one side of the story,” said Estella De Los Rios, a longtime resident of El Cajon and civil rights activist.

    The ECPD confirmed officers obtained video of the incident captured on a cell phone by an employee at a nearby taco shop. Police said the witness voluntarily turned that video over to investigators.

    Officers with the ECPD are not currently outfitted with body-worn cameras.

    From that clip shot by a bystander, the ECPD released a still image that they said shows why Olango appeared to be a threat to officers.

    The photo shows the man in what police described as a “shooting stance,” pointing some sort of object at two officers. The ECPD has not said what that object was.

    Rev. Shane Harris, of the National Action Network San Diego, said the image released by police does not reveal the full story of what transpired between officers and Olango. Other speakers at the rally said the release of the single photo only serves to "shape the narrative" of police.

    “The nation’s eyes are watching us. America’s Finest City – it ain’t looking so fine right now,” Harris said.

    According to the ECPD, officers approached Olango Tuesday just after 1 p.m. in the parking lot of the Broadway Village Shopping Center on Broadway after his sister called authorities to ask for help because her brother was “not acting like himself.”

    Police said Olango was walking in and out of traffic and said the man was acting “erratically.”

    ECPD Chief Jeff Davis said at a news briefing Tuesday that the officers who approached Olango told him to take his hands out of the pockets of his pants, but he allegedly “refused multiple instructions by the first officer on the scene” and kept his hands in his pockets.

    The man then pulled an object from his pocket and pointed it at officers, assuming a “shooting stance,” Davis said.

    The ECPD said one of the officers deployed a Taser on the man, while the other officer fired multiple rounds, striking and killing him.

    Davis said the two officers involved in the shooting each have 21 years of service as police officers. Per standard department policy, both officers have been placed on leave, as the investigation is ongoing.

    The shooting sparked uproar in the community amid racial tensions across the nation stemming from many other deadly shootings of unarmed black men by police officers, including the recent killing of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina.

    At the rally Wednesday, locals addressed those tensions, including longtime El Cajon resident Eddie Price.

    “I’ve been a black man for 56 years. The feelings that I’m feeling are not new,” said Price, saying that he’s been targeted by police his entire life for the color of his skin.

    “I’m armed right now. I’m armed with the melanin in my skin and information in my mind. I’m armed and dangerous. That’s what I feel like, every time I see the police, I feel like I’m already armed and dangerous and I’m a suspect already,” Price explained. “That’s no way to live.”

    Price also demanded justice in this case.

    “We don’t want you to look at us like us. We want you to look at us like you. We want morals and humanity back in this society. I’m tired of walking around like I’m a target,” he said. “We need some action. Feel something.”

    Price, along with other speakers, called for the news media to support the black community.

    “It’s not just us against them,” added Price, referring to the police. “This goes into the morality of humanity. Everybody ought to be conflicted about this. Imagine if this was you.”

    The rally was peaceful but became heated for a moment when Armand King, leader of the Paving Brighter Futures organization, stepped up to the podium.

    “They murdered somebody last night. Somebody’s at home right now with their family, and someone is dead now,” said King. “This is just wrong.”

    The crowd began chanting, “Murder! Murder!”

    At that moment, a man in the crowd heckled King and he was shaken.

    “We cannot respond to them,” said Christopher Rice-Wilson, of Alliance San Diego, who led the rally.

    “Every time a black man is killed by police, it’s a message to us to stay in line. When we speak out, we’re told we don’t matter. Black lives matter. And if a black life doesn’t matter, then no lives matter. We’re supposed to be all equals,” said Rice-Wilson.

    Mallory Webb, president of the San Diego Youth and College Division of the NAACP, also spoke briefly talking about her experience as a young black woman.

    “I’m angry. I’m very angry and I’m hurt. That could be my little brother; that could be my twin sister any time. I don’t know what to do,” she lamented. “I’m scared to walk the streets every single day – I walk to school every single day – and why do I feel like I have to look behind bushes and hide behind trees? Because I could get shot and killed at any time.”

    Fighting back tears, Webb added: “It’s not fair at all. Every life. I bleed the same color of blood as you do!”

    As the young woman spoke, people in the crowd could be heard responding, “We’re all one nation!” and “We’re all human beings.”

    Rice-Wilson said Olango was killed for three reasons: for being black, for being mentally ill and for not following orders from police.

    “How do you expect a man who can’t understand your orders to follow your orders?” he asked the crowd.

    Rice-Wilson criticized the ECPD for not calling for help from the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT) during their encounter with Olango.

    According to the 211 San Diego website, PERT “provides emergency assessment and referral for individuals with mental illness who come to the attention of law enforcement. PERT pairs licensed mental health clinicians with uniformed law enforcement officers and deputies.

    “The PERT team should’ve been dispatched to handle and deal with Mr. Olango. Why did they not dispatch a PERT team?” said Rice-Wilson.

    NBC 7 asked the ECPD about utilizing PERT in this case. Lt. Rob Ransweiler said at least one of the officers involved in the shooting had attended at three-day PERT training course. He said all officers who graduate from the police academy get some kind of PERT training.

    Harris said he’s been in contact with Olango’s family and they plan to seek a federal investigation into the deadly police shooting.

    “We do not trust local prosecutors to investigate local police,” said Harris. “You won’t have no peace until we get justice. We will not sit down and shut up!”

    Agnes Hassan, a woman from Sudan who was friends with Olango, spoke briefly at the end of the rally and said Olango was a refugee from Uganda. They both moved to El Cajon in search of a better life and future for their families.

    “We suffer too much – there was a war in Africa, to suffer again?” Hassan said with tears in her eyes. “If somebody has mental problem, how can you not deal with him with a mental problem? This is not right.”

    “My heart is just broken,” she sobbed.

    NBC 7 reached out to the ECPD Wednesday morning and the police department said it had no news conferences planned for today. No further details on the case were immediately released.

    Harris said the officer who shot Olango has “a history,” but said he would be releasing those details at another news conference Thursday.



    Photo Credit: NBC 7

    A photo of Alfred Olango from Facebook is shown with a still image of the shooting scene in El Cajon, California.A photo of Alfred Olango from Facebook is shown with a still image of the shooting scene in El Cajon, California.

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    One of the biggest voices heard following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott was from a 9-year-old during Monday's Charlotte City Council meeting. Zianna Oliphant's message about protests in Charlotte has spread, capturing the hearts and attention world-wide. "We are black people, and we shouldn't have to feel like this," she said. "We shouldn't have to protest because y'all are treating us wrong."

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    OPEC nations reached a preliminary agreement Wednesday to curb oil production for the first time since the global financial crisis eight years ago, pushing up prices that had sunk over the past two years and weakened the economies of oil-producing nations.

    Mohammed Bin Saleh Al-Sada, Qatar's energy minister and current president of OPEC, announced the deal after several hours of talks in the Algerian capital. The levels must still be finalized at an OPEC meeting in Vienna in November.

    The preliminary deal will limit output from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to between 32.5 million and 33 million barrels per day, he said. Current output is estimated at 33.2 million barrels per day.

    Benchmark U.S. crude jumped $2.38, or 5.3 percent, to $47.05 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, the international standard, was up $2.72, or 5.9 percent, to $48.69 a barrel in London.

    Long-running disagreements between regional rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran had dimmed hopes for a deal at Wednesday's talks.

    Iran had been resistant to cutting production, as it's trying to restore its oil industry since emerging from international sanctions over its nuclear program earlier this year. According to Wednesday's deal, Iran exceptionally will be allowed to increase production to 3.7 million barrels a day, according to Algerian participants at the meeting. It is currently estimated to be pumping around 3.6 million.

    The OPEC officials met informally on the sidelines of an energy conference in Algiers to try to find common ground on how to support oil markets.

    "We reached a very positive deal," said Nigerian Oil Minister Emmanuel Ibe Kachikwu. He said all countries will reduce output but the specific quotas will be set in Vienna in November.

    Earlier, Iranian Petroleum Minister Bijan Namdar Zanganeh had played down the OPEC gathering, calling it "just a consultation meeting."

    The price of crude oil has fallen sharply since mid-2014, when it was over $100 a barrel, dropping below $30 at the start of this year.

    Saudi Arabia, the world's biggest oil producer and Iran's rival for power in the Middle East, appeared to be more amenable to some sort of production limit, certainly more so than in April when OPEC failed to agree on measures to curb supplies.

    Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih this week promised to "support any decision aimed at stabilizing the market."

    Over the past couple of years, OPEC countries, led by Saudi Arabia, had been willing to let the oil price drop as a means of driving some U.S. shale oil and gas producers out of business. Shale oil and gas requires a higher price to break even.

    Those lower prices have hurt many oil-producing nations hard, particularly OPEC members Venezuela and Nigeria, but also Russia and Brazil.



    Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images, File

    Gas prices jumped in May, which experts said was due to oil prices edging up. At OPEC's latest informal meeting, a decision was made for countries to curb their oil output, leading to a rise in oil prices.Gas prices jumped in May, which experts said was due to oil prices edging up. At OPEC's latest informal meeting, a decision was made for countries to curb their oil output, leading to a rise in oil prices.

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    Federal authorities think they've identified the men seen on camera taking luggage allegedly planted on a Manhattan sidewalk by a man accused of terror and other charges in connection with explosions in New York and New Jersey earlier this month, senior law enforcement officials told NBC 4 New York.

    The officials said the two men seen in the video taking the bag — but leaving behind the pressure cooker bomb that was inside — from West 27th Street on Sept. 17 are believed to be airline employees and are now likely overseas.

    One senior official familiar with the investigation said they are thought to be employees who worked as part of a flight crew for an Egyptian airline. They were identified from a security camera at the hotel where they were staying. 

    The men have never been considered suspects; authorities have said they wanted to recover the luggage to assist in their investigation. Officials say the the FBI believes it knows where the men are and is trying to reach them. 

    The FBI's New York office released a photo of the two men on Sept. 21, four days after the bombing. 

    "They are witnesses, we are very interested in talking to them and hearing about how they found the bag," Jim Waters, head of the NYPD's counterterrorism bureau, said last week. "They found the bag, opened it, found the device -- a pressure cooker -- and took the bag. They are witnesses. There are no criminal charges. I want to stress that."

    The pressure cooker bomb inside the suitcase was allegedly planted by Ahmad Rahami, a New Jersey resident who was charged with planting that device and one that exploded on 23rd Street, injuring 31 people, Sept. 17. He is also charged with planting the pipe bomb that exploded in a trash bin along a Marine 5K race in Seaside Park, New Jersey, hours earlier.

    Waters said the men who removed the bomb from the bag were "very lucky" they weren't hurt. He said if the men weren't plugged into news coverage, it was possible they still didn't know they had taken the bag that held the bomb.



    Photo Credit: Handout
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    Internet meme Pepe the Frog has been declared a symbol of hate by the Anti-Defamation League. The green amphibian has been frequently used by alt-right campaigners, Donald Trump supporters and white supremacist groups, NBC News reported.

    While Pepe's origin as the "feels good man" is inoffensive, it has recently been appropriated for bigoted, anti-Semitic themes, according to the ADL.

    "Although Pepe memes have many defenders, the use of racist and bigoted versions of Pepe memes seems to be increasing, not decreasing," ADL announced in their inclusion of the meme into the database of hate symbols.

    The frog has been posted on social media by presidential candidate Donald Trump and his son in various contexts, including a play on a poster of "The Expendables" to "The Deplorables," featuring Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, alt-right icon Milo Yiannopoulos and Pepe the Frog.



    Photo Credit: Anti-Defamation League

    While Pepe’s origin as the “feels good man” is inoffensive, it has recently been appropriated for bigoted, anti-Semitic themes according to the Anti-Defamation League.While Pepe’s origin as the “feels good man” is inoffensive, it has recently been appropriated for bigoted, anti-Semitic themes according to the Anti-Defamation League.

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    Donald Trump's debate performance did not help his standing among among women likely to vote in the election in November, according to a new NBC News|SurveyMoney poll taken after Monday’s debate.

    NBC News reported that 27 percent of likely female voters said the debate caused them to think worse of Trump, while just 12 percent said their views on Clinton worsened. Eleven percent of women voters said their views on Trump improved while 30 percent said their views on Hillary Clinton improved.

    The poll found that overall, 52 percent of likely voters who watched the debate or followed coverage on it thought Hillary Clinton won, and women named Clinton the winner of the debate by a 10-point margin over men.

    "I'm undecided, but I'm leaning more towards Hillary than I ever have before because of the debate," said Joan Hume, a 71-year-old retiree from Ohio who said she voted for Trump in the primary.



    Photo Credit: AP, File

    In this file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. A new poll shows that women think less of Trump and better of Clinton following the debate.In this file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton shakes hands with Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during the presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. A new poll shows that women think less of Trump and better of Clinton following the debate.

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    Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson went on the offensive over foreign policy Wednesday night, but not before drawing a blank on the names of just about every foreign leader alive today.

    Even Johnson had to admit he was making a gaffe as he tried and failed to answer Chris Matthews' question on who his favorite foreign leader is, holding his head in his hand for seconds on a live episode of MSNBC's "Hardball," filmed at a town hall in the University of New Hampshire.

    "I guess I'm having an Aleppo moment on the former president of Mexico," he said.

    Johnson, the former governor of New Mexico, was referring to a blunder he made a few weeks ago on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," when he was asked what he would do about the situation in war-torn Aleppo in Syria.

    "What is Aleppo?" he asked. Johnson later expressed frustration with himself and said, "I have to get smarter."

    In Wednesday's gaffe, Johnson managed to identify "the former president of Mexico" as his favorite leader, but couldn't name which one. His running mate, ex-Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, chimed in with the name Vicente Fox, which Johnson said was correct.

    Later in the Q&A, Johnson took a big swing at Hillary Clinton, saying he doesn't have confidence in her when it comes to nuclear weapons restraint.

    Johnson insisted "she's gonna shoot" when Matthews asked if he thinks Clinton has a "happy trigger," going on to say he thought she would not want to be perceived as weak.

    "Confronted with that 10 minutes, she's gonna be hawkish," he said.

    Johnson is polling at 10 percent among likely voters, according to the latest NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll. He told Matthews he needs to start polling higher so that he'd be able to participate in the final two debates and have a shot at winning the presidency.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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    Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson gestures as he speaks during a 2016 presidential election forum at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace August 12, 2016, in Las Vegas.Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson gestures as he speaks during a 2016 presidential election forum at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace August 12, 2016, in Las Vegas.

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    A crowd of people angry over the shooting death of an unarmed black man in El Cajon has blocked streets and come face to face with uniformed law enforcement officers in San Diego's East County.

    Protesters holding signs walked in between cars traveling in the opposite direction along Broadway.

    Some protesters cursed as they walk, others screamed, "No violence! No violence!"

    A dozen San Diego County Sheriff's deputies stood in a line across Broadway near Ballantyne Street, approximately two blocks west of Mollison Avenue. It appears that they are trying to keep the protesters from getting onto State Route 67.

    Parkway Plaza in El Cajon, on the 400 block of Fletcher Parkway off Interstate 8, temporarily closed their doors Wednesday because of the protesters. 

    "By request of local authorities and out of an abundance of caution, Parkway Plaza will be temporarily closed due to demonstrations in the area. We will let you know when we are scheduled to reopen," the Plaza said in a statement on their Facebook page.

    El Cajon Police said the mall chose to close on its own. Police are not actively evacuating patrons. 

    On Tuesday, officers with the El Cajon Police Department (ECPD) shot and killed Alfred Olango during an encounter in the parking lot of a shopping center in the 800 block of Broadway. Police said Olango was reported to be "acting erratically" and did not follow orders to remove his hands from the pockets of his pants.

    Police said at one point he pulled an object from his pants and pointed it at officers in a "shooting stance." An object, which has yet to be identified, was recovered at the scene, but no weapon, police said.

    The killing of Olango sparked outrage in the community amid racial tensions nationwide stemming from deadly police shootings of unarmed black men.

    An NBC 7 news crew captured one confrontation between a protester and a sheriff's deputy.

    “Pigs! Be scared! [You’re all] in riot gear because you’re all f---ing cowards!” the protester said.

    Suddenly a woman nearby chimed in, directing her comment to the deputy, “No, you guys aren’t. You guys are doing your jobs."

    "You may not be part of it, but your buddies are," another man shouted at law enforcement officers. "It's time to expose everybody."

    A man wearing a shirt with the words #BlackLives tried to walk across the line formed by law enforcement but was quickly stopped by a deputy.

    The man shouted that he was trying to get to his son on the other side of the line.

    “Stop! Go back!” the deputy told the man.

    “Are you kidding me?” the man asked the deputy. “You wonder why we gotta problem with you all? Are you serious?”

    "Is not following police orders a justification for killing? This is Murder," said Christopher Rice-Wilson, the Associate Director at Alliance San Diego who was one of the protesters.

    Olango, 38, was born in Uganda and emigrated to the U.S. in 1991 when he was 12 years old.



    Photo Credit: KNSD
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    A majority (52 percent) of voters who followed the first presidential debate said Hillary Clinton won, according to an NBC News/Survey Monkey post-debate poll.

    Twenty-one percent of those polled thought Trump was the winner, while 26 percent said neither candidate emerged victorious.

    Fifty percent of Democrats said their impression of Clinton changed for the better after watching the debate. About a quarter of Republicans polled said their impression of Trump changed positively.

    Thirty percent of women polled, regardless of party affiliation, said their opinion of Clinton improved after the debate, while just 11 percent of women overall said their opinion of Trump changed for the better.

    The first face-off of the 2016 presidential election cycle broke debate viewership records and about three-quarters of respondents said they watched the debate live.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listens during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y.Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listens during the Presidential Debate at Hofstra University on Sept. 26, 2016, in Hempstead, N.Y.

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    A new type of artificial bone shaped with a 3-D printer can repair deformed bones and help heal some spine, skull and jaw injuries, researchers say in a new report printed in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

    When the bone material was tested in a monkey, the bone fused to the animal’s skull and new blood vessels grew into it, NBC News reports.

    “Within four weeks, the implant had fully integrated, fully vascularized with the monkey’s own skull,” researcher Adam Jakus said. “And there is actually evidence of new bone formation.”

    The hyper-elastic bone can be shaped with a 3-D printer to customize individual implants. Scientists hope to be able to test the implants in humans within the next five years.



    Photo Credit: Adam E. Jakus, PhD

    The hyperelastic bone material used to make this human skull could help people heal from skull, spine or other bone injuries.The hyperelastic bone material used to make this human skull could help people heal from skull, spine or other bone injuries.

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    Fall may have officially arrived, but the summer camp experience is still going for some. More and more adults are reliving the summer camp experience during fall and spring. More than a million adults a year are indulging in camps according to the American Camp Association.

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    Miles of tire tracks left behind by someone out for a joyride mark the latest act of vandalism in California's Death Valley National Park.

    The tracks in the hottest, driest place on earth extend for about 10 miles, including looping patterns likely created by doughnuts from the sport utility vehicle's tires, on the fragile surface of the park's "Racetrack Playa." The scars will likely remain on the surface for years because exposed loose silt can be blown away by strong winds, causing a depression in the dry soil.

    The remote dry lake is known for unusual tracks, but not the man-made kind.

    In 2014, scientists unraveled the mystery behind the Playa's "moving rocks," which appeared to leave jagged trails in the surface. The researchers found that large sheets of ice were pushed by winds into the rocks, acting as a sail that moved the rocks across the lake bed.

    But there was no mystery behind the SUV tire tracks, discovered in August by a park ranger. A GPS rendering of the route shows the SUV driver traveled erratically back and forth along the lake bed, made several sharp turns and turned a few doughnuts.

    "We are hopeful that someone will be charged in this case," Abby Wines, a park spokeswoman, told the Los Angeles Times, adding that investigators have a "strong lead."

    Federal investigators told the Times they have identified a suspect believed responsible for the vandalism.

    Authorities did not release the suspect's name.

    The destructive driving case comes after three men were charged in May in connection with damage to a Death Valley National Park rock tub. A federally endangered Devil's Hole Pupfish was found dead at the site. 

    The suspects in that case were identified through DNA left at the crime scene. The park service also released surveillance video of the shotgun-wielding men as they broke into Devil's Hole.

    In June, a San Diego woman pleaded guilty to misdemeanor counts of defiling rocks formations at Death Valley and other national parks.



    Photo Credit: Death Valley National Park

    Miles of tire tracks left behind by someone out for a joyride in August 2015 mark the latest act of vandalism in Death Valley National Park.Miles of tire tracks left behind by someone out for a joyride in August 2015 mark the latest act of vandalism in Death Valley National Park.

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    Philadelphia police officers shot and killed a man who injured five people, including his son and daughter, during a stabbing spree in the Cobbs Creek section of the city, police said.

    Police said the unidentified man first attacked his 15-year-old daughter at a home on the 6200 block of Hazel Avenue Wednesday night and grabbed her throat. He then allegedly stabbed his 8-year-old son and a 13-year-old family friend in their chest and throat.

    The man then allegedly went over to a family friend's home on Webster Street and asked for something to eat. He then stabbed a 70-year-old woman and punched a 42-year-old woman in the face, according to police.

    Police responded to the scene and confronted the man. Officials say the responding officers demanded several times that the man take his hands out of his pants. The man then allegedly moved abruptly and the officers opened fire, killing him.

    Investigators say they're unsure if the suspect had a gun but also say they recovered a knife.

    The 8-year-old boy and 13-year-old family friend who were stabbed were in critical condition late Wednesday. Officials have not revealed the conditions of the other victims.

    Police have not revealed a motive but say the suspect's daughter told them he may have been high on drugs.

    "The daughter did say that he was home and then all of sudden his eyes are like as wide as can be," said Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross. "And then he just starts to choke her for no reason, whatsoever. There was no conversation that she indicated. And then immediately stabbed and slashed the 8-year-old then turned to the 13-year-old and stabbed him multiple times."

    While police blocked off the scene, a suspected intoxicated driver slammed into an officer's patrol car, leaving the officer hospitalized with aches and pains.


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    A West Michigan oncology nurse was inspired by her own battle with childhood cancer to help kids fighting similar diseases. Read more on WOOD.

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    India said Thursday it has launched "surgical strikes" in Pakistan on suspected militants they thought were preparing to infiltrate the country from Pakistan-ruled Kashmir, NBC News reported.

    The move raised raising tensions between India and Pakistan, both nuclear-armed countries that have clashed over ownership over the Kashmir region in the Himalayas.

    They have fought three wars since independence from Britain in 1947, two of them over Kashmir.

    The Indian action represents a departure from a traditional policy of strategic restraint in the face of what New Delhi sees as cross-border terrorist acts that it believes are sponsored by the Pakistani state.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Indian Border Security Force soldiers patrol the India-Pakistan border area at Ranbir Singh Pura, about 35 kilometers (22 miles) from Jammu, India, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016.Indian Border Security Force soldiers patrol the India-Pakistan border area at Ranbir Singh Pura, about 35 kilometers (22 miles) from Jammu, India, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016.

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    The object held by a black man shot and killed by El Cajon police officers Tuesday was a type of vaping device, two police sources have confirmed to NBC7.

    Alfred Olango, a 38-year-old Ugandan refugee who friends say came to the U.S. over 20 years ago, was killed following a confrontation with police officers in the middle of the day in a public parking lot along a busy street.

    El Cajon Police Chief Jeff Davis, whose officers are not outfitted with body-worn cameras, released a still image from video captured by a witness while promising transparency and asking the community to be patient as the investigation unfolds.

    Members of the community held a rally early Wednesday to call for a federal investigation. Several hundred protesters took to the streets later in the evening, with many chanting "no justice, no peace."

    Olango pulled an object from his pants and held it out “like he would be firing a gun,” El Cajon police said. The object was a vaping smoking device with an all-silver cylinder measuring approximately 1 inch in diameter and 3 inches long. The vape had a box attached; it was collected as evidence on scene.

    "The two officers that were involved, the one that deployed the Taser and the one that fired his weapon, both have over 21 years of service as police officers," Davis said Tuesday night.

    El Cajon police said the dispatch receiving calls beginning at 1 p.m. of a man who was “not acting like himself.”

    Chief Davis said it took approximately 50 minutes for his officers to arrive at the scene. The shooting happened one to two minutes after officers arrived on scene, police told NBC 7.

    Witnesses offered conflicting accounts as to what happened. Some told NBC 7 Olango had his arms stretched out to his side. Some said he refused to raise his arms.

    According to police, Olango refused multiple instructions to remove his hand from in his pocket. This was confirmed by the manager of a nearby fast-food restaurant where a drive-through employee recorded the only video believed to have captured the entire incident.

    At the time, there was a Psychiatric Emergency Response Team (PERT) clinician with a police officer in the area, but they were responding to another call of a reported man darting in and out of traffic. They were not available. 

    The community of El Cajon, California is approximately 30 miles east of downtown San Diego.



    Photo Credit: El Cajon Police Department
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    The El Cajon Police Department released this still from witness video, showing the suspect in confrontation with officers.The El Cajon Police Department released this still from witness video, showing the suspect in confrontation with officers.

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    A Colorado based brewery plans to market their cannabis-infused beer across the country. One question: does it get you high?

    Photo Credit: KUSA

    Colorado based brewery plans to market their cannabis-infused beer nationwide.Colorado based brewery plans to market their cannabis-infused beer nationwide.

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    Two days after the first presidential debate, top aides and people close to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump admit the candidate's performance was subpar and that he must dramatically improve in his second showdown against Hillary Clinton, NBC News reported.

    While Trump has been actively spinning his debate performance as a win and insisting that any areas of imperfection were not his fault, his confidants were telling a different story.

    The debate was a "disaster" for Trump, according to one source close to the campaign. Also dissatisfied with the debate performance were Trump's children, according to a campaign aide, who said they wish campaign leadership had forced him to take it more seriously.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Donald Trump speaks with Polish-American community members at the Polish National Alliance in Chicago on Sept. 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.Donald Trump speaks with Polish-American community members at the Polish National Alliance in Chicago on Sept. 28, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.

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    Jamie Weatherhead-Sal, a passenger aboard the NJ Transit train that plowed into Hoboken Terminal, recounts the harrowing experience.

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